Altar offerings

Chat about pagan and Wiccan holidays.
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Corbin
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Altar offerings

Post by Corbin »

Gŵyl Awst blessings.

So there are eight Sabbats or spokes in the wiccan / neo-pagan calander.

Starting Lammas / Lughnasadh (one of the easiest), what kind of offerings do you place on your altar and why? (from the obvious to the less so).

What do you feel is 'the spirit of the seasonal observation? Why? (from the obvious to the less so also).

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firebirdflys
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Re: Altar offerings

Post by firebirdflys »

Blessed Lughnasadh.!!
I have the most obvious, which is a shaft of wheat.
Today I am placing an estimate for a garage door that I had from 2007, I'm harvesting something that has been gestating for one long Arse time. The company that did the estimate does not come to the Valley anymore so he reccomend a friend that was closer. Well to make a long story even longer, the "friend" came out the day I called, took the measurements and had already quoted me the price which was only 70 dollars more that the quote from 2007! I had another guy lined up who was originally going to charge me 1100.oo dollars, when he saw there was a shelf to work around he raised the price to 1450.oo, New "friend" guy said shelf wasn't a problem. Anyhoo, I penciled in with new guy to have it done next friday! Then he called yesterday and moved me up to Monday, so considering the time of year and the thing we have really needed here for a looooog time is a garage door that works, it feels like harvest. We've had an old wooden one that you can't lift because springs are broke, not to mention the thing is ALL chewed up and falling apart, it looks horrible. Now the biggest problem will be getting the car that doesn't run out of the driveway l halfsm

I offer the wheat to honor the beginning of the decent into the dark half of the year and as a sign of the golden ray's of Lugh shining brow setting into the West.
The receipt was a large project that required the help of others to make happen, and am thrilled to be finally crossing that harvest threshold. (Interesting note, the date from 2007 is near exact the time frame (late July) 13 years ago from when the ball rolled again in 2020) so I guess planting the seed of a garage door takes 13 years! LoL : :lol:

The spirit of the holiday for me is to take pause and be proud of hard work that has been put forward to this point, perhaps play some and feast for sure!

Bb, Firebird
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SpiritTalker
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Re: Altar offerings

Post by SpiritTalker »

Normally I’d offer some bread, preferably home made to honor reanimation thru transformation, but today crackers will have to do.

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firebirdflys
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Re: Altar offerings

Post by firebirdflys »

🍓
I'll be using a strawberry to represent my harvest, one I managed to salvage from the critters who usually eat them right off the bush before I can get to them, think I'll crack a brew from a brewery we won't be able to travel to this year, it's called 395, in honor of the road one takes to get to these places.

I usually think of this time as travel season as well, from now until mid September or so.
Sort of like the journey Bards would take to the Eisteddfod. The traveling long circuits in the coming together to share art, words and music. This was the moment in the cycle that folks had the time to do this.

Here's a lovely image of wheat shafts carved from amber.
(From wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amulet)

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Corbin
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Re: Altar offerings

Post by Corbin »

Wheat and other grains, baked bread, a dram of whisky.

--------

There were three men come out of the west, their fortunes for to try
And these three men made a solemn vow, John Barleycorn would die
They've ploughed, they've sown, they've harrowed, thrown clods upon his head
Till these three men were satisfied John Barleycorn was dead

There's beer all in the barrel and brandy in the glass
But little Sir John, with his nut-brown bowl, proved the strongest man at last

They've let him lie for a long long time till the rains from heaven did fall
And little Sir John sprang up his head and so amazed them all
They've let him stand till midsummer's day and he looks both pale and wan
Then little Sir John's grown a long long beard and so become a man

There's beer all in the barrel and brandy in the glass
But little Sir John, with his nut-brown bowl, proved the strongest man at last.
There's beer all in the barrel and brandy in the glass
But little Sir John, with his nut-brown bowl, proved the strongest man at last

They've hired men with the sharp-edged scythes to cut him off at the knee
They've rolled him and tied him around the waist, treated him most barbarously

They've hired men with the sharp-edged forks to prick him to the heart
And the loader has served him worse than that for he's bound him to the cart

So they've wheeled him around and around the field till they've come unto a barn
And here they've kept their solemn word concerning Barleycorn

They've hired men with the crab tree sticks to split him skin from bone
And the miller has served him worse than that for he's ground him between two stones

There's beer all in the barrel and brandy in the glass
But little Sir John, with his nut-brown bowl, proved the strongest man at last

There's beer all in the barrel and brandy in the glass
But little Sir John, with his nut-brown bowl, proved the strongest man at last.

And the huntsman he can't hunt the fox nor loudly blow his horn
And the tinker he can't mend his pots without John Barleycorn.

- version of 'John Barleycorn' from folk tradition.

-------

It was upon a Lammas night,
When corn rigs are bonie,
Beneath the moon's unclouded light,
I held awa to Annie:
The time flew by, wi' tentless heed,
Till 'tween the late and early;
Wi' sma' persuasion she agreed,
To see me thro' the barley.

Corn rigs, an' barley rigs,
An' corn rigs are bonie:
I'll ne'er forget that happy night,
Amang the rigs wi' Annie.

The sky was blue, the wind was still,
The moon was shining clearly;
I set her down, wi' right good will,
Amang the rigs o' barley:
I ken't her heart was a' my ain;
I lov'd her most sincerely;
I kiss'd her owre and owre again,
Amang the rigs o' barley.

I lock'd her in my fond embrace;
Her heart was beating rarely:
My blessings on that happy place,
Amang the rigs o' barley!
But by the moon and stars so bright,
That shone that hour so clearly!
She ay shall bless that happy night
Amang the rigs o' barley.

I hae been blythe wi' Comrades dear;
I hae been merry drinking;
I hae been joyfu' gath'rin gear;
I hae been happy thinking:
But a' the pleasures e'er I saw,
Tho' three times doubl'd fairly,
That happy night was worth them a',
Amang the rigs o' barley.

Corn rigs, an' barley rigs,
An' corn rigs are bonie:
I'll ne'er forget that happy night,
Amang the rigs wi' Annie.

- Corn Rigs by Robert Burns (likely from earlier sources)

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