Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

General chit chat and discussions here.
All are welcome!
User avatar
SnowCat
Banned Member
Posts: 5528
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:29 am
Gender: Female
Location: The Spirals

Re: The Japanese Language

Post by SnowCat »

I've always had the impression that Japanese is more precise than English.

Snow
Daughter of Sekhmet

User avatar
Kassandra
Posts: 3394
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy

Re: The Japanese Language

Post by Kassandra »

SnowCat wrote:I've always had the impression that Japanese is more precise than English.
In fact, it's quite the opposite. They don't often use pronouns in sentences, so there's a lot of misunderstandings that happen. I don't know why the government doesn't say, "From now on, we must use pronouns for clarity's sake," and just make it a rule or something, lol.



.

User avatar
Lord_of_Nightmares
Posts: 957
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2015 9:26 pm
Gender: Transgender Man
Location: 9th layer of the underworld
Contact:

Re: The Japanese Language

Post by Lord_of_Nightmares »

SnowCat wrote:I've always had the impression that Japanese is more precise than English.

Snow
As K said, it actually is not. It's a very contextual language that does not always get too specific. Confusion can abound, esp. on complicated subjects.
I am the Earth, The Sun and the Stars
And I am the also the Moon
I am all animal and birds,
And I am the outcast as well, and the thief
I am the low person of dreadful deeds,
And the great person of excellent deeds
I am Female. I am Male and I am Neuter.
- Devi

SilverWort
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:45 am
Gender: Male
Location: Spain

Re: The Japanese Language

Post by SilverWort »

Lady_Lilith wrote:
SnowCat wrote:I've always had the impression that Japanese is more precise than English.

Snow
As K said, it actually is not. It's a very contextual language that does not always get too specific. Confusion can abound, esp. on complicated subjects.
Just a quote from a king:
"I speak Italian with the ambassadors; French with women; German with the soldiers; English with horses, and Spanish with God." Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

User avatar
SnowCat
Banned Member
Posts: 5528
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:29 am
Gender: Female
Location: The Spirals

Re: The Japanese Language

Post by SnowCat »

Clearly, everything I know about Japanese, I learned from watching television. I do know that Farsi has no female gender in the language. I used to work with a nurse from Iran. People got upset because in her speech pattern, everything was masculine.

Snow
Daughter of Sekhmet

User avatar
Becks
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:50 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Vancouver Island

Re: The Japanese Language

Post by Becks »

I have been thinking about this talk of prescision in the Japanese language, and I think it actually depends on how you define precision. I have a similar view as Snow, and for me-I don't think about prescision as being something found in the mechanics of the language, pronouns etc, but rather in the meaning of the words. For example kinsukuroi....the broken pottery that is repaired with gold, and made more beautiful for having been broken. Its imperfection carries a special kind of beauty....and that's in just one word.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/danieldalton/ir ... md1mKEPo5l

Here's a few more single words that don't exist in English-that I feel the Japanese have totally rocked. ::coolglasses::
I think it just depends on how you operationally define prescision, and where the prescision is found.

Other languages have some great words too. One of my favourites is "kosleig". It's Norwegian, and it's more than cozy.....it's that special kind of warmth that comes from being snug and content in the heart. It could be the way a friend makes you feel, a warm sweater, or reading a book warm inside when it's snowy/rainy/awful outside.

User avatar
Kassandra
Posts: 3394
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by Kassandra »

.


The nineteenth century saw the demise of the Samurai statesmen in Japan. The cost of maintaining highly trained armies to defend themselves in civil conflicts became cost prohibitive. Prior to becoming politically activated the Samurai were some of the most proficient fighting machines in the known world. They had a culture based on honor, which they revered. Source: http://www.wizzed.com/15-of-the-rarest- ... n-history/


Samurai circa 1860-1880.jpg
.

User avatar
Kassandra
Posts: 3394
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy

Have Gaman!

Post by Kassandra »

.



Gaman (我慢) is a Japanese term of Zen Buddhist origin which means "enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity". The term is generally translated as "perseverance," "patience," tolerance, or "self-denial." At one point in Japanese culture, this had been foundational to every aspect of life --business, personal relationships, etc. (I don't know if that still applies today).

"You must have gaman." Ugh, I grew up hearing my mom say this to me, almost daily, no joke. It was kind of annoying for an American kid to hear, as we are taught to have an impatient, individualistic, "me first" attitude here in the West (it seems at times "I'll take you to court!" is almost as frequent as "hello" here, lol).

But now that I'm older, I appreciate the wisdom of gaman. It serves me more than not (...or am I serving it?). Takei-san provides a heartfelt, concise summary of the concept here:


phpBB [video]

User avatar
corvidus
Posts: 1032
Joined: Mon May 18, 2015 7:57 pm
Gender: Male
Location: Bridger Mountains

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by corvidus »

Kassandra wrote:.
* Swordsmanship info (for example, show us your cool katana collection, or the cool katana collection you'd love to own if you could ever afford it)
I'll take you up on this one. Ever since I heard about this katana, I've been daydreaming about it. I want one loveface The Tentetsutou, or, The Sword of Heaven. Forged from a meteorite by the famous Yoshindo Yoshiwara.

Image

User avatar
Kassandra
Posts: 3394
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by Kassandra »

.


Interesting. You know, I saw in an article the other day a knife that King Tut may have worn on his thigh, that likewise was made of meteorite material.





.

User avatar
corvidus
Posts: 1032
Joined: Mon May 18, 2015 7:57 pm
Gender: Male
Location: Bridger Mountains

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by corvidus »

I saw that too. His breastplate was impressive as well, the one with the Libyan Desert Glass Meteorite carved into a scarab.

User avatar
firebirdflys
Forum Manager
Forum Manager
Posts: 8086
Joined: Tue May 10, 2011 12:03 am
Gender: Female
Location: So. Cal.

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by firebirdflys »

I'm curious,
When someone from this culture doesn't grasp gaman are they berated in any way?
FF
Image

User avatar
Kassandra
Posts: 3394
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by Kassandra »

.


Well, my mom berated me (but I'm not from her culture, lol) if I didn't adhere to it. But, she was my mom, so I guess she was just doing her mom job best she knew how.

I can't speak for what any other household, situation or people would or wouldn't do, though, don't know.




.

User avatar
firebirdflys
Forum Manager
Forum Manager
Posts: 8086
Joined: Tue May 10, 2011 12:03 am
Gender: Female
Location: So. Cal.

Peace Crane

Post by firebirdflys »

Yeah, I have a feeling someone I know didn't grasp it and has yet to hear the end of it. It must have been hard to try and integrate old ways of doing, with new American culture.

I found something that is interesting, not sure if this is the proper place, but in a way it fell in line with our peace/love moon.
It blends and old tradition with a new purpose.
THE PAPER CRANE AND PEACE.
Cranes at the Peace Garden in Hiroshima
Cranes at the Peace Garden in Hiroshima
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-r ... 87670.html


Maybe you have already posted this and I missed it.
Bb, Firebird
Image

User avatar
Kassandra
Posts: 3394
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy

Re: Things Japanese Part I: Traditional Culture

Post by Kassandra »

.


Nice peace crane post, FF, thanks.




.

Post Reply

Return to “For Everyone”