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Seidkonacat's Fróðleikr-Bók

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Seidkonacat's Fróðleikr-Bók

Postby seidkonacat » Mon Feb 24, 2014 9:47 pm

I work mainly in the Norse tradition, hence the title of my post here.

"Fróðleikr-Bók" means "book of wisdom" or "book of magic" in old Norse. I could call it a "Gríma-Bók" or a "Skína-Bók" both of which would mean "Shadow Book" or "Book of Shadows", but the word Gríma, while technically means "shadow," also carries connotations of something being hidden or a mask over something. "Skína" is a little less certain in it's own etymology, and also means "to shine" in some contexts so I didn't feel that was appropriate either.

The word "Fróð," (pronounced "frowth") means "wisdom" but also stories and histories. A "Fróðleikr" is like a collection of knowledge. This book will probably be as much about information and lore as it will be about magic, so it seemed appropriate.

Expect more soon.

:3
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Re: Seidkonacat's Fróðleikr-Bók

Postby seidkonacat » Tue Feb 25, 2014 9:12 pm

When in danger,

Trace the sign of Thor's hammer, Mjolnir, in the air (an upside-down T) and imagine yourself in three concentric circles of protective power. Say or think, three times,

"With the aid of Thor
I stand in circles of light
that none may cross"
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Herb Lore--Parsley

Postby seidkonacat » Thu Mar 27, 2014 11:51 am

A bit of herb lore about parsley.

In European tradition, parsley was often associated with the dead. High medieval sources claimed that its roots had to grow to Hell and back seven times before it would sprout. This may be a reference to the fact that it is notoriously difficult to sprout and takes a lot of care and hard work to get going. (As a gardener myself, I understand.)

However, this common saying, this bit of folk-lore, may have its roots in an older Pagan tradition. Parsley is often associated with the dead. It was used in funeral rites by the Greeks, possibly associated with Persephone. It's sometimes considered unlucky to transplant parsley, with the preferred method being to grow it from seeds (which is notoriously hard to do and takes a long time, possibly giving rise to the earlier saying). English folklore associates it with marriage and love in a somewhat negative light. It appears it could be used to end love in some manner, or to cross lovers. The Romans, on the other hand, used it to bless weddings.

If one should ever be unfortunate enough as to encounter the Wild Hunt, the huntsmen and huntswomen may be appeased by an offer of parsley. It will also possibly appease malevolent-minded draugr and hagbui. It can also be used as an offering to various goddesses, gods, and spirits, particularly those who deal with death, such as Odin, Freya, Hel, or even some land-wights (vaettir).

It can be used in rituals as a symbol of both death and rebirth.

Sources:
My own memory (because this isn't an academic paper, dammit, and sometimes you just pick things up in odd places)
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/p/parsle09.html
http://www.mythologydictionary.com/wild ... ology.html
http://www.ourherbgarden.com/herb-history/parsley.html
http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ghosts.shtml
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On the Nature of Magic

Postby seidkonacat » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:12 pm

"Magic shall be written upon the sky by the rain
but they shall not be able to read it;
Magic shall be written on the faces of the stony hills
but their minds shall not be able to contain it;
In winter the barren trees shall be a black writing
but they shall not understand it..."


Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke
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On the Fair Folk

Postby seidkonacat » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:14 pm

Too late the sons of Adam will cry, "Where are the children of the earth?"
Gone.
Look for,
but you shall not find them.
Weep,
for they are gone forever.


-Mike Mignola, Hellboy Vol. 3: The Chained Coffin and Others, a reference to the Fair Folk
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Knot Magic

Postby seidkonacat » Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:06 pm

A random knot-spell I remember from long ago. My Nana may have shown it to me; she was a Strega. It's a very vague memory. Still, here it is: you can use it with any cord, making either simple knots or complex ones (as if you are crocheting or using a lucet). Theoretically, you could even use it when braiding your hair.

This knot of one, the spell's begun
This knot of two, I make it true
This knot of three, so it shall be
This knot of four, the open door
This knot of five, the spell's alive
This knot of six, the spell is fixed
This knot of seven, by earth and heaven
This knot of eight, I call on fate
This knot of nine, this thing is mine.
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A Ljóðaháttr for Saga

Postby seidkonacat » Fri Apr 04, 2014 6:53 pm

(A Ljóðaháttr is a kind of ancient Norse poem. It is a four-line lyrical verse that uses alliteration and lift rather than rhyme or meter. This is a stab at one, though I need a lot more practice before I become good at them.)

Today was Springtime at her finest; I gave Saga
the first glorious branch of blooming Camellia
from the great green bush that grows under my window
Its perfume lingers still on Her altar
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The Four Elements in Old Norse

Postby seidkonacat » Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:03 pm

The Four Elements in Old Norse:

Earth: Jord

Wind: Vindr

Water: Logr

Fire: Aldrnari

sources:
English to Old Norse Dictionary
Old Norse Religion in Long-term Perspectives, ed. Anders Andrén, Kristina Jennbert, and Catharina Raudvere.
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Herb Lore--Oak

Postby seidkonacat » Tue Apr 08, 2014 8:54 pm

Oak:

The Oak is known as the king of trees for obvious reasons. Oaks are large and rough-barked, strong and sturdy. Their wood is called ironwood for its rigidity and toughness. Their roots go very deep. Different Oak species range across the world.

It is sacred wood, and associated with the souls of the dead. Coffins are traditionally constructed out of oak. It is hallowed to various thunder and storm Gods, including Thor and Zeus/Jupiter. It is associated with strength and endurance. To get rid of an ailment, walk in a circle three times around an oak tree. Oak twigs and acorns may be used to ward off evil. The Druids valued the oak very highly.

It also has masculine fertility associations.
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bits of wisdom i must remember

Postby seidkonacat » Wed Apr 09, 2014 10:30 pm

"I closed my eyes and lived in the dark
choosing not to to see that the world outside was sick
and running mad."

“When the world is turned, may you find your true nature.”

“There is a madness in you that feeds on the times. Between blood of birth and blood of death, there is life. This fight is now my life. What is yours? To laugh at hope? To live and die alone?”

"The world is not vile. Though some are, that are in it."

"Do as you please. you are free. But there is no freedom, except that which comes with money and power. If you know of any other kind, then you must run after it. Go."

'She gave her heart to fools and thieves...now she believes the world she longs for is finally at hand.'

"Only madmen oppose us now. I pray you are not mad."

"Have a care, we must all bend to the times. What will not bend may break."


-The Devil’s Whore. Channel 4, 2008, Martine Brant and Peter Flannery.
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On Gentleness

Postby seidkonacat » Wed Apr 16, 2014 6:29 pm

"Gentleness shown once is mercy, shown twice is folly.”

― Naomi Novik, Black Powder War
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On The Worth of One's Consciousness

Postby seidkonacat » Wed Apr 16, 2014 6:31 pm

“He could not help a certain resentment that a conscience seemed to be so very expensive, and yet had no substantial form which one might admire, and display to one’s company.”

― Naomi Novik, Victory of Eagles
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On Rules and Etiquette, and How One Stays Sane

Postby seidkonacat » Wed Apr 16, 2014 6:33 pm

"(She) had generally considered the laws of etiquette as the rules of the chase, and divided them into categories: those which everyone broke, all the time; those which one could not break without being frowned at; and those which caused one to be quietly and permanently left out of every future invitation to the field.”

― Naomi Novik, Fast Ships, Black Sails
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Wisdom from a professor

Postby seidkonacat » Wed Apr 30, 2014 6:16 pm

"Always keep in mind the motivation
behind the creation
of information."


-Dr. Tsacoyianis
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Re: Seidkonacat's Fróðleikr-Bók

Postby seidkonacat » Tue May 20, 2014 8:33 pm

I've been feeling very solitary lately. I go to work, I interact with my family, but the rest of the time I spend alone.

My lover has been dead for four months. I'm still not over it.

At least once a week, I drive into state park lands and wander through the woods, taking the least-traveled, most-overgrown trails. I tie my hair back, wear long pants and boots and gloves. I ramble off the trail, forging my own path. I carry only my survival pack--knife, water bottle, notebook, compass, lighter, mosquito repellent, and small cloth bags I made myself for collecting samples of wild herbs and edible plants I come across.

I sit under trees and climb them to read. I identify plants, gather flowers, and examine insects. I nibble wild blackberries before the deer get to them. I spot a white-tailed deer in the distance, watch her for awhile, shift my weight onto a stick, and she bounds off. I see a red-tailed hawk swoop onto a squirrel and kill it, tearing into its flesh. I'm unafraid--there are no big predators in these woods. I almost wish there were.

I am at my most peaceful in these wild places. I let myself be sad. I let myself weep, or explore, or simply sit and be and watch. This is the hardest time of my life. For the first time, I am most calm in the wild places.

I remember my lover. I weep.
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