*~* Witchcraft and Wicca Forum *~* EUTM


Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

For discussion and questions about Gods and Goddesses.

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Xiao Rong » Wed May 14, 2014 11:28 am

I am still updating this thread with resources as I come across them. One question I feel like gets bounced around a lot is, if I consider myself a skeptic, can I still practice magic? Well, today at Humanistic Paganism, AtheistWitch writes about An Atheist's Magical Practice, which is an excellent post about how one witch reconciles his skeptical tendencies with a magical practice. Actually, I did link this post in my very first post, but rereading the essay reminded me about the importance of the question. I highly encourage you to read the post in full at the link (I wish I could just quote the entire article, but alas, I don't think it wise).

In particular, I want to highlight this explanation of magic:

... Since the only defensible logical explanation for magic is the psychological effect it creates on a person, that is always the model I assume to be at play. Magic changes my mindset; my mindset changes my probabilities of successfully manifesting my will in my life. It works by reconciling the rational and the irrational parts of myself. Take a protection charm for instance. A braid of garlic, a bag of herbs or a piece of metal, in and of itself, doesn’t protect me from anything. But if I use it as a protection charm, it reminds my rational brain to be vigilant, which helps me avoid avoidable danger. But it also appeases my irrational side by acting as if the piece of metal or bag of herbs will protect me from unavoidable danger. My irrational side is an heirloom from some hairy caveman who screeched and ran when he heard the “angry” thunderstorm. That irrational side is where uncontrollable emotional breakdowns come from. With magic, I gave that irrational side a more productive job to do so that I don’t have to simply repress it. That way all of me can work towards the same goal. It’s a virtuous cycle of self-fulfilling prophecy.
~ Xiao Rong ~ 小蓉 ~ Little Lotus ~
User avatar
Xiao Rong
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3440
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:58 am
Location: New England
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby loona wynd » Thu May 15, 2014 9:56 am

For me I don't know if I ever actually questioned the existences of Gods or not. It's something that I've always just felt was there. Basically I knew there had to be some sort of forces behind everything. So for me the ideas of Gods and spirits just seemed natural.
User avatar
loona wynd
Banned Member
 
Posts: 1410
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 7:27 pm
Location: Bath Maine
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Xiao Rong » Thu May 15, 2014 1:42 pm

loona wynd wrote:For me I dont know if I ever actually questioned the existences of Gods or not. Its something that I've always just felt was there. Basically I knew there had to be some sort of forces behind everything. So for me the ideas of Gods and spirits just seemed natural.


Not everyone grows up the same way, and I think if you grow up in a secular/atheist family, coming to Paganism presents a different set of challenges than, say, former Christians who become Pagan. I grew up in an atheist family; in particular, my dad is a very hardcore atheist who hates anything that smacks of the ceremonial, supernatural or religious even in the least. So during my childhood, we had very little that resembled a ritual and any talk of spirituality was quickly squashed; the only acceptable way of thinking was through science and materialism (reality consists of nothing but physical matter). I am of the opinion that as children we all have that sense of dream-like wonder of the universe and a sort of unquestioning acceptance that, properly nurtured, are what gets structured into spirituality, faith, or religious belief. When that gets quashed at a very early age, it takes a lot of work to build it back up again.

Incorporating ritual, practice, and spirituality into my life is still very much an ongoing process for me, since I did not grow up with personal experience participating in rituals or talking about the supernatural; they are still to some degree quite foreign to me -- to me, it's a little comparable to learning a second language. Plus, at every turn I have that little inner skeptic voice telling me that all this is mumbo jumbo nonsense that is irrational and not real.

My process thus far has been:

1. To reconcile that I can hold multiple competing truths at the same time

2. To realize that sometimes it's less about what's literally true in a materialistic sense and what I need to believe in (for example, understanding that the crow flying by is a completely random occurrence, yet simultaneously being able to accept that the crow crossing my path at this specific moment has a special significance for me that is non-random)

3. To learn that having the mystery and unknowable in my life is not a bad thing; whereas the ideology of the Enlightenment would say that any gaps in knowledge represents ignorance that needs to be conquered, I can recognize that there are some things that are better off not known and the mystery makes my life more, not less, complete (part of Paganism for me is valuing the dark and the light)

4. That there are other ways of knowing beyond pure logic and scientific reasoning that are valid and are equally, if not more, important in helping us understand who we are in relation to the rest of the world.


That's why I hope to provide this thread as a resource for people who grow up in circumstances like mine; because the journey to Paganism looks very different when you are coming to it from an entirely secular/atheist standpoint. Certain things such as being able to feel the presence of deities and spirits are things that I imagine come more naturally if you grew up in a religious household. To people who didn't have such a background, "believing in" deities may not ever be possible, and I also don't believe it to be a necessary step towards having a holistic and healthy spirituality.
~ Xiao Rong ~ 小蓉 ~ Little Lotus ~
User avatar
Xiao Rong
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3440
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:58 am
Location: New England
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Seraphin_npocampo » Thu May 15, 2014 9:16 pm

So I believe it would be great to just take stock of what we know. What does our experience tells us. I've been asked by many; Do you believe in God/Goddess? How do you define Him/Her? The human perception appears limited enough without shrinking it any further or cutting off the greater dimensions of our perception. To me, it comes down to how we relate to our Deities or Highest Ideals and how we communicate or interact with the One Consciousness, the One Body, One Mind, One Soul, One Spirit through our innate capacity to communicate with all the stuff of the universe.

I'm a polytheist and people are asking me how do I make contact with all of The Gods and Goddesses I worship and work with. I have said to those folks that the Deities will reach you where you can reach Them. How we experience this communication is again as unique as every individual. I'Ve found that connection to be the clearest when I'm being mindful of my spirit essence. The latter cycle of my soul journey was spent in general solitude. In stillness, I find my way to my Deities.

I know a lot of people here are working with Deities or the Highest Ideal, or Cosmos or Universe differently than I do like you Xiao Rong and I believe your and others' way, whatever is that is equally valid as mine.

If it helps any; it's our experience. To this I often offer to people to consider our beliefs and decide whether the belief they cling to is our own and of our own experience or the best explanation or idea they can accept that is expressed by someone else.

"Don't let other peoples limitations become your highest expectations."

I have a lot of friends from our Pagan circle that consider themselves as Atheist Pagan. Magick for them, doesn't need Divine contact or invocation. However, they believed that "magick" is a principal technique for achieving a certain goal, and a way for them to use and listen to their subconscious mind. They believe the system of nature is self-contained and has its natural laws. Every magickal effect has its natural cause. They believe both Magick and Nature run on their own, independent from the Gods and Goddesses.

While magick suggests an image of someone stirring a bubbling cauldron, murmuring invocations of Deities with eyes closed and candles burning, magick as they believe, comprises a wide variety of practices. And I agree that magick involves harnessing the dynamics of the mind in order to perceive and use things in a more mindful and intentional, less random or accidental manner.

There's a limited amount of accounts on the Atheistic Paganism or Magick, perhaps because some folks considered their crafts too difficult to practice or perhaps even dangerous when they are uninitiated and unguided by their Deities or some Higher Spirits. However, research has uncovered enough clues to convince us that some of the mystics of the past relied on various magickal techniques just to advance their mental practices without immediate recourse to the Higher Worlds.

For those who work with Gods like me, Magick is a channel to the understanding of the uses of both spirit forces and Divine forces around us. However, for some who don't believe in Deities, Magick empowers and imbues them with a subtle energy which isn't necessarily as Divine.

Thanks for the inspiration to share.
Seraphin

If you have any questions, please feel free to PM me.
User avatar
Seraphin_npocampo
 
Posts: 2160
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 11:17 pm
Location: EUTM's dungeon, keeping a dragon egg in a pot over a fireplace!
Gender: Male

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby loona wynd » Sat May 17, 2014 11:31 am

Xiao Rong wrote:Not everyone grows up the same way, and I think if you grow up in a secular/atheist family, coming to Paganism presents a different set of challenges than, say, former Christians who become Pagan.
This is a good and fair point. It was just something that I thought of in reflection to this thread. It just made sense to me that there would be a force behind the things in life. Like something has to tell flowers how to grow, how birds know how to fly and the like. There was something behind the instincts in plants and animals, and there was something behind the forces of star creation beyond the scientific meanings. To me it made even further sense that there would be Gods and other forces around when I learned about the Big Bang theory. I figured something had to be the force behind the Big Bang. Why not spirits or divine beings? Something had to make the big bang occur.
Xiao Rong wrote: I grew up in an atheist family; in particular, my dad is a very hardcore atheist who hates anything that smacks of the ceremonial, supernatural or religious even in the least. So during my childhood, we had very little that resembled a ritual and any talk of spirituality was quickly squashed; the only acceptable way of thinking was through science and materialism (reality consists of nothing but physical matter).
That seems a very dull way to think and be raised. I mean where is the sense of wonder? I have honestly tried to view life through the idea and concept that only what is physical is real. I have tried to view the world through only the modern science and technology views. It just never seemed to work. I had to many questions that science didn't have the answer for. So I stopped trying. I have at least been able to develop a respect for that view, even if I can't wrap my head around it (not without trying). I do often ask atheists questions about spirituality and the like and through some of them I have been able to try an gain a better understanding of that world view.

The only time I actually lost my belief was after my grandmother died of cancer. I questioned God (Christian God) about why he would take such a loving and caring person away from those who really needed her. I was filled with hate and anger. So I despised him and his faith. Granted I was also start my studied as a witch at the same time, so it was a mixed bag.

I think the best way to describe that part of my life was agnostic. I figured there was something out there but because of my anger towards Christianity and their God I wasn't sure what was out there. I felt something but wasn't sure what.
Xiao Rong wrote:I am of the opinion that as children we all have that sense of dream-like wonder of the universe and a sort of unquestioning acceptance that, properly nurtured, are what gets structured into spirituality, faith, or religious belief. When that gets quashed at a very early age, it takes a lot of work to build it back up again.
I would have to agree. I would have to describe the way I was raised (within the context of Christaintiy) as more spiritual than religious. While God was talked about and believed in, the overall teachings I received from my parents were more focused on nature connections and respect for the earth. Neither of my parents were religious, but they were spiritual. My mother is one of those who believe that children should be raised with a sense of religion and spirituality to a certain age (basically early teens) and then be allowed to make their own decisions.

Xiao Rong wrote:Incorporating ritual, practice, and spirituality into my life is still very much an ongoing process for me, since I did not grow up with personal experience participating in rituals or talking about the supernatural; they are still to some degree quite foreign to me -- to me, it's a little comparable to learning a second language. Plus, at every turn I have that little inner skeptic voice telling me that all this is mumbo jumbo nonsense that is irrational and not real.
I have that voice in my ear from time to time as well. I think we all do honestly. For me its a large part due to the culture we live in, where spirituality as a whole and magic especially is laughed at. With the world being more and more in the "show me the evidence" view its often hard to believe in and practice something like magic that can't be proven. The one thing I have done to keep this in check is hold a belief and understanding of magic that is both spiritual and psychological based. Psychologically it comes from a place like the one you mentioned. Spiritually it comes from a different source, though I have the mind tied to the spirit so for me it works both ways.

Xiao Rong wrote:My process thus far has been:

1. To reconcile that I can hold multiple competing truths at the same time

2. To realize that sometimes it's less about what's literally true in a materialistic sense and what I need to believe in (for example, understanding that the crow flying by is a completely random occurrence, yet simultaneously being able to accept that the crow crossing my path at this specific moment has a special significance for me that is non-random)

3. To learn that having the mystery and unknowable in my life is not a bad thing; whereas the ideology of the Enlightenment would say that any gaps in knowledge represents ignorance that needs to be conquered, I can recognize that there are some things that are better off not known and the mystery makes my life more, not less, complete (part of Paganism for me is valuing the dark and the light)

4. That there are other ways of knowing beyond pure logic and scientific reasoning that are valid and are equally, if not more, important in helping us understand who we are in relation to the rest of the world.
Thank you for sharing your process. I personally like numbers three and four. There are things that science teaches us that religion/spirituality doesn't (like the way to body works-biology and chemistry) and there are things religion teaches that science doesn't (creation, spiritual reality, etc). This is why I believe its important to accept both religion/spirituality and science in our lives. I believe that the school compliment each other. There is no reason to accept evolution and deny creation. They can be beliefs side by side. I think this is part of what you mean in #1.


Xiao Rong wrote:That's why I hope to provide this thread as a resource for people who grow up in circumstances like mine; because the journey to Paganism looks very different when you are coming to it from an entirely secular/atheist standpoint. Certain things such as being able to feel the presence of deities and spirits are things that I imagine come more naturally if you grew up in a religious household. To people who didn't have such a background, "believing in" deities may not ever be possible, and I also don't believe it to be a necessary step towards having a holistic and healthy spirituality.
This is true. I don't think we need to believe in deities. I don't even believe that being pagan requires a belief in any forces outside of oneself. To me being a pagan is essentially not following the three major religions (Judaism, Islam and Christianity).

I realize that many atheists don't consider themselves pagan, and if they asked me to not call them that I wouldn't. Though I have found that being an atheist doesn't necessarily mean that they deny all spiritual forces and practices. I've met several atheists who don't believe in deities, but believe in energetic forces of change in the universe. Others believe in a spirit of sorts, sort of like a collective unconscious. Some (they call themselves hard atheists) dont believe in anything not material. Like any other type of theology and spiritual practices atheism does come in different forms. So for these reasons I consider atheists to be a type of pagan, even if its not religious or spiritual. For them science is their answer and working with science helps them understand the world around them. And honestly I believe that spirituality is really about understanding ourselves and our place in the universe. So I do see science as really an acceptable spiritual path-if one defines spirituality as a connection with the universe and yourself through personal understanding and exploration.

I also don't believe that belief is necessary for magic or spiritual practices. One of my favorite sayings is actually "A witch doesn't believe. They know". basically this statement is about through personal experiences we dont need to believe in our Gods and spirit forces. We know that they exist because we have experienced them. Which this actually fits basically any path and truth. Through experience we "know" our truths.

That is one of the reasons I have loved this thread. You have given several ways that atheists can practice magic and spirituality without Gods, and have also provided several different ways to understand the universe without Gods. Sometimes I go back and forth between belief in the Gods as individual beings and them as simply forces in the universe. I know that energy is real. I just can't always define its form.

Does this make sense?
User avatar
loona wynd
Banned Member
 
Posts: 1410
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 7:27 pm
Location: Bath Maine
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Xiao Rong » Mon May 19, 2014 10:25 am

There is a limited amount of accounts on the Atheistic Paganism or Magick, perhaps because some folks considered their crafts too difficult to practice or perhaps even dangerous when they are uninitiated and unguided by their Deities or some Higher Spirits


I generally have not heard of this either. That might be true in a few cases, but I think that if you don't believe/experience the supernatural, it feels just as meaningless to pray to a deity as it is to try to concoct a love spell, not because it feels uncomfortable practicing without the guidance of a deity. Although of course there are many non-theist Pagans who both call upon deities (usually as a metaphor/archetype) and pracitce magic, without believing the supernatural.

@ Loona:

This is a good and fair point. It was just something that I thought of in reflection to this thread. It just made sense to me that there would be a force behind the things in life. Like something has to tell flowers how to grow, how birds know how to fly and the like. There was something behind the instincts in plants and animals, and there was something behind the forces of star creation beyond the scientific meanings. To me it made even further sense that there would be Gods and other forces around when I learned about the Big Bang theory. I figured something had to be the force behind the Big Bang. Why not spirits or divine beings? Something had to make the big bang occur.


I know many non-theist Pagans also intuit a force behind the things in life, but not necessarily as an anthropomorphic being who needs worship, like gods in the traditional sense -- which could be pantheism, I guess.

Xiao Rong wrote:I grew up in an atheist family; in particular, my dad is a very hardcore atheist who hates anything that smacks of the ceremonial, supernatural or religious even in the least. So during my childhood, we had very little that resembled a ritual and any talk of spirituality was quickly squashed; the only acceptable way of thinking was through science and materialism (reality consists of nothing but physical matter).


That seems a very dull way to think and be raised. I mean where is the sense of wonder? I have honestly tried to view life through the idea and concept that only what is physical is real. I have tried to view the world through only the modern science and technology views. It just never seemed to work. I had to many questions that science didn't have the answer for. So I stopped trying. I have at least been able to develop a respect for that view, even if I can't wrap my head around it (not without trying). I do often ask atheists questions about spirituality and the like and through some of them I have been able to try an gain a better understanding of that world view.


Oh, super dull! That's why I didn't stick with it; I've always grown up craving ritual and magic, wanting it to be real even if I couldn't believe in it at the time. However, I will say (as I mentioned above) that there are people who find that they don't need anything more than science, because it already opens up so much wonder and mystery in just the complexity of the universe, that gods seem unnecessary. I can't remember who said it, but it was something like: some people might see the number 7 and be like, oh, how dull, it's a number; numbers are just ways to reduce the universe into discrete, boring parts. And others might see 7 and be like, HOLY CRAP, 7 is a NUMBER, and NUMBERS let us understand so much of the universe! Is there anything more magical than a NUMBER? (Sorry to whoever said this first; I thoroughly mangled the quote, but you get the idea).

There are things that science teaches us that religion/spirituality doesn't (like the way to body works-biology and chemistry) and there are things religion teaches that science doesn't (creation, spiritual reality, etc). This is why I believe its important to accept both religion/spirituality and science in our lives.


Agreed! I think both are important. I see science as telling us what the world is like, and spirituality as answering the question of who we are and what we are meant to be in the world. Clearly you are lost if you are missing either (or both, Goddess forbid).

And honestly I believe that spirituality is really about understanding ourselves and our place in the universe. So I do see science as really an acceptable spiritual path-if one defines spirituality as a connection with the universe and yourself through personal understanding and exploration.


Well said!

I also don't believe that belief is necessary for magic or spiritual practices. One of my favorite sayings is actually "A witch doesn't believe. They know". basically this statement is about through personal experiences we dont need to believe in our Gods and spirit forces. We know that they exist because we have experienced them. Which this actually fits basically any path and truth. Through experience we "know" our truths.


Right! I am touched by a quote from Starhawk, from her famous The Spiral Dance:

People often ask me if I believe in the Goddess. I reply ‘Do you believe in rocks?’ It is extremely difficult for most Westerners to grasp the concept of a manifest deity. The phrase ‘believe in’ itself implies that we cannot know the Goddess, that She is somehow intangible, incomprehensible. But we do not believe in rocks we may see them, touch them, [...] In the Craft, we do not believe in the Goddess we connect with Her; through the moon, the stars, the ocean, the earth, through trees, animals, through other human beings, through ourselves.


I find that the concept of manifest deities is a helpful way to get around the icky issue of "believing in" God(dess), which is a particularly Protestant Christian religious tenet. I don't need to believe in the sun and the moon to honor them, because I see them every day. I think this is one way in which non-theists often connect to the Divine -- some things you don't need faith, you just know.

That is one of the reasons I have loved this thread. You have given several ways that atheists can practice magic and spirituality without Gods, and have also provided several different ways to understand the universe without Gods. Sometimes I go back and forth between belief in the Gods as individual beings and them as simply forces in the universe. I know that energy is real. I just can't always define its form.


Glad you like the thread! And as for the Gods as individual beings vs. forces in the universe ... why not both?
~ Xiao Rong ~ 小蓉 ~ Little Lotus ~
User avatar
Xiao Rong
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3440
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:58 am
Location: New England
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Luna87 » Wed Jan 21, 2015 5:25 am

I am a animism, Hard-polytheism, solitary eclectic witch and influence greatly my Mom and grandmothers traditions as witches wich has been passed on for generations :)
User avatar
Luna87
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2015 9:19 am
Location: Norway
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Lady_Lilith » Fri Jan 01, 2016 7:36 pm

This is a great post for people being introduced to paganism. I know quite a few secular witches and spiritual atheists, so it's nice to see that these are to be addressed.

I also like the four types of paganism categories, because it reminds me of studying religion which many of these things can be applicable across the board.
"Often I will spin a tale, never will I charge a fee. I'll amuse you an entire eve, but, alas, you won't remember me. What am I?" -Sloth
User avatar
Lady_Lilith
 
Posts: 850
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2015 9:26 pm
Location: 9th layer of the underworld
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Dr_Sir » Mon Feb 29, 2016 3:03 am

Thanks very much Xiao, very thought provoking and well written, you really helped me out here
missionaries dismiss me for my single epiphany
The diff between him and me is a simple sip of British Tea!
So when times are hard and life is rough,
You can stick the kettle on and find me a cup
User avatar
Dr_Sir
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 5:58 am
Location: London, UK
Gender: Male

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Katrinkah » Fri Mar 11, 2016 12:45 am

AWESOME! Thanks so much this was very informative. I think I've been practicing pantheism, but I've calling myself Wiccan. Am I not technically a Wiccan? I liked calling myself Wiccan....
User avatar
Katrinkah
 
Posts: 678
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2016 9:45 pm
Location: TX
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Lady_Lilith » Fri Mar 11, 2016 3:08 am

Katrinkah wrote:AWESOME! Thanks so much this was very informative. I think I've been practicing pantheism, but I've calling myself Wiccan. Am I not technically a Wiccan? I liked calling myself Wiccan....

Wicca is based in orthopraxy or right practice, not right belief. I am a monist and my teacher is a soft monotheist. There is def atheist Wiccans, I have met them.
"Often I will spin a tale, never will I charge a fee. I'll amuse you an entire eve, but, alas, you won't remember me. What am I?" -Sloth
User avatar
Lady_Lilith
 
Posts: 850
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2015 9:26 pm
Location: 9th layer of the underworld
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Katrinkah » Fri Mar 11, 2016 3:17 am

Lady_Lilith wrote:Wicca is based in orthopraxy or right practice, not right belief. I am a monist and my teacher is a soft monotheist. There is def atheist Wiccans, I have met them.


Oh Ok. This makes me feel better, thanks!
User avatar
Katrinkah
 
Posts: 678
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2016 9:45 pm
Location: TX
Gender: Female

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Shekinah » Fri Mar 11, 2016 10:39 pm

-Dark-Moon- wrote:I love your posts, Xiao. Very thoughtfully written.

I might add that the ancient Hindu texts the Rig Veda state that 'We created the Gods' and that thus they are simply divine projections of ourselves.

'Magic/ritual' is simply one method we use for access to them.

The only thing that can be truly known in this incomprehensible universe, is ourselves. We, our consciousness, our experience, is the universe.

Out of the void, we are the creator.

We are 'God'.

Wonderful insight Dark Moon. The Pantheon are thought beings of our creation materialized by visualization and conjuration by practitioners of our art over tens of thousands of years. These require our recurrent mental energies and thusly they are eager to work with us. Collectively the life phenomenon across the space/time is entangled as Spirit. A pre-existent God did not create the multiverse but rather the multiverse via the life phenomenon is evolving a God.
Truth and Reality are highly guarded secrets. Nothing is as it appears. "The ONENESS sleeps in the stone, breathes in the plant, dreams in the animal and awakens in man" (Indian proverb)
User avatar
Shekinah
 
Posts: 463
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 9:16 am
Location: USA
Gender: Male

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby WiccanWitch » Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:56 pm

I wouldn't see pantheism as atheism. In fact the complete opposite. As the word implies atheistic is lack of a deity altogether. Pantheism suggests a deity that is all encompassing.
User avatar
WiccanWitch
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:06 pm

Re: Paganism: When There Aren't Any Gods

Postby Katrinkah » Sun Mar 13, 2016 4:09 am

WiccanWitch wrote:I wouldn't see pantheism as atheism. In fact the complete opposite. As the word implies atheistic is lack of a deity altogether. Pantheism suggests a deity that is all encompassing.


I agree.
User avatar
Katrinkah
 
Posts: 678
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2016 9:45 pm
Location: TX
Gender: Female

PreviousNext

Return to Gods/Goddesses

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests