*~* Witchcraft and Wicca Forum *~* EUTM


Origins of christmas?

While she isn't offering readings here, she's happy to help answer questions you may have about folk magic, psychic abilities, and general spirituality.

Origins of christmas?

Postby Rainbowkiss » Thu Dec 12, 2013 10:46 am

I read somewhere that christmas's real name is Yule and that it is a pagan holiday: Is this true?
Rainbowkiss
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 3:17 pm

Re: Origins of christmas?

Postby TheGirlOfSecrets » Thu Dec 12, 2013 2:25 pm

Ok, I'm sure people can answer this question in more detail, but here goes...

Witches celebrate the wheel of the year, the 8 sabbats. You can look them up if you want. And Yule/Winter Solstice is one of them.

Ok, so basically, Yule/Winter Solstice is a celebration of the winter. Yule/Winter Solstice and Christmas are very similar, the same principles, but different meanings. Christians celebrate the birth of Christ, and Witches celebrate the coming of winter. I don't want to be biased, because I have been a Christian as well as a Witch, and I respect all religions.

So I wouldn't say that the Christians stole the holiday away from Witches, but I think because Witches came before Christians, the Christians wanted to kind of, cover up the idea of Witchcraft, because apparently Christianity is the only right way, and everyone else are going to hell and are Satanists (and I don't see anything wrong with Satanism anyway). A lot of people I have seen had said that if Jesus was born he would've been born in the Spring! Lol, but anyways, I think the Christians wanted to blend in the two celebrations and hope that people would follow them. This was pretty jumbled up, and I hope you understand me lol, and I'm sure people will be able to explain a lot better than me, I'm very distracted. I know what I mean, I just can't get it into words... I hope this helps, if not um... sorry? Hope someone else can help you! Have a good night (or whatever, depending on the part of the world you live in lol). So yeah, blessed be : )
I am always never not broken.
User avatar
TheGirlOfSecrets
 
Posts: 156
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:39 am
Gender: Female

Re:

Postby Rainbowkiss » Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:25 pm

Thank you! Merry christmas
Rainbowkiss
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 3:17 pm

Re: Origins of christmas?

Postby Kassandra » Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:30 pm

TheGirlOfSecrets wrote:...the Christians wanted to kind of, cover up the idea of Witchcraft, because apparently Christianity is the only right way, and everyone else are going to hell...

Haha, that's straight to the point. Based on what I've studied on this topic, I would tend to agree.



TheGirlOfSecrets wrote:A lot of people I have seen had said that if Jesus was born he would've been born in the Spring!
Lol...I know what I mean, I just can't get it into words...

I think you did fine. I've read the same thing. I read that it was not the custom of shepherds in the Palestine area to have their sheep wandering around in the cold at that time of the year (they're in the Northern Hemisphere). They would have done that in the spring, when it got warm. Also, Yosef and Miryam (Joseph and Mary) wouldn't have been traveling for the Roman census "headcount" at that time of the year, either. Yeah, people who've researched this pretty much agree that that whole part of the story surrounding Yeshua's (Jesus') life is pretty much completely bogus.

But it seems the bogusity doesn't just end there (see my next post...) :wink2:


.
:fairy: bling ~ Have a magical day, now ~

Ask Kassandra
Find Balance
Awaken
User avatar
Kassandra
EUTM Support
EUTM Support
 
Posts: 3533
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy
Gender: Female

Christmas: One of Christianity's Ginormous Psy Ops

Postby Kassandra » Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:01 pm

.


Note: just wanted to say the following are conclusions based on what I have researched on this
topic over many years, and the conclusions I have drawn as a result of that research. It does not
necessarily, however, reflect the views of other members of this board, nor its owner.
Thanks.
:wink:



For most Christians, the Bible is like a software license. Nobody actually reads it; they just scroll to the bottom and click “I agree.”
–Actor, Forest Whitaker



Hi Rainbowkiss. Get a soda and put your feet up; this is a long post, as this is a complicated subject. Still, it's only scratching the surface of this debacle.



The Christian Psy Op

I wish the whole Christmas thing were as simple as Christians simply appropriating one pagan holiday, Yule, renaming it “Christmas,” and that was the end of that story. But, when you’re talking about a two thousand year old religion, you’re talking about there having been plenty of time for plenty of people to effect plenty of shenanigans, and pull the wool over plenty of peoples’ eyes quite nicely. The goal of any good psy op (“psychological operation” –get to know that military term very well, for there are many psy ops all around us, both ancient and modern) is either to extract valuable things from people (for instance, bilk them for money, or use them for sex, or any other such shenanigans), or to gain control over their behavior, control their lives...in most cases, it's both. The benefits of the two going hand-in-hand are obvious.

Christianity started out as a small, underground cult. Members had to meet secretly in each other's homes, or literally underground in catacombs (tombs) for their prayer services, etc. You think “The Burning Times” was bad for witches ...some might argue that, believe it or not and ironically enough (since it was Christians who were burning the witches, lol), Christians too were burned at the stake during the Roman Empire (before it was “Christianized”) when the cult first began. They were fed to lions or hacked up to pieces for entertainment in spectacular Roman colosseum shows (ancient version of our Superbowls, our World Cup soccer matches, etc. ...panem et circenses). Christians were pulled out of their houses and publically tortured, raped, beheaded and otherwise murdered onsite. They were impaled on poles at city limits to give visitors a subtle hint: “Christians Not Welcomed Here, So Park Your Loaves and Fishes at the Gate.” Yet, somehow the little cult kept growing. I think this is because the real message was a “power to the people” kind of thing which really spread like wildfire...


Image
He was caught in the middle. "Oy vey. What have I gotten myself
into this time...I shoulda' stayed in India." I really don't think the
rabbi intended to be deified and worshipped, to be equated with
God, and to have this huge, zany worldwide cult built around him.
In fact, I think he would have found this all utterly repulsive.




Fundamentalist Fearmongering “Back in the Day”

It seems to me that at that time, people in Israel practically had to give their left n-- …uh, arm, over to temples just to make it through the week, or else. There were unnecessary, strict religious protocols they had to follow daily, having to do with every little thing in their lives. If not, they would get “fined,” which in some instances meant corporeal punishment, if not death. Then, there were heavy alms they had to pay to the temples, on top of the taxes they already had to pay to the Roman Empire who would also punish them if they didn't comply. Rabbi Yeshua (“Jesus” is the Anglicized Greek translation of that name, and I don’t subscribe to using it just because everyone else does… :wink: ), or Yeshi for short (like Bill's short for William) was appalled because most people were just working class folks like his father. His father was just a carpenter, with a big family to feed. So, it seems that the unfairness of the socio-economic pressures that average people of that time and place faced really hit home with Yeshi. He made the mistake of speaking up about it.

In fact, most of the Hebrew populace were just farmers. They didn’t have the kind of money these greedy temples were sweating them for, and they couldn’t afford to just hand over their livestock as payment, either. But they were forced to do these things, or else the fundamentalist preachers of those days (aka the “temple priests,” who behaved like the "banksters" of Western society today, as they were not only the religious, but in some ways also the economic power brokers of their society) told them they’d be on bad terms with God if they didn't. That’s where Protestant Christians get the practice of “tithing” today, or Catholics get the concept of priestly “indulgences,” and so forth. It's all religious extortion, spiritual blackmail. I find it ironic how the very things their founder, “Jesus,” taught his followers not to do, are the very things they do today.


Image
That Yeshua, you know, Yosef's (Joseph) boy, we
gotta' get ridda' him. His big mouth is cuttin' into
our profits." "Yeah, he's a major pain in the tuchas!"



"Enough Already. We'll Get Rid of the Guy for You, OK?"

You could say the rabbi had a kind of “blue collar” point of view, and encouraged people not to buy into the temple system psy op anymore. He taught them, “You don’t need those guys. Just pray to God directly, and he’ll hear you. Don't let these guys scare you. Keep your money in your pockets.” That didn’t go over too well with the priests. It wasn’t the “Roman Empire” that executed him per se, it was the Hebrew priests. This is where we get the term, “I wash my hands of this situation.” The Roman emperor at the time washed his hands in front of the public at Yeshi’s (mock) trial and sentencing. He didn’t give a rat's... --eh, he didn’t care at all about the Jewish religion, either way. Emperors back then were soldiers, literally on the field with their armies, not squabbling about religious matters. They weren't sitting behind computers like today’s hi-tech generals. They weren't texting their subordinates, “Hey guys, what’s the status today out there on the battlefield?” between rounds of golf, or drinks with pretty ladies at officers' clubs. No, they were out there with their men. Rulers were not theologians, and stuff like this got on their last nerves.

They liked to leave petty things like this up to their “religious advisors” to decide. So, the whole Yeshua mess was the last thing on any Roman emperor’s mind. He asked the Jewish fundamentalists in the crowd, “What should I do here? What’s gonna’ make you guys happy?" His actual thought bubble, though, probably looked more like "Ugh, [face/palm and smh] for the love of Zeus on Mount Olympus, what's it gonna' take to shut you nutcases up so you'll get out of my face and go home?" He had an empire to run, so he executed Yeshi just to appease the priests, then “washed his hands” of it, and went about his day. A more contemporary parallel might be how Lincoln “freed the slaves” to keep the United States from splitting into two countries. Personally, I don’t think he actually cared either way about slavery. I think he, like that Roman emperor before him, needed to make a shrewd socio-political decision to hold his country together and not lose power, simple politics. Shucks, anybody who’s ever worked in management before could easily understand this mentality.






Those Infamous Policy-setting Councils

Wow, this council was a mess, as were all such policy-setting councils back then. Ugh, I would have to write a book to explain it all, but there’ve been plenty of books written about this already, so you could find the details if you look for them. Long-story-short (OK, it's still long, but) three hundred years after Yeshua's death, the Roman Empire, still in power, got smart and decided to “adopt” the still-growing "Jesus cult" as its official religion: "If you can't beat the peasants, join 'em." Again, this was just a shrewd, socio-economic move. To keep their newest power tool, “Christianity,” influential in the many lands that the empire conquered (and would continue to conquer), they had to add a few embellishments that had nothing whatsoever to do with the rabbi’s original teachings. That's what these councils were about, keeping the growing pagan-turned-Christian masses happy, so they were happy to convert, or at least not rebelwhen conversion was forced upon them.

Though I totally disagree with certain things the narrator of the video says, I do think the video gives a good glimpse of the longstanding, messy, soap opera that Christianity became only a few hundred year after "Jesus" died. Several things the narrator is not saying, though. For one, the policies that the bishops discussed included the adoption of pagan things into Christianity. So, for example the pagan goddess "Brighid," became the "Christian St. Bridgit," as would many other pagan gods and goddesses become likewise Christianized. Secondly, the ancient, traditional festivities in honor of these gods and goddesses were transformed into "feast days of the Saints," and other holidays. So, back to your question about Christmas just being Yule. Christmas as it's come to be celebrated today, as well as Easter, they are all a jumble of pagan beliefs and practices, merely given a "Christian spin."

Thirdly, he doesn't mention that the Church held many of these policy councils, not just this "Council of Nicea." So, though this particular council may not have decided, for example, which Bible books were "cannonical" and which were "apocryphal" (meaning, recognized by the church, and not recognized --not saying the unrecognized books aren't accurate, just not recognized), these things were decided at other councils. In fact, these councils also voted out such spiritual concepts as reincarnation, which was a long-held belief of most people in the ancient world. In Hebrew it's called, "gilgul." These councils outlawed any and all such spiritual beliefs whenever they interfered with the Church's ability to spiritually/financially extort people. So, in this case, if people knew that one's soul energy could come back to Earth again, and that the "hell fire and damnation" was just another "hoax policy" these councils made up), then they couldn't hold hell fire over the peoples' heads, and sweat them for money and services.

See, it's no coincidence the headquarters of the Mafia and the Catholic Church are both in the same country, and that they use similar tactics. When you think about it, the Mafia are actually the more honorable mobsters out of the two --at least they've never claimed to "represent God."


Image
The Church cleverly built an elaborate cult around Yeshua (a no-
name Jewish philosopher from Natz'rat [Nazareth]) almost complete-
ly based on the details of an ancient Persian cult hero who was al-
ready very popular long before Yeshua was even born: Mithra
!




Show Me the Money, and I Care Not Who You Worship

Some interesting secular quotes come to my mind...

“Let me issue and control a nation’s money and I care not who writes the laws" --Mayer Amschel Rothschild (1744-1812), founder of the House of Rothschild.

“The few who understand the system* will either be so interested in its profits or be so dependent upon its favours that there will be no opposition from that class, while on the other hand, the great body of people,** mentally incapable of comprehending the tremendous advantage that capital derives from the system, will bear its burdens without complaint, and perhaps without even suspecting that the system is inimical to their interests.” --The Rothschild brothers of London, in a correspondence to associates in New York, 1863.

*banksters and certain organizations, who cherish an illusion of the power they really don't possess, and are given pats on the head by powers much greater than they are
**sheeple

And finally, a more contemporary quote, what Mayer would probably say if he were alive today: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaiSHcHM0PA


So I believe all of this, and some further creative skewing done by a couple of 19th century writers, is how the "Christmas holiday" became what it is today. In fact, I would go so far as saying that, upon scrutiny, Christmas and all other supposedly Christian holidays have nothing to do with the teachings of the carpenter's son, who was merely making a few recommendations he hoped would improve the lot of his countrymen. I really don't think the rabbi intended to be deified and worshipped, to be equated with God, and to have this huge, zany worldwide cult built around him. In fact, my intuition feels that he would have found Christianity to be the antithesis of everything he believed in, and quite frankly, utterly repulsive. Worst of all, I think Christian leaders, past and present, all know the truth about the above, yet continue to, in my opinion, egregiously lie to their faithful followers...wolves in sheep's clothing, indeed. I find it sad, really.

I daresay that Christian holidays are really just money-making panem et circenses (after all, where would retailers be without their pre- and post-holiday "sales"?). I think appropriation of pagan practices and gods was one part of a ginormous, multi-tentacled "octopus" of a control system. For in whatever country they were in, the Church also had a policy of building their churches on sites which were already considered “holy” to the people, thereby gaining quicker acceptance, or at least a lack of real resistance. They would create many more money-making schemes in centuries to come. And I think the system they created was all a pre-cursor to the current Matrix control system in which we all now find ourselves "caught in the middle." This planet has been subjected to some fabulous web-spinners.


wolf in sheeps clothing.jpg
wolf in sheeps clothing.jpg (9.87 KiB) Viewed 1001 times
"Hehehe, Merry Christmas, suckers.
--With love, Wolfie. xxox"





Anyway, Moderator Xiao posted a link recently to an article about this topic. I have pasted half of it, below (you'll have to visit the site for full text). It was written by a pagan priest who enjoys researching this kind of thing. But alas, a few things on there that he deems in his cute “verdicts” as being Christian in origin, I could actually show that they’re pagan instead, and Christianity adopted those too. But, I don’t have time at the moment; you could research it. Also, a couple other things. I didn't see the Persian gods Ahura Mazda and Mithras mentioned. Christianity adopted aspects of the symbology or worship practices regarding these two gods, who both had large followings before and during the Roman Empire. Finally, he kept the article very G-rated, which was nice, but it doesn't mention the fertility symbolisms and metaphors that abound in "Christian" iconography, which, to me, is one of the most compelling arguments for them originating in paganism. Enjoy.

I would welcome other peoples' thoughts on this zaniness. :wink: What do you think? Leave your comments below.






_____________________________________________________________________





Image
Christmas is a mishmash of many different long-standing pagan practices and beliefs.
Besides Yule, another big influence on Christmas is the pagan celebration in honor
of the god Saturn, the Saturnalia.





The Pagan Christian Calendar.jpg





____________________________________________________________________







Christmas Traditions: Pagan or Christian?
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/panmankey/ ... christian/
by Jason Mankey
December 3, 2013


It’s December which means it’s time to sell books and push the ridiculous narrative that a “War on Christmas” is being waged. There’s currently no war on Christmas, and when there has been a war on the holiday it’s one that has generally pitted Christian against Christian. Christmas is a holiday with numerous traditions and a very long history. Some of that history can be traced to the paganisms of antiquity (perhaps even more so than Halloween), and some of it also arose from Christian tradition.

The modern Christmas holiday arose from a third source as well: secularism. There’s nothing religious about Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol and Clement Moore’s A Visit From St. Nicholas (The Night Before Christmas) and both were highly influential in establishing Christmas as the Western World’s most popular holiday over the last two hundred years. Dickens and Moore didn’t invent Christmas, but they popularized the holiday in a completely secular way.

It doesn’t matter where our holiday customs come from, but it’s fascinating (and fun) to trace their various origins. Some of them are only a few hundred years old or less, and some are literally thousands of years old. Decorating with holly doesn’t suddenly make one a Pagan, nor does using the word Christmas make one a Christian. Christmas is a confluence of religious traditions, capitalism, story telling, and the human need to simply connect with those we love. Christmas is more powerful because it reflects a wide range of influences.

What follows are twelve different holiday traditions (of course it had to be twelve, twelve days of Christmas and all that) and an outline of their various origins. At the end of each tradition I render a verdict on whether that tradition is Pagan, Christian, or Secular. It’s all in good fun, but the information is accurate. Happy Holidays!

Holly and Ivy: I’ll always associate holly and ivy together during the Holidays, no doubt due to the song The Holly and the Ivy. Holly remains a popular Christmas decoration with its distinctive green leaves and red berries, but sadly about the only time ivy turns up during the holidays is when someone is singing the song I just mentioned. Decorating with holly (and ivy) is an ancient pagan tradition (1) and was used by the Romans to decorate at Saturnalia celebrations. Like most plants (or trees) on this list early Christians were well aware of the pagan origins of decorating with holly. Pope Gregory the Great even encouraged the continuation of some pagan traditions. In a letter written in 601 CE (Common Era) he wrote:

“The idol temples of that race should by no means be destroyed, but only the idols in them. Take holy water and sprinkle it in these shrines, build altars and place relics in them . . . When this people see that their shrines are not destroyed they shall be able to banish error from their hearts and be more ready to come to the places they are familiar with, but now recognizing and worshipping the true God . . . . .Thus while some outward rejoicings are preserved, they will be able more easily to share in inward rejoicings. It is doubtless impossible to cut everything at once from their stubborn minds . . . .”

As we shall see, Gregory’s advice was taken on more than one occasion when dealing with Midwinter traditions. Verdict: Holly and Ivy are most certainly Pagan Traditions, but to be fair, if you are looking to decorate in December with greenery your choices are pretty limited.

Mistletoe: Mistletoe was a popular decoration at Roman winter festivals and is probably better known for killing Balder in Norse Mythology (darn Loki!) and as an alleged sacred plant of the Druids if Pliny the Elder is to be believed. (2) Ancient pagans most certainly decorated with it, but it didn’t become the kissing plant we are familiar with until centuries later. The “kissing bush” was first popularized in the late 18th Century and originally contained more than mistletoe. Holly, evergreens, fruit, and mistletoe were often bunched together and then hung over doorways to instigate kissing.

No one is exactly sure why mistletoe became a favorite doorway ornament, but by the middle of the 19th Century it was a popular custom. (3) Mistletoe, like holly, stays green and produces berries over the winter, making it a natural for Yuletide decoration. Verdict: A little bit of Christian and Pagan. Pagans certainly decorated with it, as did later Christians, but it was Christians who began the kissing custom.

Christmas Tree: The Christmas Tree has a possibly long and tangled history. Ancient Romans and Greeks decorated their homes with evergreen branches and there’s even a Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus with what appears to be an early version of the Christmas Tree. Pagans certainly used evergreens, but pictures of Dionysus aside, no one is completely sure if they used entire trees. Pagans in what is now Poland used to hang evergreen branches from their ceilings and decorate them as well.

There are two early Christian traditions which seem to foreshadow the Yuletide tree. The first is the Paradise Tree, usually an evergreen tree decorated with apples, and used as a prop for Christian mystery (or miracle) plays. December 24 was the old feast day of Adam and Eve so they were often around near Christmas. German families also used to build Christmas Pyramids or Lichstocks, which were wooden frames often decorated with evergreen branches, fruit, and gifts. (4) The first “Christmas Tree” dates back to the early 1520′s in Germany and spread from there, becoming popular in the United States and Britain during the Nineteenth Century. (5) Verdict: Probably mostly Christian, but with a touch of Pagan on the side. I’d love to argue that Dionysus set up the first Christmas Tree but it doesn’t seem all that likely.

Poinsettia: The poinsettia (pronounced by some, including me, as poin*set*a) was first introduced to the United States in 1825 by the then ambassador to Mexico Dr. Joel Roberts Poinsett (who was a bit of an amateur botanist). During the winter the leaves of the poinsettia plant turn bright red (and other colors) making it a natural for holiday decorating. The plant became associated with Christmas due to a few different Mexican folktales. One tale tells of a little girl who wanted to give a gift to the baby Jesus but could only find weeds to bring him, which miraculously changed into poinsettias. Another more logical tale (how does a Mexican child get to the baby Jesus?) tells of a young boy who brought weeds to a Christmas Eve mass as an offering, where they too turned into poinsettias. The Aztecs were well aware of the poinsettia, but apparently didn’t use them for any specific religious purpose. (6) Verdict: Christian.

Yule Log: The custom of the Yule Log is first documented in Britain in the early 1600′s, where it was first called a “Christmas Log.” Later it was dubbed the Yule Log or sometimes the Christmas block. More than just a giant piece of wood, the Yule Log was part of a large procession before entering a home, ending with a round or four of drinks for everyone who delivered it safe and sound. Many Christmas revelers attached supernatural power to the Yule Log; its burning was said to keep a home safe from harm for the next year. (7) The Norse most likely burned large logs to ward off evil spirits near Midwinter, it’s possible that this tradition led to the development of the Yule Log centuries later. (8) Verdict: Most likely Christian but with Pagan echoes.

Lights and Light: The lights we decorate our homes (and trees) with during the Holiday season have a long history. Ancient pagans lit bonfires and candles on the winter solstice and the holidays around it to celebrate the return of the light. (9) In Christianity holiday lights are represented by Jesus as “the light of the world” and the star above Bethlehem that guided the magi written about in the book of Matthew. Solar deities such as Sol Invictus were also celebrated at Midwinter adding to the solar imagery. Verdict: Most definitely Pagan, though Jesus as the “light of the world” is a nice play on the idea.

Gift Giving: For many folks (especially of the younger variety) the highlight of Christmas is the receiving of gifts. Christians often look to the magi (more famous as “The Three Wise Men”) as the originators of the custom, but pagans were doing it long before Jesus was born. The Romans exchanged gifts at during Saturnalia (a winter holiday lasting the week of December 17-23), including toys and edible treats. (10) For several centuries gifts were given not at Christmas or the Winter Solstice but on New Year’s Day. Queen Victoria didn’t start giving out Christmas presents until 1900, instead she followed the old custom of New Year’s gifts. (11) It’s taken several centuries to slot out the various customs we now associate with Christmas, New Year’s, and Halloween. Verdict: Pagan, but don’t underestimate the power of capitalism for the importance placed on gift-giving during the Holidays. Both Christians and Pagans tended to give little gifts during their Winter revels in the centuries leading up to the modern era.

Santa Claus: The modern Santa Claus arose from a multitude of sources, but the least celebrated and most important is probably the Norse Odin (the Anglo-Saxon Woden). Early pictures of the man we’ve come to know as Santa are closer to the iconography of Odin than that of a Saint from Asia Minor. In the Netherlands Sinter Klaus’s first steed was not a reindeer but a horse, just like Odin. There’s most certainly a trace of the Turkish St. Nicholas in our modern Santa Claus, most notably his generosity, but he contains just a bit more pagan in his DNA than Catholic saint. The Dutch words for Saint Nicholas are Sinter Klaus, which has been corrupted into Santa Claus, so he has that going for him if you’re keeping score at home. Santa Claus’s most famous appearance owes very little to Catholic or Norse myth, and is pure fairytale. Clement Moore’s A Vist From Saint Nicholas is a fanciful and secular take on the figure and has helped shape Santa myth for nearly two hundred years now. The modern appearance of Santa is a gift from Madison Avenue. Verdict: Pagan, but at his best Santa is a wonderful blending of pagan, Christian, and commercial.

To read more, click here: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/panmankey/ ... christian/




.


:fairy: bling ~ Have a magical day, now ~

Ask Kassandra
Find Balance
Awaken
User avatar
Kassandra
EUTM Support
EUTM Support
 
Posts: 3533
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy
Gender: Female

Re: Origins of christmas?

Postby Rainbowkiss » Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:24 pm

Thanks Kassandra, you have answered my question completely. I also already know about the power hungry fundementalists. Unfortunately, some jerusalem apostles determined that christianity was not founded by Jesus but St. Paul. Paul hijacked the religion and deliberately twisted the teachings of Christ and put lies in his mouth. The jerusalem apostles knew Jesus much better than Paul. In fact, paul created the false theology that only faith in Jesus can save us. The JAs continued the theology that good deeds can liberate us. Who's more trusting Paul or Jesus? Christianity is now being called paulinism or christianism because most christians follow Paul's teachings. Paul taught the following: Anti-marriage, slavery, racism, misogyny, homophobia, judgementalism, eternal damnation, authoritarianism, bigotry, ect. All these is certainly not what Jesus taught. Happy blessings!
Rainbowkiss
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 3:17 pm

Re: Origins of christmas?

Postby Kassandra » Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:35 pm

.


Indeed. Instead of getting mad at zealously proselytizing Christians, we should have some compassion. I think they're well-intentioned and really want to save the world, in their own way. But, boy have they been told some whopping doosies over the centuries ...over millenia I should say! That's gotta' hurt.

The reason why Jehovah's Witnesses, who consider themselves Christians, don't celebrate any Christian holidays today is because they openly acknowledge all of these holidays are of pagan origin. Just ask a JW next time you see one (after all, they realy like talking --hehe, might as well take advantage of that). They will cite reputable historical sources to back up all their claims. You'd be surprised at what they know.

I know the sources they're citing are solid because I made the mistake of researching this stuff for a college term paper many years ago, and finding out that way. Imagine my chagrin. I couldn't believe it; it's all been a pack of lies. I've never looked at Christianity the same way, since.

Yeah, Merry Christmas. I guess. :|




.
:fairy: bling ~ Have a magical day, now ~

Ask Kassandra
Find Balance
Awaken
User avatar
Kassandra
EUTM Support
EUTM Support
 
Posts: 3533
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:42 pm
Location: Terra, Sol III, Milky Way Galaxy
Gender: Female

Re:

Postby Rainbowkiss » Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:15 pm

:wink2: :P Yeah we should have more compassion for christians, after all we are wiccans ;) I used to have a christian best friend but she feared for my eternal destiny: kind of her but I no longer fear death. :)
Rainbowkiss
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 3:17 pm


Return to Ask Kassandra

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests