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Alura's Book of Shadows: Working with Entities

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 04, 2013 3:12 pm

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Idiots-G ... witchcraft

Working with Entities

You need to tell the entities you have asked to ritual what you want them to do.


Summon the entities that are close by and all around you
Stirring implies a higher level of respect and is used for larger, more powerful beings
Call to angels and to the lord and lady
Invite familiars
Request presences


The Elements: Air, Fire, Water, and Earth

Summon

Ask the Elements to stand outside your magick circle and guard it or for them to witness you ritual and any magick you do.


Dragons

Stir

Earth dragon: Possesses all the strength of the earth itself. If provoked to anger will cause earthquakes and geological plate shifts
Water dragon: Wields all the power of the ocean
Air Dragon: Commands forces equal to the jet stream and devastating tornado
Fire dragon: Lava and molten core of the earth
Spirit dragon: essence of the god and goddess, the spirituality of everything on earth.

Dragon energy can be unpredictable. You can’t have any doubt in your own ability to focus your energy or intent.

You should only Invite the dragons to attend your ritual under special circumstances. Treat them with respect.

watercolor_dragon_by_owldeerforest-d546fl6.jpg



The Guardians of the Watchtowers

Stir

Stir them when you are doing something that is important. You can have them observe, guard or protect you during ritual. You can ask them to deliver your magick in cases of life or death



Winds

Request

Great for taking your magick and delivering it quickly and forcefully.

South wind is associated with Fire... Ex. Good for sending out a love spell
North wind for its earthy aspects
West wind for its watery qualities
East wind for its air associations



Fairies

Summon

Not a good idea to invite them into your magickal circle as a novice. They might cause mischief with the energy you raised. They will guard your house and make sure nothing goes wrong.

Leave gifts of milk, honey, coins or shiny objects. Don’t thank them

Spring-Fairy-Sweetness.jpg



The Elementals

Summon

Don’t invite them into your magickal circle. They will guard, observe, or carry your magick to the place it needs to go.

Leave gifts of milk and honey. Don’t thank them

Sylphs: help give you inspiration, heighten intuition, and absorb information
Salamanders: Work with issues of sexuality or love and will help you build up passion, vitality, enthusiasm and spirituality.
Undines: dealing with healing, purification, creativity, or emotional issues
Gnomes: Issues involving growth, nurturing, abundance, fertility or prosperity.




Tree Spirits

Summon

Each spirit has its own personality, depending on the kind of tree.




Deities

Call

You need to be familiar with the deity’s aspect before you invite them to your ritual. They can protect, guide, or support you. They will help you carry out your magick. They will also heal, nurture you.




Angels

Call

Level 1:
Seraphim- angels of pure love and thought
Cherubim- Spirits of harmony and the wisdom of the All
Thrones- Spirits of will and justice

Level 2:
Dominions- angles of wisdom and intuition
Virtue- angels of choice and movement
Powers- angels of form and space

Level 3:
Principalities- angels of personality and time
Archangels- Michael, Gabriel, Uriel and Raphael; angle messengers; guardian angles

Level 3 are very intense and can be rather frightening
The guardian angels and the arch angles are more accessible

Ask angels to help enhance your magick or to carry it to the lord and lady.
Angels can also help your magick to manifest. Great to work with on spiritual issues and health matter. Heal you from physical and psychological pain. Will also protect you at any time.




Ancestors

Stir

Ancestors are figures from the past who held great wisdom and knowledge. You don’t have to be related to a person to consider him or her an ancestor. If your own relatives are particularly wise, you could stir them

You can stir the ancestors and ask them to attend your ritual, to aid your creativity and wisdom. They will give you good guidance and help you make decisions




Spirit Guides

Request

Help you to learn your spiritual lesson
Watch over you
Guide you on your path of life
When you do ritual, invite your spirit guides to come into the circle with you
Ask them to help you carry out your magic and to protect, guide, and support you



Spirit animals

Summon

Represents the spirit of a particular species of animal
Spirit animals carry messages or magic to their destinations

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images.jpg (9.61 KiB) Viewed 10593 times




Familiars

Invite

Familiars can enter and exit your magic circle at will
Familiars give you confidence, can warn you if you have made a mistake and can enhance your magic
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Alura Noel
 
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Alura's Book of Shadows: Candle C. Magical Assoc.+ Healing U

Postby Alura Noel » Thu Jun 06, 2013 12:04 pm

http://www.hecatescauldron.org/Goddess% ... Colors.htm
https://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article/2174


Candle Color's Magical Associations + Healing Uses


Magical Candle Use


Black: Banishment, break bad habits, Crone aspect of the Triple goddess, stop gossip, separation, uncovering truth, wisdom
Brown: grounding, diffusing potentially harmful situations, relieve excess energy
Dark Blue: Feminine deities, organization, water element
Gold: Financial increase, personal security, solar deities, the God
Gray: Vision, neutrality, absorbing negative energy
Green: Earth element, fertility, growth, healing, independence, obstacle removal, productivity, prosperity
Indigo: Insight, vision, change, flexibility, psychic abilities
Lavender: stress and tension relief, knowledge retention, inner beauty, mental ability
Magenta: Intuition, change, spiritual healing, vitality
Mauve: cooperation, intuitive power, psychic ability, self-confidence, self-trust
Orange: attraction, business projects, business proposals, indifference, personal motivation, productivity, study
Pale Blue: calmness, clarity, healing, peace, pleasant dreams, tranquility
Peace: empathy, friendship, kindness, sympathy
Pink: friendship, harmony, love, romance, self-love
Purple: Spirit element, job interviews, mental power, psychic power, protection, respect, spirituality, victory
Red: control, Fire element, lust, Mother aspect of the Triple goddess, passion, physical energy, physical strength, sexual desire, timidity relief
Silver: lunar deities, peace, serenity, the Goddess
Teal: agricultural efforts, balance, self-control, decision-making, practical matters, trust
Turquoise: diplomacy, eloquence, knowledge retention, logic, love, relaxation, stress relief, study
Violet: Success, intuition, self-improvement, spiritual awareness
White: clarity, focus, Maiden aspect of the Triple goddess, protection, substitution for any other color, spiritual guidance, tension relief
Yellow: Air Element, communication, creative endeavors, joy, success

Candle Magic and healing

Black: protects from curses and an aid during loss
Blue: insomnia, high blood pressure, minor wounds
Brown: Finding what’s lost, protection of animals, animal healing
Gold: Fast luck, financial benefits
Green: headaches, colds, nervousness
Indigo: dementia, depression, mental disorders, removing fear
Magenta: immediate action of spiritual healing and exorcism
Orange: coughs, colds, asthma, arthritis, exhaustion
Pink/Rose: treating anxiety, depression, aliments of the heart
Purple/Violet: allergies, sleep disorders, stress related disorders
Red: healing exhaustion, strength
Silver/Gray: develop psychic abilities
White: broken bones, relieving dental pain, increasing milk production
Yellow: healing skin conditions, stomach complaints, menstrual cramps


☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼


goddess-of-music-nikki-smith.jpg



I found this from someones post on here but can't remember who. But i found this to be interesting.

Goddesses Candle Color Associations

Aditi: Hindu Sku-Goddess. Her sacred candle color is blue.
Amaterasu-O-Mi-Kami: Japanese Sun Goddess. Her sacred candle colors are yellow and gold.
Anaitis: Persian fertility-goddess. Her sacred candle color is green.
Anu: Celtic Mother-Goddess, Dawn Mother, and Goddess of death and the dead. Her sacred candle colors are white and black.
Aodh: Celtic Fire-Goddess. Her sacred candle color is red.
Aphrodite: Greek Goddess of love and beauty and one of the twelve great Olympians. She is also knows as Cytherea, and is identified with the Roman Love-Goddess Venus. Her sacred candle colors are red and pink.
Arrianrhod: Welsh Mother Goddess and Neo-Pagan Goddess of fertility. Her sacred candle colors are green and white.
Artemis: Greek Goddess of the Moon, hunting, and wild beasts. As a lunar Goddess, she has been an influential archetype for Witches and worshipers of the contemporary Goddess cult. She is the equivalent of the Roman Moon-goddess Diana . Artemis is identified with Hecate and Selene in Greek mythology. Her sacred candle color is white.
Asherali: Phonician Goddess of love and fertility. Her sacred candle colors are green and white.
Astarte: Greek Goddess of innocence and purity and daughter of Themis. The Goddess of justice. It is said that after leaving earth, she was placed among the stars where she became the constellation Virgo the Virgin. Her sacred candle color is white.
Athena: Greek Goddess of wisdom and the arts and one of the twelve Olympians. She is identified with the Roman Goddess Minerva and Her sacred candle colors are purple and white.
Bast: Egyptian Fertility Goddess and daughter of Isis. Also known as the Lady of Light. She bestows health and symbolizes sexual passion. In ancient times, she was worshiped in the form of a cat. Later, she was envisaged as a woman with the head of a Cat. Bast is one of the most popular ancient Egyptian Goddesses in modern day Witchcraft and sex magick cults. Her sacred candle colors are red, green and white.
Benten: Japanese Buddhist love Goddess. She is also the Goddess of femininity, music, literature and the sea. Her sacred candle color is pink.
Brigit: Celtic and Neo-Pagan goddess of fire, wisdom, poetry and sacred wells and also a deity associated with prophecy, divination and healing. Her sacred candle colors are red and white.
Ce-Aehd: Celtic Goddess of Nature. Her sacred candle color is green.
Ceara: Ancient Pagan goddess of Nature and feminine equivalent to the God Cearas. Her sacred candle color is green.
Centeotle: Mexican fertility goddess. Her sacred candle color is green.
Ceres: Roman Goddess of Harvest and fertility of the Earth and mother of Proserpina. In Greek Mythology, she is Demeter the Goddess of Agriculture and mother of Persephone. Her sacred candle colors are green, orange, brown and yellow.
Cerridwen: Celtic and neo-pagan Goddess of mountains, fertility and inspiration. Her sacred candle color is green.
Chloris: Greek Goddess of flowers, and equivalent of the Roman Flower-Goddess Flora. Her sacred candle colors are white and all floral colors.
Cybele: Phrygian Goddess of nature and fertility.
Demeter : Greek Goddess of fertility, husbandry and harvest, mother of Persephone, and an important Deity in the mysteries of the Eleusis. She is identified with the Roman Goddess Ceres and her sacred candle colors are green and orange.
Dew: Greek fertility goddess. Her sacred candle color is green.
Diana: Roman and neo-pagan moon goddess, mother goddess and virgin huntress of the moon. She is identified with the Greek Lunar Goddess Artemis and is worshiped mainly by Witches of the Dianic tradition. Her sacred candle colors are silver and white.
Durga (also Durva): Hindu goddess and the God Shiva is her consort who was worshiped throughout India. But especially in Bengal. Durga is depicted as a ferocious ten-armed dragon-slayer, but it is said she is loving and gentle to those who worship her. Her sacred candle color is red.
Eostre: Saxon and neo-pagan Goddess of fertility and springtime whom the holiday of Easter is named after. Her sacred candle color is green.
Epona: Celtic mare goddess who sacred candle color is white.
Ereshkigal: Sumerian horned-goddess and Queen of the Underworld. She is identified with the Greek-lunar Goddess Hecate and is depicted as having the body of a fish with serpent-like scales and the ears of a sheep. Her sacred candle is black.
Esmeralda: South American Goddess of love. Her sacred candle color is emerald green.
Flora: Roman Goddess of flowers and all that flourishes. She is the equivalent of the Greek flower Goddess Chloris and her sacred candle colors are with and all floral colors.
Fortuna: Roman Goddess of happiness, good fortune and chance who possesses the power to bestow upon mortals either wealth or poverty. She is identified with the Greek Goddess Tyche, and her sacred candle colors are green, gold and silver.
Freya (also Freyja): Scandinavian Goddess of fertility, love and beauty who sacred symbols and familiars were cats. She was also Queen of the Underworld and the sister and consort of the God Frey. As a neo-pagan Goddess, she is worshiped mainly by Wiccans of the Saxon tradition. Her sacred candle colors are green, red and black.
Frigga: Scandinavian Mother Goddess and consort of the God Odin. She is also the patroness of marriage an fecundity and is represented in myth riding in a chariot drawn by sacred rams. Her sacred candle color is white.
Frija: Pagan-Germanic earth mother and consort of the God Tiwaz. The day of the week sacred to her is Friday. Her sacred candle color is brown.
Hathor: Egyptian Goddess of beauty and the heavens and patroness of fecundity, infants and music. She is often depicted as a woman with a Cows head, wearing the head-dress of two plumes and a solar disc decorated with stars symbolizing her role as a Sky Goddess. Her sacred candle color is blue
Hecate: Greek Moon Goddess, neo-pagan Goddess of fertility and Moon magick, Queen of the Underworld and protectress of all Witches. She is also known as both the Goddess of Darkness and Death. She is the Queen of Ghosts and Crossroads. She is Hecate the maiden, Hecate the Mother and Hecate the Crone but in later years, She became most familiarized as the Crone. She is also known as Trivia, Goddess of the Crossroads and Antea bestower of nocturnal vision. Hecate’s sacred candle colors are black and silver.
Hera: Greek Goddess of death and rebirth, earth Goddess, and consort of the God Zeus. Her sacred candle colors are black and dark brown.
Hestia: Greek Hearth Goddess. Her sacred candle color is red.
Inanna: Sumerian Goddess of both love and war, who is identified with the Babylonian Goddess Ishtar. Her sacred candle color is red.
Ishtar: Asyrian, Babylonian and neo-pagan Goddess of love, fertility and war who personifies the planet Venus. She was a mother goddess and the consort of Tammuz, the God of Grain an Bread who died each winter and was reborn the following spring. As a triple goddess, she represents birth, death and rebirth. In her aspect as mother, she is the giver of life. In her aspect as Warrior maiden, she is the bringer of death. In her aspect as Crone, she brings rebirth and resurrection. The crescent of the new moon rising is one of her sacred symbols and she is depicted as a woman with bird-like facial features and braided hair, wearing a bull’s horns and jeweled necklaces, bracelets and anklets. She is associated with the Sumerian goddess Inanna and the Phoenician Goddess Astarte. Her sacred candle colors are red and green.
Isis: Ancient Egyptian Mother Goddess of fertility and neo-pagan Goddess of magick and enchantment. She was the sister and consort of the sun-God Osiris and was at times identified with the Goddess Hathor. Isis is the symbol of divine motherhood and she was regarded in her mysteries as the single form of all Gods and Goddesses. She is often called the Goddess of Ten Thousand Names and in Hellespont (now Dardanelles) She was known as Mystis, the lady of the Mysteries. Her sacred candle color is green.
Kali: Hindu death Goddess, personifying the dark and terrifying forces of nature. She is depicted as a fanged, dark-skinned warrior-like woman wearing a necklace of human skulls around her neck. Her sacred candle color is black
Kuan Yin: Chinese Goddess of fertility, childbirth and compassion. She hears the cries of the world and just uttering her name, She appears. Her sacred colors are green and white.
Kupala: Slavic Goddess of life, sex and vitality. She is worshiped on midsummer’s day, and her sacred candle color is red.
Lucina: Roman Goddess of the Moon who is also associated with childbirth. Her sacred candle colors are silver and white.
Luna: Roman and neo-pagan Moon Goddess whose name is Latin for Moon. She is identified with Selene and Artemis and her sacred candle colors are white and silver.
Maat: Egyptian Goddess of truth, justice and the order of the universe. Her symbol was a feather. Her sacred candle color is white.
Morrigan: Celtic War Goddess of Death and destruction and the Mother of all Irish Gods. She is said to appear in the form of a Raven (a bird of ill-omen in the Celtic tradition) before and during battles. She is also known as the “spectre queen” and “Great Queen Morgan.” As a Goddess trinity, she was called Macha when she worked magick with the blood of the slain, Badb when she appeared in the form of a giantess on the eve of war t warn soldiers of their fates, and Neman when she appeared as a shape-shifting crone. Her sacred candle colors are scarlet and black.
Mut: Egyptian Goddess of fertility. Her sacred candle color is green.
Mylitta: Babylonian Goddess of fertility. Her sacred candle color is green.
Nemesis: Greek Goddess of anger and vengeance and mythological daughter of Erebus and Nyx. Her sacred candle color is red.
Ninhursag: Mesopotamian earth Goddess. Her sacred candle color is dark brown
Nut (also Nuit): Egyptian Sky Goddess and Mother of Osiris, Isis, Set and Mephthys. Her sacred candle color is royal blue.
Parvati: Hindu Goddess of mountains and consort of the god Shiva. She is known as the ruler of Elves and nature spirits. The daughter of the Himalayas and the personification of cosmic energy. Her sacred candle colors are white and brown.
Pele: Polynesian Volcano-Goddess who is currently believed to reside in Kilauea on the main island of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, where she is worshiped as the essence of earthly fire. To this day, various offerings such as flowers, sugarcane, white birds, money and brandy are made to her whenever volcanic eruptions threaten the Hawaiian islands. Her sacred candle colors are red and orange.
Persephone: Greek Goddess known as the Queen of the Underworld. She is equivalent of the Roman Goddess Proserpina. Her sacred candle color is black
Pomona: Roman Goddess of fruits and fertility. Her festival of Pomonalia was celebrated in ancient Rome on the first day of November to mark the End of the Harvest. Her sacred candle color is green.
Rhiannon: Celtic/Welsh Mother Goddess, originally called Rigatona (Great Queen) and identified with the Gaulish Mare Goddess Epona, as she is pictured riding astride a pale-white horse carrying a magickal bag of abundance. Her sacred candle color is white.
Sekhmet: War Goddess of Ancient Egypt. She is depicted as a woman with the head of a lion and is the Egyptian counterpart of the Hindu Goddess Shakti. Her sacred candle color is crimson.
Selene: Greek Moon Goddess. She is known as the “Full Moon” and Goddess of Enchantments. Her sacred candle colors are silver and white.
Tlazolteotl: Central American earth-Goddess associated with fertility and love. She is also known as the Mother of All Gods and her sacred candle colors are brown and green.
Venus: Roman and neo-pagan Goddess of love and beauty who personified sexuality, fertility, prosperity and good fortune. She is Roman counterpart of the Greek Love Goddess Aphrodite. Her sacred candle color is pink.
Vesta: Roman Hearth-Goddess whose temple was lit by a sacred fire tended by six virgin priestesses known as the vestal virgins. Her sacred candle color is red.
Xochiquetzal: Central-American goddess of flowers. Her sacred candle colors are white and all floral colors.
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Alura Noel
 
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Alura's Book of Shadows; Making Herbal Remedies

Postby Alura Noel » Mon Jun 10, 2013 7:26 am

http://www.amazon.com/Rosemary-Gladstar ... pd_sim_b_1


Making Herbal Remedies

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A simpler measure

The simpler’s measurement is a “part”: for example, 3 parts chamomile, 2 parts oats, 1 part lemon balm. The formula defines the relationship among the ingredients, not exact amounts. The “part” is whatever unit of measure you desire, you simply have to apply it consistently. For instance, if you decide in this case to define part as an ounce, you would use 3 ounces of chamomile, 2 ounces of oats, and 1 ounce of lemon balm. It’s best to use either all fresh herbs or all dried herbs, to maintain the ratio of active constituents.


Herbal Pills

You can formulate your own blends and make them taste food enough that children will eat the,. They are excellent for a sore throat; you can formulate them with herbs that fight infection, and sucking on them is by itself soothing to the throat. Making herbal pills are a good project to do with children. It’s messy, fun and very easy. Carob or cocoa powder is added to make these pill balls tasty as well as effective. Licorice could also be used for this purpose.

How to Make Herbal Pills

1. Place powdered herbs in a bowl and mix with enough water and honey (or maple syrup) to make a sticky paste.
2. If you like, or if the recipe calls for it, add a tiny drop of essential oil to the mixture and mix well. Don’t add too much; one or two drops is all. Peppermint essential oils are nice flavoring agents. Of you could choose essential oils for their medicinal benefits they will bring to the remedy.
3. Thicken the mixture with enough carob or unsweetened cocoa powder to form a thick, smooth paste. Knead until the dough is as smooth as bread dough.
4. Break off small bits of dough and roll them into small balls, the size of pills. You can roll the pills in carob or cocoa powder for a finished look.
5. Dry the pills in a dehydrator, or place them on a cookie sheet and dry them in the oven at a very low temperature (around 150F, or just with the oven light on.). If you’re having warm and dry weather, you can even sun-dry them.
6. Once dried, these pills will keep indefinitely. Store in a glass jar in a cool, dark location. Write labels!



Tinctures

Tinctures are liquid extracts made from herbs. They are usually extracted in alcohol, but they can also be extracted in vegetable glycerin or apple cider vinegar. Tinctures are easy and convenient to use.

Vegetable glycerin is also used to make non-alcohol tinctures – these tinctures are known as glycerites. They have a much longer shelf life than the apple cider vinegar - 3 to 5 years if stored in a cool, dark cupboard. Tinctures made of vegetable glycerin are wonderful for children. They have a sweet taste to them and can make even bad tasting herbs taste good! Glycerin does not have the extraction power that alcohol does, but it still does a fantastic job and results in a highly effective product.
If you are using fresh herbs, you will want to dry them slightly or put them in a pan and cook them slightly so some of the moisture comes out.
Use vodka, alcohol proof 80% or higher

How to Make an Herbal Tincture

1. Chop your herbs fine. Place the finely chopped herbs in a clean, dry glass jar.
2. Pour enough alcohol over the herbs to completely cover them by 2 to 3 inches, and then seal the jar with a tight-fitting lid. It’s not unusual for the herbs to float to the top. If this happens, let them settle for a day or two, and then check to see if you need to add more alcohol to reach that 2- to 3-inch margin. Sometimes I mark the level of the herbs on the outside of the jar before adding the alcohol, to serve as a guide for how much alcohol to add.
3. Place the jar in a warm, sunny spot, and let the herbs soak for up to 4 to 6 weeks, shaking daily.
4. Strain the herbs from the liquid. Pour the liquid into a clean glass jar with a tight-fitting lid. Store in a cool, dark spot. An alcohol-based tincture will keep for many years, whereas a glycerin tincture will keep for 2 to 3 years and a vinegar based one at least 1 year.





Herbal bath

Depending on the herbs you choose and the temperature of the water, you can create a relaxing bath or a stimulating one, a bath that is soothing, or decongesting, or uplifting.

1. Place the herbs in a large handkerchief, clean nylon stocking, or strainer and tie it directly to the faucet to the tub.
2. Turn on the water at the hottest temperature, and let the water flow through the herb bag until the tub is halfway full.
3. Adjust the water temperature to a suitable degree; Warm to hot is relaxing, cold is stimulating, and tepid is neutral. Finish filling the tub, then add any essential oils




Herbal Liniments

An herbal liniment is made exactly the same way as a tincture; however, a liniment, which uses rubbing alcohol or witch hazel as its solvent, is for external purposes. Liniments are mare either for disinfectant purposes or to soothe sore, inflamed muscles.





Medicinal Oils

You make Medicinal oils to make salves and ointments. You can also use it as a massage oil and bath oils. When you make your oils occasionally condensation will form inside the jar, toward the top. This can cause your herbal oil to grow mold. If this happens you can open the jar and wipe away the moisture. If this is a chronic problem, use a cover of thick layers of cheesecloth, rather than a tight fitting lid, to allow condensation to evaporate. You can also use dried herbs or to wilt the herbs before using them. Be certain the container is completely dry.
Olive oil is preferred for medicinal oils
Other oils for massage or bath oil.


How to make Medicinal Oils

Keep the oil between 90 and 110F

1. Chop the herbs and put them in the top part of a double boiler.
2. Cover the herbs with an inch or two of high quality cooking oil.
3. Slowly bring the oil to a very low simmer, with just a few bubbles rising—no rapid boiling or overheating. Simmer gently for 30 to 60 minutes, checking frequently that the oil is not overheating. When the oil looks and smells “herby”- it will be a deep green or golden and smell strongly of herbs- then it don’t. The lower the heat, and the longer the infusion, the better the oil
4. Strain out the herbs, using a large stainless-steel strainer, and lined with cheesecloth, if needed. Discard the spent herbs. Let the oil cool, and then bottle and label it. A quick little hint: Don‘t put the labels on until after you have poured the oil and wiped down the outside of the jars, to avoid staining your labels.
5. Cold method - Pack a large jar with the herb of choice. Cover with oil. Cap tightly and allow to steep for 2-3 weeks in a warm, sunny place. For a stronger brew, use the once infused oil with new plant material and repeat the process. Strain, press and store.





Salves, Balms and Ointments

Salves soothe or heal an area of the body that is excessively dry, irritated, burned, or wounded. In many cases, salves contain natural ingredients that can promote the healing process and reduce discomfort in the area being treated. They are commonly used to treat severely dry hands, chapped lips, and sunburned skin. The only difference between salves, balms and ointments is the consistency. Balms are harder than salves and ointments are softer than salves. Use externally as needed for minor skin irritations, insect bites, cuts, abrasions, sore muscles, chest congestion, sore throat.

How to Make a Medicinal Salves, Balms, and Ointments

1. Make a medicinal oil.
2. For each cup of finished herbal oil, add ¼ cup beeswax. Heat the oil (If you're adding Essential Oils to your product, add them to the warmed oil just before adding the wax to avoid losing much of their value through evaporation.) and beeswax together over very low heat, stirring occasionally, until the beeswax has melted. Then do a quick consistency test. Don’t skip this step; it’s simple, takes only a few minutes, and will ensure that your salve if the thickness you desire. Place 1 tbsp. Of the mixture on a plate, then let it sit in the freezer for a minute or two. Then check the firmness of the salve. For a harder salve, add more beeswax to the blend (makes a balm). For a soft salve, add more oil (makes an ointment).
3. Once the mixture is the consistency you want, remove the blend from the heat and pour immediately into small glass jars or tins.
4. Store the salve in a cool, dark place where it will keep for at least several months.

Note: Add to warm oil blend:
approx.1 oz. Beeswax for balms
3/4 oz for salves
1/2 oz for ointments
Adjust the amount to suit your application.





A list of great herbs for Salves and balms:

Chickweed - drawing for splinters or stings, infection - burns and scalds - itching - eczema

Plantain - great healer for sores and wounds - stings - burns - acne - hemorrhoids

Comfrey - rapid healer and cell prolificator - use only on clean wounds to avoid trapping infection or dirt. Use for minor fractures that would not be cast (i.e. broken toes or ribs or hairline fractures) - sore or damaged muscles - osteoarthritis - bruises - sprains

Lemon Balm - relieve painful swelling - gouty inflammation - sores - insect bites - insect repellent

St. John's Wort - antiseptic and styptic for cuts, scrapes, ulcers, sores - localized pain like sciatica, cramping, breast engorgement during lactation, sprains, burns, aching joints

Stinging Nettle - insect bites - wounds - arthritic joints - gout - sprains and other localized pain

Rosemary - headaches - painful joints and muscles - rheumatism - cramps - acne

Calendula or pot marigold * - heals wounds - acne - varicose veins - inflammation - dry skin - vaginal yest infection - eczema - sunburn - scalds and burns - sore nipples from breast feeding - diaper rash



Here's a list of some EOs: all should be diluted before use unless noted.

Rosemary** - See above - analgesic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent - aids memory -clears thinking - sore muscles - cold feet - gout

Lavender**, *** - analgesic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antifungal, antispasmodic, antiviral, decongestant, sedative - headaches - eczema - burns and scalds - muscle pain - insect bites and stings - chest congestion - sunburn - diaper rash - acne - cramps - insomnia - lice and removing nits. We use it neat as a treatment for migraine headaches by rubbing a small amount on the temples. This is a must have for your Herbal Medicine Chest.

Eucalyptus - expectorant, decongestant, insecticide, analgesic, antirheumatic, highly antiseptic - great for chest rub to relieve congestion in respiratory ailments - painful joints - burns - cold sores - arthritic pain - insect repellent - aids concentration

Tea Tree*** - highly antiseptic and antifungal, antibiotic, antiviral, bactericide, expectorant, insecticide - cuts and scrapes - wart removal - cold sores - nit removal - vaginal yeast infection - acne - itching - reduces scarring - athletes foot - dandruff - insect repellent. A must have for your Herbal Medicine Chest.

Fir Needle - analgesic, antiseptic, deodorant, expectorant - chest rub - arthritis and rheumatic aches - sore muscles - acne - chest congestion - pain reliever

Peppermint** -Cooling, analgesic, antispasmodic, anesthetic, decongestant, febrifuge, insecticide, stimulant - clears thinking - discourages fever - travel sickness - digestive, relaxes stomach muscles - pain relieving - discourages nausea - travel sickness - headache and migraine - toothache - muscle and joint pain - insect bites and other skin irritations including itching - repels vermin

Pink Grapefruit - antiseptic, disinfectant, stimulant, and antidepressant - can reduce cellulite - acne - migraine - PMS- deodorant

*(not to be confused with French marigold used in herbicides and pesticides)
**CAUTION: avoid high doses during pregnancy
***Can be used neat or straight.




Herbal Teas

Medicinal teas are not as potent or as active as tinctures and other concentrated herbal remedies, but they are the most effective medicines for chronic, long-term imbalances. Herbal teas can be drunk hot or iced. They can be made into ice cubes with fresh fruit and flowers and used to flavor things.
They’re delicious blended with fruit juice and frozen pops for children. Once brewed, it should be stored in the fridge. An herbal tea is good for 3 to 4 days. For a medicinal tea to be effective, it should be administered in small amounts several time daily. For chronic problems, serve the tea three or four times daily. For acute ailments, take several sips every 30 minutes until the symptoms subside.
1 to 3 tbsp per cup of water
4 to 8 tbsp. per quart of water

How to Make a Medicinal Infusion

Infusions are made from the more delicate parts of the plant, such as the leaves, flowers, buds, some berries and seeds, and other aromatic plant parts.

1. Put 4 to 6 tbsp. of dried herb (or 6 to 8 tbsp. of fresh herb) into a glass jar.
2. Pour boiling water over the herbs, filling the jar. Let steep for 30 to 45 minutes.
3. Strain and drink





How to Make a Medicinal Decoction

Decoctions are made from the more fibrous or woody plant parts, like the roots and back, twiggy parts, and some seeds and nuts.

1. Place 4 to 6 tbsp. of dried herb (6 to 8 tbsp. of fresh herb) in a small sauce pan. Add 1 quart of cold water.
2. With the heat on low, bring the moisture to a slow simmer, cover, and let simmer for 25 to 45 minutes. (The length of simmer time and the amount of herb you use will affect the strength of the tea.) For a stronger decoction, simmer the herbs for 20 to 30 minutes, then pour the mixture into a quart jar and set it aside to infuse overnight.
3. Strain and drink.


How to make Solar and Lunar Infusions

Using the light of the sun or moon to extract the healing properties of herbs in one method for making tea. They may not contain the same amount of chemical constituents but they contain different level of healing provided by the moon and sun.

To make a Solar Infusion: place the herbs (using the same proportions as suggested for infusions and decoctions) in a glass quart jar with a tight-fitting lid. Fill with cold water and cover tightly. Let sit in direct sunlight for several hours.

To make a Lunar Infusion: Place the herbs in an open container (unless there are a lot of night-flying bugs around), fill with water, and position directly in the path of the moonlight. Lunar tea is subtle and magical.




Compresses, Poultices and Compound Poultices

Compresses: use a soft piece of cloth, preferably cotton or linen soaked in herbal tea, infusion, decoction or diluted tincture applied externally to relieve pain.

ȭ Cold compresses: used to ease headaches or applied to minor bumps and bruises to reduce swelling. Soak the cloth pad in room temp or cooler herbal solution of your choice.
ȭ Hot compresses: Use to ease muscle pain or speed wound healing. To make these, soak cloth in a hot infusion or other herbal extract as mentioned.

Poultices is like a compress except you apply fresh herbs instead of an herbal extract. Dried herbs or powders can be used by adding a little hot water. The fresh herb needs to be broken down (macerated) by some means to release their valuable properties. Pulse them in the blender, crush them with a wooden mallet, boil them for 2-3 minutes or, my personal favorite, and chew them up! Place the macerated herb directly on the skin (you can apply a little oil first to prevent sticking if you wish) and cover with a strip of gauze, a cotton ball or cosmetic cotton pad, muslin or linen to hold it in place. Apply as necessary.

Compound Poultice or Plaster - These are very much like poultices except that the plant materials used are dried and possibly powdered herbs mixed with a carrier or medium like oatmeal, ground flaxseed, clay or flour to create a paste when mixed with hot water. Remember grandma's mustard plaster? The hot paste is spread on a piece of cloth and then applied to the affected area. This is covered with another piece of cloth and possibly bound in place by wrapping the area with long strips of cloth. Besides holding the plaster in place for obvious reasons, this also holds in the heat for a bit longer. It may also make this method a little less messy.





Syrups and Honey

Syrups and Honeys - are the epitome of “a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down" with their thick, sweet flavor, not only pleasing to taste but also coating and soothing. A syrup might be a good choice for delivering an herbal remedy because children are more willing to take it, or because the sweetness masks the strong flavor of herbs like horehound (Yikes!) or because we need the remedy to go down more slowly, coating the throat or the esophagus and sphincter with their soothing, healing goodness. Maybe a combination of the three! Or you can add them to a cup of tea to sweeten, flavor and add healing benefits in a mild tasting, warm, soothing medium.

There are a couple methods used to produce syrups.

Method #1 - In a saucepan, combine equal parts prepared herbal infusion or decoction and unrefined sugar or honey. Heat. Stir until dissolved. Store in dark glass bottles with cork stoppers. This is important because a little fermentation may take place and the expansion may cause the bottle to burst if capped tightly.

Method #2 - Herbal honey or syrup- A slower extraction method that involves packing a jar with fresh herbs. Cover the herbs with honey and let sit for 3 weeks. Strain out the marc and cap. Because there is no water involved in this method and honey is such a good preservative, mold and fermentation are not much of a problem. Honey brings its own healing properties to this type of syrup making it my favorite for sore throats and coughs.

Method #3 - For use with herbs that require cooking to activate their healing potential or to deactivate chemical compounds in their make-up that might make you sick. Elderberry is one of those plants. To make elderberry syrup, you'll need approx. 1 cup of fresh berries or 1/2 cup of dried berries. Boil these in 3 cups of water, then reduce heat and simmer, covered 20-30 minutes. Strain and return to pan. Simmer until reduced by half. Add 1 cup honey to warm juice. Stir well and pour into a glass jar. Cap and refrigerate for up to 6 weeks. Take 1-2 tsps. Every 1-2 hours while sick with a cold or flu and 1 tbsp. daily as a preventative measure.
Additional herbs and spices can be added too...like cloves, cinnamon and fresh ginger.


Cough Drops



Ingredients

o 1 cup of water infused with herbs. I used slippery elm, coltsfoot, cinnamon, elderberry and chamomile
o 1.5 cups of honey (I use raw, organic honey from here)
o A candy thermometer (not necessary but very helpful!)
o a medium size sauce pan
o Silicon candy molds (not needed but helpful)

Instructions

1. Boil 2 cups of water and infuse with desired herbs. I used about ¼ cup of each herb for a really potent cough drop, but as little as 1 tablespoon of each herb is effective. To infuse: Pour boiling water over herbs. I put herbs in a muslin bag to make straining easier. Let steep for 20 minutes and strain out herbs (or remove bag).
2. Pour 1 cup of the herb infused water and 1.5 cups of honey into a medium saucepan and turn on medium high heat. (save the extra liquid and mix with equal parts raw honey for a simple cough syrup)
3. Stir the honey/herb mixture over medium high heat until it reaches 300 degrees. If you don’t have a candy thermometer, this usually takes about 30 minutes and can be tested by dropping a drop of the mixture in to ice water to see if it immediately hardens. It should harden to the point that it breaks if dropped on the counter. You can also tell because the mixture will start to foam and separate. At this point, it is vital to remove it from the heat quickly so it does not burn.
4. Pour into candy molds, or pour into a large baking sheet that has been greased with coconut oil or that has a silicon baking mat on it.
5. Let cool until it can be touched and molded and immediately and quickly form into lozenges with your hands (you might need help to do this quickly enough).
6. Put finished cough drops/lozenges on a silicon mat or piece of parchment paper to cool.
7. When completely cool, I toss in a mixture of powdered slippery elm and stevia to keep from getting sticky in humidity.
8. Use as needed for coughing, congestion or sore throat.

Notes:
Any herbs can be used. I picked the combination above to help sooth coughing, congestion and sore throat while boosting the immune system.



Lotions, Creams and Hydrosols

If you’re looking for a way to apply herbal remedies without leaving the oily protective barrier on the skin that you desire with salves, ointments or balms, consider lotions, creams and hydrosols. These herbal preparations are also valuable in our cosmetic/personal care arsenal.

Lotions - Latin: lavare - to wash. Lotions are solutions that are water based and easy to smooth over the skin's surface. As I mentioned, they are mostly absorbed into the skin rather than forming a film of protection over the top like oil based skin treatments. This water can be an infusion, decoction or hydrosol of any herbs that apply to the need. Medicinal lotions usually contain an antiseptic to address broken skin or soothing ingredients to cool hot irritations and minor skin injuries. Chamomile tea makes an excellent baby wash that calms and relaxes.

Lotions can also be emulsions - mixtures of two liquids that do not blend well. The old oil and water problem. Sometimes, the two can be mixed well enough by shaking well before use. But an emulsifying agent can stabilize the mixture. Some natural emulsifying agents might be beeswax, lecithin, lanolin or glycerin. None of these interfere with the ability of the solution to penetrate the skin. Each type of emulsifier brings its own healing properties to your lotion.

Beeswax - a thickening agent that hardens lotions, creams and soaps. It is valued for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Beeswax makes the thickest lotions and creams. It does provide a bit of a protective layer on the skin but is also absorbed to soften the skin.

Lecithin - rather slippery emulsifier that brings this characteristic to lotions and creams. Lecithin can be chemically extracted from animal and plant sources. And mechanically extracted from some plants such as soybean. The phospholipids in lecithin allow it to draw moisture from the air. Remember that our skin is our largest organ and lecithin offers deeply penetrating properties that carry healing benefits directly to the cellular level.

Lanolin USP- extracted from sheep's wool - slightly thickens lotions and creams. It is famous as a remedy used by nursing moms for sore nipples. It is protective and moisturizing, antifungal and antibacterial. Similar to oils in the human skin.

Glycerin - An odorless, colorless, sweet, syrupy, moisturizing substance derived from oils and fats as a byproduct of the saponification process. It offers preservative and emollient properties, is warming to the skin and edible. Edible...hmmm...an edible lotion...use your imagination!

The last three emulsifiers should be used sparingly because they can make your lotion sticky. For each cup of liquids, 1/2 to 1 tsp of one of the above should be enough. Don't be afraid to experiment.


Lotions can be colored but unless I want the properties of the herbs in question, I usually don't bother.

Alkanet - pink to red
Tumeric or Calendula - yellow
Nettle, Comfrey or Plantain - green

Other things to add to the healing properties of your lotions or creams are honey and royal jelly. These add vitamins and minerals as well as nourishing enzymes. Aloe vera juice, witchhazel and floral water are also wonderful additives. You can begin to see how various preparations overlap in their usefulness for creating more herbal remedies. Tinctures, hydrosols, herbal infused oils, teas, infusions and decoctions can all be used in lotions or creams. Alcohol based tinctures add to the cooling effect. Simply take into account the base of the ingredient - water or oil - and include them in your recipe quantities.


Basic recipe for emulsified lotions

3/4 cup oil
1 cup water
1/2 oz. beeswax

Add water to blender. Should cover blades.
Warm oil and beeswax until melted together.
Allow to cool until it begins to look filmy.
Turn blender on low and slowly pour oil/wax mix into water.
Once it's all in the blender increase speed to blend into a silky smooth lotion. Now is the time to add any extras to your lotion. But, like whipping cream, do not over blend.
Pour into containers. If not adding a preservative, refrigerate.

Another Method to making lotions:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1692/

Avoid contaminating your lotions and creams by dipping into the container with your fingers. Instead, use squeeze bottles or pumps. Cosmetic paddles can be used in creams. Essential oils may be added for their preservative qualities. Lavender and tea tree work well. The contents of a vitamins E capsule also helps.

Creams - are basically just thicker than lotions. Use a little more emulsifier and a little less liquid. If you are preparing a cream and all the water is not blended with the oils, either pour off the extra or use a paper towel to absorb it. Because creams are thicker, they are best stored in shallow jars with wider lids than the lotion bottles and removed with a cosmetic paddle or single use, clean wooden craft stick. Recycle these in other projects.

Hydrosols - are the offspring of the steam distillation process used to make essential oils. As the steam rises, water and oils combine until they begin to cool when they separate again. But, there's a little something from the oils that remains in the water creating a delightful liquid that can be used alone or added to other herbal remedies or cosmetics. Used both internally and externally, the liquid is not as potent as the essential oil. Lacking the bitter and intense properties of essential oils and yet retaining unique, subtle qualities of those oils in combination with the water soluble properties, hydrosols are unique and highly prized lotions. Not to be confused with floral or herbal waters, true hydrosols must be made by steam distillation. Floral and herbal waters, which are made by adding essential oils to water, do not contain the unique mild blend that results from the marriage of oil and water properties found in hydrosols. Hydrosols are anti-inflammatory acids that are soothing to the skin and pleasing to the palate. Providing you haven't made them from toxic plant material, they are very safe to use. In the past, except for rosewater and orange blossom water, this wonderful byproduct was thrown away.

Here's how to make your own hydrosol.

You'll need:

a granite canner with a convex lid
a fire brick
ice in a large plastic sealable bag
water
16 oz. or a quart of fresh plant material, picked at its best harvest time
(My favorite is rose petals!) Turkish delight, milk pudding and rose cream!
a glass bowl

Place the fire brick in the center of the canner. The purpose of the brick is to elevate the glass bowl above the heat and the water. Keep in mind that whatever you use will be in the water so you'll need it to be clean and sterilized.
Place plant material all around the brick on the bottom of the canner.
Add about 3 quarts of water to the canner.
Place the glass bowl on the brick.
Put the lid on right side up.

At this stage, you can let the water and plant material stand together (macerate) for a few hours if desired.

Bring to a boil.
As soon as the water boils, invert the lid so that it dips down in to the pan.
Fill the "bowl" formed by the inverted lid with ice (inside a plastic bag for easy removal).
Gently simmer on lowest heat for 30 minutes or until the water is nearly gone. If you need to open the lid to check, just crack it open without completely removing the lid. That steam is valuable!
Turn off heat and allow to cool.

Here's what's happening. You've created a crude still! While the water and plant material were simmering and evaporating, the steam was condensing on the cold, inverted canner lid, collecting and running down the convex lid until it drips into the collection bowl inside the canner.

P still.jpg
P still.jpg (19.27 KiB) Viewed 10634 times




Pour the liquid in the bowl through a wet paper filter lined funnel into a glass jar. The hydrosol will flow through the filter but any oily residue left in the filter is essential oil! There won't be much but you can collect what's there with a dropper.

Cap the hydrosol jar and refrigerate. I like to put mine in spray bottles for ease of application. They make a refreshing spritz on hot summer days!


For Herbal wine, this is a great link for recipes and how to do it!

http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/newsle ... alwine.php



As a guideline, dosages are:

I found the dosage infomation in Rosemary Gladstar's books.

Adult Dosages

Chronic health problems:
3 to 4 cups herbal tea daily
1 to 2 tbsp. of herbal syrup twice daily, or as needed
½ to 1 tsp. of tincture two to 3 times daily, for a total of up to 3 tsp. daily
2 or 3 capsules or pills two or three times daily, for a total of up to 6 capsules a daily

Acute problems are sudden, like toothaches, migraines, bleeding, burns, and sudden onset of cold or flu. Follow these guidelines for treating acute health problems.

Tea: ¼ to ½ cup served throughout the day, up to 3 to 4 cups
Extracts/Tinctures: ¼ to ½ teaspoon every 30 to 60 minutes until symptoms subside
Capsules/Tablets: 1 capsule every hour until symptoms subside



Children Suggested dosages:

When adult dosage is 1 cup:
Younger than 2 years: ½ to 1 teaspoon
2 to 4 years: 2 teaspoons
4 to 7 years: 1 tbsp
7 to 12 years: 2 tbsp.

When adult dosage is 1 teaspoon:
Younger than 3 months: 2 drops
3 to 6 months: 3 drops
6 to 9 months: 4 drops
9 to 12 months: 5 drops
12 to 18 months: 7 drops
18 to 24 months: 8 drops
2 to 3 years: 10 drops
3 to 4 years: 12 drops
4 to 6 years: 15 drops
6 to 9 years: 24 drops
9 to 12 rears: 30 drops
User avatar
Alura Noel
 
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 4:33 am
Location: Florida
Gender: Female

Alura's Book of Shadows:Herbs Healing Prop. Glance + interac

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:33 am

The Herbal Drugstore: http://www.amazon.com/Herbal-Drugstore- ... 1579547052

Herbs Healing Properties at a Glance + Common Herb/Drug Interactions


catnip.jpg



Acne
External: Calendula tea, lavender essential oil, tea tree essential oil
Internal: Burdock, dandelion

Altitude Sickness
Internal: Ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, Siberian ginseng

Angina
Internal: Coleus, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, hawthorn, khella

Anxiety
Internal: Chamomile, kava-kava, oats, Siberian ginseng, valerian
External: Lavender essential oil

Arthritis
Internal: Evening primrose, yucca
External: Cayenne, yucca

Asthma
Internal: Ephedra, garlic, ginkgo, licorice, onion, turmeric

Bladder Infections
Internal: Bearberry, cranberry, goldenrod, goldenseal, Oregon graperoot

Blisters
External: Calendula, comfrey, lavender essential oil, St.-John’s-wort, tea tree essential oil

Body odor
Internal: fennel, parsley, rosemary, sage
External: Rosemary, sage

Breast Cysts
Internal: Black cohosh, butcher’s broom, evening primrose oil, saw palmetto, vitex
External: Wild yam

Breast Pain
Internal: Evening primrose oil, vitex

Breastfeeding problems
Internal: aniseed, fennel, fenugreek

Bronchitis
Internal; Horehound, licorice, marshmallow, mullein, wild cherry back

Bruises
External: Arnicia, calendula, chamomile, comfrey, St. John’s wort

Burns
External: Aloe, calendula, comfrey, gotu kola, plaintain

Bursitis and Tendonitis
Internal: Cayenne, devil’s claw, ginger, kava-kava, licorice
External: Cayenne, turmeric

Canker Sores
Internal: Chamomile, gingko, goldenseal, gotu kola, licorice

Cardiac Arrhythmia
Internal: Chamomile, hawthorn, kava-kava, reshi, valerian

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Internal: Boswellia, gingko, turmeric

Cataracts
Internal: Bilberry, rosemary, turmeric

Cervical Dysplasia
Internal: Astragalus, burdock, milk thistle, red clover, yellow dock

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Internal: Astragalus, licorice, reshi mushroom, shiitake mushroom, Siberian ginseng

Cold Sores
Internal: Echinacea, lemon balm, mullein, St. John’s wort
External: Clove, Echinacea, lemon balm, mullein, St. Johns wort

Colds and Flu
Internal: Astragalus, Echinacea, elderberry, ephedra, garlic

Constipation
Internal: Cascara sagrada, flaxseed, papaya, psyllium seed, senna

Cuts and Scrapes
External: Aloe, calendula, cayenne, comfrey

Dandruff
Internal and external: Evening primrose oil
External: Flaxseed oil, tea tree oil

Depression
Internal: Ginkgo, kava-kava oats, St. John’s wort, vervain
External: Lavender

Diabetes
Internal: Bilberry, bitter melon, fenugreek, gymenma

Diarrhea
Internal: Agrimony, blackberry or raspberry leaf, carob, goldenseal, Oregon graperoot, peppermint

Diverticulosis
Internal: Aloe vera, cat’s claw, peppermint, psyllium, wild yam
External: Peppermint

Ear Infections
Internal: Echinacea, Oregon graperoot, shiitake mushroom

Eczema
Internal: Burdock, dandelion, gotu kola
External: Burdock, Echinacea, gotu kola, oats

Endometriosis
Internal: Chamomile, cramp bark, dandelion root, motherwort, yarrow

Eyestrain
Internal: Bilberry, eyebright
External: Calendula, chamomile, eyebright, witch hazel

Fatigue
Internal: Astragalus, licorice, reishi, schisandra, Siberian ginseng

Fibroids
Internal: Burdock, milk thistle, red raspberry, vitex

Fibromyalgia
Internal: Devil’s claw, ginkgo, grapeseed, St. John’s wort, willow
External: Cayenne

Flatulence
Internal: Chamomile, fennel, ginger, peppermint

Fungal Skin Infections
Internal: Garlic
External: Arnica, garlic, geranium essential oil, grapefruit seed extract, lemongrass, tea tree essential oil

Gallstones
Internal: Artichoke, dandelion, milk thistle, peppermint essential oil

Genital warts
Internal: Garlic, licorice, St. John’s wort

Glaucoma
Internal: Bilberry, ginkgo

Gout
Internal: Boswellia, celery seed, devil’s claw, turmeric, yucca

Gum Disease
Internal: Echinacea, goldenseal
External: Aloe, bloodroot, calendula

Hangover
Internal: Cinchona, dandelion, ginkgo, willow

Hay fever
Internal: Ephedra, garlic, licorice, peppermint essential oil, stinging nettle

Headaches
Internal: Cayenne pepper, feverfew, ginger, peppermint

Heart Disease
Internal: Bilberry, garlic, ginkgo, hawthorn, motherwort, onion

Heartburn
Internal: Aloe, cabbage juice, calendula, licorice root

Hemorrhoids
Internal: Butcher’s broom, dandelion, ginkgo, horse chestnut, yellow dock
External: Horse chestnut

Herpes
Internal: Bupleurum, Echinacea, lemon balm, licorice, St. John’s wort
External: Bupleurum, lemon balm, licorice, St. John’s wort

High Blood Pressure
Internal: Dandelion, forskolin, garlic, hawthorn

High Cholesterol
Internal: Artichoke, garlic, guggul, psyllium

Hives
Internal: Chamomile, licorice, stinging nettle, yarrow
External: Aloe, chamomile, yarrow

Hypothyroidism
Internal: Bitters (look for products containing gentian and wormwood), bladderwack, myrhh
External: Myrhh

Indigestion
Internal: Chamomile, ginger, licorice, marshmallow, peppermint essential oil

Insect bites and stings
Internal: Aloe, calendula, Echinacea, plaintain, tea, witch hazel

Insomnia
Internal: California poppy, chamomile, kava-kava, passionflower, valerian

Intermittent Claudication
Internal: Garlic, ginger, ginkgo, hawthorn, onion

Intestinal Parasites
Internal: Epazote, garlic, ginger, Oregon graperoot, quassia bark

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Internal: Chamomile, peppermint essential oil, psyllium

Kidney Stones
Internal: Corn silk, khella, skullcap, valerian, wild yam

Libido problems
Internal: Damiana, ginseng, ginkgo, oats, saw palmetto, wild yam

Liver Disease
Internal: Bupleurum, dandelion root, licorice, milk thistle, schisandra

Lyme disease
Internal: bupleurum, Echinacea, garlic, licorice

Macular Degeneration
Internal: Bilberry, ginkgo

Memory Loss
Internal: Ginkgo, Siberian ginseng, Water hyssop

Menopause
Internal: Black cohosh, dang gui, St. John’s wort

Menstrual Problems
Internal: Black cohosh, cramp bark and black haw, feverfew, vitex, yarrow

Motion Sickness
Internal: fennel, ginger, peppermint

Multiple Sclerosis
Internal: Black currant, evening primrose, and flaxseed oils; ginkgo, purslane

Nausea
Internal: Catnip, chamomile, ginger, lemon balm, peppermint

Nerve Pain
Internal: Corydalis, Jamaican dogwood, St. John’s wort
External: Cayenne

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Internal: Bergamot essential oil, California poppy, kava-kava, St. John’s wort, valerian

Osteoporosis
Internal: Horsetail, red clover, stinging nettle

Overweight
Internal: Garcinia, psyllium, Siberian ginseng, yohimbe

Parkinson ’s disease
Internal: Evening primrose, ginkgo, grapeseed extract

Pinkeye and Sties
External: Eyebright, gold thread, goldenseal, Oregon graperoot, tea, yarrow

Pneumonia
Internal: Elecampane, garlic, goldenseal, horehound, mullein, Oregon graperoot

Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac
Internal: Aloe, grindelia, jewelweed, plaintain, witch hazel

Prostate Enlargement
Internal: Pumpkin seed, pygeum, saw palmetto, stinging nettle root

Raynaud’s phenomenon
Internal: Bilberry, cayenne pepper, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, hawthorn

Scabies
External: Close essential oil, neem essential oil, rosemary, tansy, tea tree essential oil

Shingles
Internal: Licorice
External: Cayenne, ginger, lemon balm, licorice, St. John’s wort

Sinus Infections
Internal: Astragalus, Echinacea, ephedra, shiitake mushroom

Smoking Addiction
Internal: Coltsfoot, elecampane, lobelia, mullein, schisandra

Sore Throat
Internal: Echinacea, eucalyptus, marshmallow, shiitake mushroom, slippery elm

Sports Injuries
Internal: Cayenne, ginger, kava-kava, turmeric
External: Arnica, cayenne, comfrey, turmeric

Stress
Internal: Ashwaganda, Asian ginseng, gotu kola, schisandra, Siberian ginseng

Stroke
Internal: Garlic, ginger, ginkgo, hawthorn, onion

Sunburn
External: Aloe, calendula, St. John’s wort, tea, witch hazel

Toothache
Internal: Chamomile
External: Clove essential oil, licorice, turmeric

Ulcers
Internal: Calendula, chamomile, licorice, marshmallow root, meadowsweet, slippery elm

Vaginal Infections
Internal: Echinacea, garlic, goldenseal, Oregon graperoot, tea tree

Varicose veins
Internal: Butcher’s broom, gotu kola, hawthorn, horse chestnut

Warts
External: birch bark, bloodroot, celandine, pinon blanco, white cedar


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Common Herb/Drug Interactions


Bromelain: Increases risk of bleeding when taken with blood thinners

Echinacea: May counteract immune-suppressive drugs

Ephedra: May worsen the side effects of other stimulants (including caffeine)

Garlic: May increase the effects of blood thinners

Ginkgo: May increase the effect of blood thinners

Ginseng: May worsen the side effect of stimulants

Hawthorns: May increase the action of some heart medicine and decrease their side effects

High tannin herbs such as black or green tea, white oak bark, bearberry, witch hazel, black walnut husk, and raspberry leaves: Reduce the absorption of most drugs

High-berberine herbs such as goldenseal, Oregon graperoot, and barberry: Counteract short-acting blood thinners

High-fiber herbs such as fennel seed, psyllium husk, marshmallow root, Icelandic moss, apple pectin, flaxseed, also gel, and slippery elm: May delay the absorption of most drugs taken at the same time

Licorice: May worsen the effects of drugs that cause potassium loss

Siberian ginseng: Increases the effects of antibiotics

St. John’s wort: May increase the effects of narcotics and some antidepressants

Valerian: Increases the effects of sedatives
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Alura Noel
 
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Alura's Book of Shadows: Herbs Medicinal Profiles

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:35 pm

The Herbal Drugstore: http://www.amazon.com/The-Herbal-Drugst ... 0451205103

Most Common Herbs Medicinal Profiles


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Aloe (Aloe Vera)

Also called: Cape aloe.
Source: Native to Africa; grown commercially in southern Texas and Mexico
Parts used: Leaf gel, juice
Forms available: Various concentrations of the gel, powdered dry juice. The gel is incorporated into ointments, creams, lotions, and the like. Some of aloe’s active compounds deteriorate in storage, so use the fresh gel for maximum potency.
Uses: Externally, aloe gel has long been valued for healing minor burns, wounds, and abrasions, and relieving associated pain and inflammation. Aloe juice may hold promise for treating diabetes and reducing levels of triglycerides and blood sugar.
Caution: Don’t use this herb if you have intestinal obstruction, abdominal pain of unknown origin, diarrhea, inflamed intestines (colitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome). Aloe juice may produce a laxative effect if taken in higher dose than recommended. Don’t use for more than ten days.


Arnica (Arnica Montana, Arnica SPP.)

Also called: Leopard’s bane, mountain tobacco
Source: Native to Europe; most species occur in the mountains of western North America.
Parts used: Whole plant, flower
Form available: Creams, ointments, gels, tinctures, homeopathic preparations.
Uses: Externally as am anti-inflammatory, pain reliever, and anti-septic for sprains, bruises, acne, injuries, and swelling caused by none fractures, insect bites, rheumatic pains, and chilblains. Seldom used internally because its primary active constituents are considered toxic.
Caution: Avoid during pregnancy. Use only on short-term basis for acute conditions. May cause allergic dermatitis in sensitive persons or with prolonged use. Do not apply to open wounds or broken skin, except under the advice of a health care practitioner. Taken internally, low doses can cause gastroenteritis; high doses may damage the heart and in rare cases can induce cardiac arrest.
Conscientious consumer information: May be at risk in the wild; needs further study.


Astragalus (Astragalus Membranaceus)

Also called: Huang qi
Source: Native to northeast China, where it is also grown commercially.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, extracts, tinctures, and in many traditional Chinese formulas.
Uses: Colds, flu, minor infections. Many studies confirm immune-boosting, antiviral, antibacterial, and tonic properties. Shows promise in restoring T-cell function in cancer patients and preventing growth of cancerous cells
Caution: None known


Bearberry (Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi)

Also called: Uva-ursi, kinnikinnik, mountain box.
Source: Cool temperate regions from northern Europe to northern Asia, Japan, and North America.
Parts used: Leaf
Form available: Teas, capsules, tinctures. Some products are standardized to 2 percent arbutin.
Uses: Mild urinary tract infections.
Caution: Do not use while you’re pregnant or if you have a kidney disorder or irritated digestive condition. Bearberry may interact with herbs or drugs that acidify the urine. Discontinue its use after one week, except under the supervision of a health care practitioner. Overuse may promote liver damage. Not recommended for children.


Bilberry (Vaccinium Myrtillis)

Also called: Whortleberry, huckleberry
Source: Woods and forest meadows of Europe; commonly wild-harvested
Part used: Fruit (berries)
Form available: Capsules, tablets. Some products are standardized to 25 percent anthocyanosides.
Uses: Narrowing of the arteries, diarrhea, bruises, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, mouth and throat inflammations, eye conditions such as night blindness, cataracts, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
Caution: May interact with anticoagulant drugs.


Black Cohosh (Cimicifuga Racemosa)

Also called: Black snakeroot, sheng ma, bigbane, rattleweed.
Source: open woodlands from southern Ontario south to Georgia, west to Arkansas, and north to Wisconsin. Most of the root is wild-harvested; some if grown commercially in Europe.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, tinctures.
Uses: Premenstrual syndrome, menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, and menstrual cramps.
Caution: Avoid during pregnancy or when nursing. May cause stomach upset.
Conscientious consumer information: Threatened in the wild; purchase from reputable sources.


Burdock (Arctium Lappa, A. Minus)

Also called: Lappa, beggar’s buttons.
Source: Throughout Europe, western Asia, and the United States.
Parts used: Root, leaf
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, liquid extractions, tinctures.
Uses: Water retention, detoxification
Caution: No hazards are known. It’s thought that one case of human poisoning attributed to burdock was caused by contamination with or mistaken use of belladonna root.


Calendula (Calendula Officinalis)

Also called: Pot marigold
Source: Native to south-central Europe and northern Africa.
Part used: Flower
Forms available: Tea (for gargle, mouthwash, or internal use), ointments, creams, sprays, tinctures, extracts
Uses: Mild burns, sunburn, mouth infections, sore throat, wounds. Extracts may be beneficial in treating duodenal ulcers.
Caution: Persons allergic to the pollen of the other members of the aster family, such as ragweed, may be allergic to calendula.


Cascara Sagrada (Rhamnus Purshiana)

Source: From a small tree native to the Pacific Northwest.
Part used: Bark
Forms available: Tea, capsules, liquid extracts. Some products are standardized to 20 to 30 percent anthraquinones.
Uses: Constipation
Caution: May interact with heart drugs, corticosteroids, and licorice root; consult your doctor. Don’t use cascara sagrada if you have intestinal obstruction, abdominal pain of unknown origin, diarrhea, inflamed intestines (colitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome). Limit use to 10 days or less; consult a health care provider before using it if you are pregnant or nursing.
Conscientious consumer information to make the active principles milder, the bark must be aged one year or heat treated. Fresh dried bark produces a laxative that’s too strong for safe use. It also induces vomiting.


Cat’s Claw (Uncaria Tomentosa, U. Guianensis)

Also called: Una de gato
Source: South American rain forests; commercial supplies are wild-harvested in Peru and Brazil.
Parts used: Root, stem
Forms available: Capsules, extracts, tablets, tinctures. Products standardized for total alkaloid content are available.
Uses: South American fold medicine uses cat’s claw for intestinal disorders, dysentery, arthritis, wounds, and cancer. Modern research indicates significant immune-stimulating activity and antiviral, cancer-fighting, and antioxidant effects. German and Australian physicians have used cat’s claw to stimulate the immune systems of cancer patients. Extracts have been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, allergies, herpes, gastric ulcers, and side effects of chemotherapy.


Cayenne (Capsicum Annuum, C. Frutescens)

Also called: Capsicum, hot pepper, chili pepper
Source: Native to the tropical Americas and naturalized worldwide
Part used: Fruit
Forms available: Spice, tea, capsules, tablets, tinctures. Cayenne’s fiery compound, capsaicin, is used in topical creams.
Uses: Internally for antioxidant action, nutrition; topically for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, shingle, diabetic neuropathy, at the site of healed infections.
Caution: May interact with anticoagulant drugs; consult your doctor. Excessive internal use may irritate the intestinal tract. Manufactured, topical capsaicin creams can cause a burning sensation. Try a patch test on a small area of skin first. Wash your hands with soap after applying the cream to avoid spreading it to the eyes, nose, or other sensitive tissues.


Chamomile (Matricaria Recutita)

Also called: German chamomile, Hungarian chamomile, true chamomile.
Source: Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Germany, Argentina, Egypt.
Part used; Flower
Forms available: Tea, salves, tinctures, essential oils; ingredient in bath and body-care products. Some products are standardized to 1.2 percent apigenin/0.5 percent essential oil.
Uses: Indigestion, nausea, insomnia, inflammations, wound healing.
Caution: Persons allergic to the pollen of other members of the aster family, such as ragweed, may be allergic to chamomile. Chamomile is associated with rare contact dermatitis, It also may interact with anti-coagulant drugs.


Cranberry (Vaccinium Macrocarpon)

Also called: Trailing swamp berry
Source: Bogs from Newfoundland west to Manitoba, South to Virginia, and into the Midwest. Commercial berries are produced in Massachusetts and Wisconsin.
Part used: Fruit (berries)
Forms available: Whole fruit, raw or jellied, juice, fruit concentrate, capsules.
Uses: Prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections, nutrition.
Caution: No known risks associated with use.


Dandelion (Taraxacum Officinale)

Also called: Lion’s tooth, cankerwort, wild endive
Source: Found nearly everywhere on the planet; grown commercially in the United States and Europe
Parts used: Root, leaf
Forms Available: Cooking, teas, capsules, liquid extracts, tablets, tinctures
Uses: Leaves are used for enhancing bile secretion and decreasing water retention and bloating accompanied by flatulence and appetite loss. Roots are used for indigestion, as a diuretic, to promote bile secretion, and to treat rheumatism.
Caution: For use in treating gallstones, German health authorities recommend supervision by a qualified health care practitioner. If you have obstructed bile ducts, don’t use at all. The milky substance in fresh dandelion leaves may cause contact dermatitis. The bitterness in the root may cause hyperacidity. Avoid ingesting dandelion from areas where pesticides have been applied.


Dang Gui (Angelica Sinensis)

Also called: Chinese angelica, dong quai, tang kuei
Source: Cool mountain woods of southern and western China
Part used: Root
Forms available: Tease, capsules, tablets, tinctures, combination products; common ingredient in Chinese formulations
Uses: Menstrual cramps, menopausal symptoms, premenstrual syndrome, tonic for liver and female glandular system. In china, the herb is valued as highly as ginseng.
Caution: Avoid during pregnancy or nursing unless monitored by a qualified health care practitioner. May interact with anticoagulant drugs. In traditional Chinese medicine, dang gui is not administered to persons with diarrhea because of its mildly laxative action.


Echinacea (Echinacea Angustifolia, E. Pallida, E. Purpurea)

Also called: Purple coneflower
Source: E. angustifolia and E. pallida are native to the prairies of the Midwestern United States. Over-harvesting in the wild has led to commercial cultivation of both species. E. purpurea, the most commonly used species, is also native to the Midwest, but the world supply of this species is cultivated.
Parts used: Root, above-ground parts
Forms available: Capsules, juice of fresh flowering plant, tablets, tinctures.
Uses: Stimulating the body’s defenses against minor viral and bacterial infections such as colds and flu.
Caution: Persons allergic to the pollen of other members of the aster family, such as ragweed, may also be allergic to Echinacea. Don’t use the herb if you have autoimmune diseases such as tuberculosis, multiple sclerosis, or HIV infection.


Elderberry (Sambucus Canadensis, S. Nigra)

Also called: American elder, common elderberry, elder flower (S. Canadensis), European elder, elder flower (S. nigra)
Source: American elder grows from British Columbia east to Nova Scotia, south to the mountains of the North Carolina and west to Arizona. European elder grows throughout much of the Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, and wisely cultivated for its fruit.
Parts used: Ripe fruit (berries), flower
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tablets, tinctures, combination products
Uses: Preventing and treating colds and flu (berries); treating colds, fevers, and bronchitis (flowers).
Caution: The dried or cooked fruits and flowers are safe to use. Eating the fresh flowers or raw and unripe fruit can cause adverse reactions.


Elecampane (Inula Helenium)

Also called: Scabwort, alant, horseheal, yellow starwort
Source: Native to Europe and temperate Asia; Cultivated in Europe and China; naturalized in the eastern United States.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Teas, tinctures and dried root
Uses: Erases respiration and promotes expectoration in chronic bronchial coughs, asthma, emphysema, and tuberculosis. Modern research supports its use for pulmonary diseases. Elecampane has also been shown to contain powerful antibacterial properties.
Caution: Large doses cause vomiting, diarrhea, spasms, and symptoms of paralysis. Avoid during pregnancy. Use only under the supervision of a qualified health care practitioner.


Ephedra (Ephedra Sinica, E. Intermedia, E. Equisetina)

Also called: Ma-huang, Chinese jointfir (E. sinica), Chinese ephedra (E. sinica)
Source: Native to the steppes of north and northwestern China.
Part used: Stem
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, teas, tinctures. Some products are standardized to 6 to 8 percent ephedrine/pseudoephedrine.
Uses: Mild seasonal or chronic asthma, nasal congestion, sinusitis.
Caution: Don’t use ephedra- or products that contain it- if you have high blood pressure, heart disease, thyroid disease, diabetes, anorexia, bulimia, or glaucoma. The herb may interact with MAO inhibitors, cardiac glycoside drugs, and pharmaceuticals, so consult your doctor if you have questions. Avoid during pregnancy or while nursing unless under medical supervision. Numerous side effects of ephedra include insomnia, nervousness, tremors, and loss of appetite. Discontinue use if your symptoms worsen or do not abate in an hour. Keep out of your children’s reach.


Evening Primrose (Oenothera Biennis)

Source: Native to eastern North America and widely naturalized in Europe and western North America; most seeds for oil production are grown commercially.
Part used: Seed oil
Forms available: Capsules, expressed oil, in skin preparations and cosmetics.
Uses: Atopic eczema, fatty acid deficiencies (especially gamma -linolenic acid or GLA), premenstrual syndrome.
Caution: In clinical studies, fewer than 2 percent of people taking the herb for long periods noted side effects such as nausea, abdominal discomfort, and headache.

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Fennel (Fowniculum Vulgare)

Source: Native to the Mediterranean and widely naturalized throughout the world; common to California.
Part used: Fruit (“seeds”)
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures, lozenges
Uses: Bloating, flatulence, mild digestive spasms, catarrh, soughs; has antimicrobial, antispasmodic, and anti-inflammatory properties.
Caution: rare allergic skin and respiratory tract reactions have been reported. Fennel is potential source of synthetic estrogen, and should be avoided during pregnancy.


Fenugreek (Trigonella Foenum-Graecum)

Source: Ancient herb native to southern Europe and southwest Asia; cultivated in warm regions throughout the world.
Part used: Seed
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, seeds for cooking, powdered seeds for poultices.
Uses: Approved in Germany as an internal treatment for gastritis and loss of appetite, and as a poultice for inflammations. Used traditionally to stimulate flow of breast milk. Shows promise in lowering cholesterol and blood sugar.
Caution: May interfere with certain drugs for diabetes. Therapeutic dosages of fenugreek should be avoided during pregnancy, but use in cooking is okay. In clinical trials, some patients have reported intestinal gas and diarrhea. High in mucilage, the seeds may coat the stomach and block absorption of other drugs.


Feverfew (Tanacetum Parthenium)

Source: Naturalized in Europe and North and South America
Part used: Leaf
Forms available: Fresh or dried leaves, capsules, tablets, tinctures. Parthenolide and other related constituents may be responsible for the herb’s action; some products are standardized to 2.6 percent parthenolides.
Uses: Migraine prevention and treatment, fever, arthritis.
Caution: May interact with anticoagulant drugs. Avoid during pregnancy. Some people who chewed the fresh leaves reported experiencing mouth ulcers, tongue inflammation, lip swelling, and occasional loss of taste.


Flaxseed (Linum Usitatissimum)

Source: Amonhg the world’s oldest cultivated plants; commercial supplies imported from Nmorth Africa, Argentina, Turkey, and Canada
Part used: Seed
Forms available: whole seed; expressed oil of seed in bottles or capsules
Uses: Constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, source of omega-3 fatty acids. May benefit women with ovarian dysfunction and reduce risk of breast and colon cancer.
Caution: Do not take flaxseed if you have a painful bowel condition or if you suspect you may have a bowel obstruction. May interact with anticoagulant drugs, Mucilage from the seeds may affect absorption of other drugs.


Garlic (Allium Sativum)

Source: The bulb is unknown in the wild, having evolved over 5,000 years under cultivation.
Part used: Bulb
Forms available: Fresh or dried cloves, capsules, tablets, tinctures, aged extracts
Uses: Stimulating the immune system and fighting cancer. Well-documented health benefits include lowering cholesterol and triglycerides (a type of blood fat), fighting infections, and reducing blood pressure.
Caution: May interact with anticoagulant drugs. Rare cases of allergic reactions are known. Some people experience heartburn or flatulence.


Gentian (Gentiana Lutea)

Source: Native to the mountains of central and southern Europe; it is both cultivated and wild-harvested.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures, liquid extracts, combination products.
Uses: Dyspepsia, appetite loss, flatulence, bloating, digestive tonic.
Caution: Do not use gentian if you have stomach or duodenal ulcers. Some people experience headaches from using gentian.
Conscientious consumer information: May be at risk in the wild but needs further study.


Ginger (Zingiber Officinale)

Also called: Gingerroot
Source: Native to Eastern Hemisphere; cultivated for millennia in China and India; reached the West at least 2000 years ago
Part used: Root
Forms available: Fresh root, teas, capsules, tablets, tinctures, liquid extracts, candied slices.
Uses: Indigestion, nausea, motion sickness,; may help reduce cholesterol and narrowing of the arteries.
Caution: May interact with anticoagulant drugs. Do not take therapeutic quantities if you have gallbladder disease. The amounts used in cooking are safe. Despite its blood-thinning qualities, finger is unlikely to be harmful before or after surgery. Pregnant women who wish to use ginger for morning sickness should first consult their health care practitioner.


Ginkgo (Ginkgo Biloba)

Also called: Maidenhair tree
Source: Commercial production takes place mainly in South Carolina, France, and China.
Part used: Leaf
Forms available: teas, capsules, liquid extracts. Some products are standardized to 24 percent flavone glycosides.
Uses: All forms of cerebral insufficiency, including short-term memory loss, dizziness, Alzheimer’s disease, tinnitus, impotence.
Caution: May interact with MAO inhibitors and anticoagulant drugs. Rare cases of gastrointestinal upset and headaches have been reported.


Ginseng (Panax Ginseng, P. Quinquefolius)

Also called: Asian ginseng, Korean ginseng, Chinese ginseng, oriental ginseng, ginseng root (P. ginseng); American ginseng (P. quinquefolius).
Source: Asian ginseng is cultivated in China, Korea, and japan; American ginseng grows in eastern North America and is wild-harvested.
Part used: Root
Forms Available: For Asian ginseng, teas, capsules, extracts, tablets, tinctures; some products standardized to 5 to 15 percent ginsenosides. For American ginseng, capsules, tinctures.
Uses: Fatigue, mental dullness, convalescence, athletic performances, aphrodisiac, tonic.
Caution: Do not take this herb if you gave high blood pressure, heart palpitations, insomnia, and asthma, or high fever. May interact with caffeine, other stimulants, and anticoagulant drugs. With high doses or long-term use, some people experience over-stimulation or stomach upset.


Goldenseal (Hydrastis Canadensis)

Also called: Yellow puccoon, orangeroot
Source: Woods from Vermont to Georgia, west to Alabama and Arkansas, and north to eastern Iowa and Minnesota.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Capsules, tinctures, salves, ointments, liquid extracts. Some products are standardized to 5 percent hydrastine.
Uses: Antiseptic, cold remedy (for inflamed mucous membranes), stomach infections
Caution: May interact with anticoagulant drugs. Safety for pregnant women and children has not been established. The fresh plant may cause skin irritation.


Gotu Kola (Centella Asiatica)

Also called: Indian pennywort, tigergrass
Source: Native to tropical Asia where it is commercially cultivated; also grows in Hawaii and other Tropical areas.
Parts used: Whole plant, leaf
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures, tablets; ingredient in body-care products. Some products are standardized to 10 percent asiaticosides.
Uses: Internally for improving memory, reducing stress; externally to relieve inflammation and help heal wounds. Considered a rejuvenating herb in ancient Ayurvedic tradition.
Caution: No known risks associated with use.


Hawthorn (Crataegus Spp.)

Also called: English hawthorn (C. laevigata); oneseed hawthorn (C. monogyna)
Source: Found in North America, Europe, East Asia
Parts used: Fruit, leaf, flower
Forms available: teas, capsules, tinctures, extracts. European products are standardized to oligometric procyanidins and flavonoids.
Uses: Angina, coronary insufficiency, early stages of congestive heart failure. Preliminary experiments in China show that preparations of hawthorn berries may help to prevent and treat hardening of the arteries.
Caution: May interact with digitalis.


Horehound (Marrubium Vulgare)

Also called: White horehound
Source: Throughout much of Europe; naturalized in North America
Part used: Whole herb
Forms available: Teas, cough drops, candies
Uses: Coughs, catarrh, appetite loss, dyspepsia
Cautions: No known risks associated with use


Horse Chestnut (Aesculus Hippocastanum)

Also called: Buckeye
Source: Native to central Asia; naturalized in Western Europe and the United States. Much of today’s medicinal supply is produced in Poland
Part used: Bark, seed, leaf
Form’s available: The crude herb may be toxic; therefore, only standardized preparations (typically to 20 percent aescin) are recommended.
Uses: Weak veins, varicose veins, edema, bruises, sprains. Injectable forms are used in Germany to treat severe head injuries and to reduce postsurgical swelling.
Caution: Rarely, people using horse chestnut have reported stomach upset, nausea, and itching.


Horsetail (Equisetum Spp.)

Also called: Scouring rush, Dutch rush, rough horsetail (E. byemale); field horsetail, bottlebrush, shavegrass (E. arvense)
Source: Common in North America, but most of the supply comes from Europe and China
Part used: Whole herb
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures
Uses: Internally for water retention; externally for wound healing.
Caution: Do not use horsetail if you have heart or kidney disease, or if you are pregnant or nursing. Not recommended for children. Proper identification is crucial because some Equisetums, such as E. palustre, are poisonous. Do not take this herb long-term; data on toxicity are lacking.


Kava-Kava (Piper Methysticum)

Also called: Kava, kava pepper
Source: Exact origin is unknown. Today the herb is found throughout the South Pacific islands, from Hawaii to New Guinea.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, tinctures, combination formulas. Some products are standardized to 30 to 40 percent kavalactones.
Uses: Anxiety, stress, insomnia
Caution: Do not use during pregnancy or nursing. Do not use if you’ve been diagnosed with depression. May increase the effects of alcohol and other substances that act on the central nervous system. Exercise caution when driving or operating machinery. Do not exceed the recommended dose, and limit use to one to three months. Excessive or long-term consumption can cause a scaly yellowing of the skin, which goes away when treatment is discontinued.


Licorice (Glycyrrhiza Glabra)

Also called: Gan cao
Source: Native to and commercially cultivated in Europe and Asia. It also grows in North and South America and Australia.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures, extracts, tablets, candy. Used in many traditional Chinese formulations; some products are standardized to 12 percent glycyrrhizin.
Uses: Stomach or duodenal ulcers, premenstrual syndrome, congestion of the upper respiratory tract, coughs, low adrenal function.
Caution: Do not use licorice if you have high blood pressure, heart disease or liver disease, or diabetes. May interact with diuretics or digitalis. Do not use during pregnancy. Do not exceed recommend dose; discontinue use after six weeks.


Linden (Tilla Spp.)

Also called: Large-leaved linden, lime tree flowers, linden flowers
Source: Throughout northern temperate regions.
Part used: Flower
Forms available: Teas, tinctures
Uses: Nervous tension, headaches, feverish colds, and flu. Used since the late Middle Ages to promote perspiration and for nervous conditions, diarrhea, and indigestion. Scientific studies confirm the herbs ability to promote perspiration.
Caution: Overuse of linden-flower tea may cause heart damage. If you have heart problems, consult your doctor before using.


Marshmallow (Althaea Officinalis)

Source: England, Europe from Denmark and central Russia south to the Mediterranean, and the United States in salt marshes from Massachusetts to Virginia and in the western mountains.
Part used: Root, leaf
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tablets, tinctures
Uses: Sore throats and dry coughs, upset stomach, lung congestion; soothes and softens irritated mucous membranes. Traditionally, the root has been used in poultices, inflammation, insect bites, minor injuries and burns.
Caution: The herb’s main active ingredient, mucilagin, may delay the absorption of other drugs in the digestive tract.


Motherwort (Leonurus Cardiaca)

Also called: Common motherwort
Source: Grows throughout much of Europe and has become naturalized in the United States. For the U.S. market, motherwort flower if imported from Europe.
Parts used: Flower, whole herb, seed
Forms available: Teas, tinctures. Chinese formulations contain both herb and seeds.
Uses: Heart disease, high blood pressure, muscle cramps, irregular menstruation, excessive menstrual bleeding, and kidney disease; also recommended for improving circulation.
Caution: May interact with blood-thinning medications. Avoid use if you’re pregnant or nursing.


Mullein (Verbascum Thapsus)

Also called: Great mullein, Aaron’s rod, velvet dock, lungwort
Source: Widely grown in Europe and Asia and naturalized throughout North America. Commercially harvested in Europe and United States.
Parts used: Leaf, flower
Forms available: Teas, flowers in olive oil (for ear ailments), tinctures, tablets; also an ingredient in numerous European cough and bronchial medicines.
Uses: Respiratory catarrh, earache.
Caution: No known risks associated with use.


Oats (Avena Sativa)

Also called: Oatstraw, common oat
Source: Native to the Mediterranean region; cultivated in cool temperate regions worldwide.
Parts used: Tops
Forms available: teas, tinctures, tablets, capsules, dried tops, bath products.
Uses: Cooked oats have traditionally been used to regulate the digestive system and calm nerves. It’s now known that eating oat bran reduces cholesterol. Added to baths, oats are a folk remedy for skin disorders, arthritis, and rheumatism. German health authorities have approved oats as treatment to soothe inflamed, itchy skin.
Caution: No known risks are associated with use.


Peppermint (Mentha X Piperita)

Also called: Brandy mint, lamb mint, American mint
Source: Native to Europe; commercially grown in Indiana, Wisconsin, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.
Part used: Leaf
Forms available: Teas, tinctures, essential oil, enteric-coated capsules of peppermint oil, chewing gum, mints.
Uses: Indigestion, gastrointestinal spasms, flatulence, irritable bowel syndrome, nausea, respiratory congestion.
Caution: Do not take this herb if you have insufficient hydrochloric acid in the stomach, gallbladder or bile-duct obstruction, inflammation, or related conditions. Do not give any form of peppermint to infants. Exercise caution when giving peppermint tea to children because the menthol in the herb may make them choke. Do not apply essential oil directly to mucous membranes; use the oil topically with care, dilute it in vegetable oils as directed. Do not add more than the directed amount to bath water.


Plaintain (Plantago Major, P. Lanceolata)

Also called: Hoary plantain, English plantain, greater plantain.
Source: Native to Eurasia and widely naturalized in North America
Part used: Leaf
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tablets
Uses: Catarrh, bronchitis, skin irritations. German health authorities have found plantain to be safe and effective for soothing mucous membranes and as an astringent and antibacterial.
Caution: Do not use plantain if you’re taking a bulk laxative containing psyllium seed, which comes from other Plantago species. Otherwise, plantain is generally safe. Instances of toxicity have resulted from misidentification of contamination with the leaves of Digitalis lanata.


Psyllium (Plantago Spp.)

Also called: Blond psyllium, ispaghula (P. ovate), black psyllium (P. indica)
Source: Blond psyllium is native to the Mediterranean, North Africa, and western Asia, and is grown commercially in India and Pakistan. Black psyllium is native to the Mediterranean.
Part used: Seed, seed husk
Forms available: Capsules, powders, an ingredient in bulk laxatives
Uses: Constipation, hemmorroids, lowering cholesterol
Caution: Do not use psyllium if you have intestinal obstruction. Consult your doctor before taking it if you have insulin-dependent diabetes; preparations of psyllium often contain sugar. Do not use if you are also taking plantain.


Red clover (Trifolium Pratense)

Also called: Purple clover, cleaver grass, cow grass, trefoil
Source: Native to Europe and naturalized throughout the United States.
Part used: Flowering tops
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures
Uses: Fold remedy for blood purification, bronchitis, whooping cough, asthma, skin conditions, and cancer; also a rich source of phytoestrogen isoflavones, which may help prevent cancer.
Caution: Avoid during pregnancy unless monitored by a qualified health0care practitioner.


Red Raspberry (Rubus Idaeus)

Source: Grows throughout Eurasia and North America, most of the commercial supply comes from Europe
Part used: Leaf
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tablets, tinctures
Uses: Popular as a folk remedy for painful and profuse menstruation and as a tonic during pregnancy. Also valued traditionally as an astringent treatment for diarrhea, stomach ailments, colds, mouth sores, and inflamed mucous membranes of the throat.
Caution: Red raspberry is a mild uterine stimulant. Pregnant women should consult a qualified health care practitioner before using it.


Reishi (Ganoderma Lucidum)

Also called: Ling-zhi, ling chin, ling chi mushroom
Source: Reishi mushroom grows wild on plum trees in Japan; it is commercially cultivated in China, Japan, and the United States.
Part used: Fruiting body
Forms available: Capsules, tablets, tinctures, extracts
Uses: Recommended as an immune stimulant and general tonic; also to treat anxiety, high bold pressure, hepatitis, bronchitis, and asthma.
Caution: Though rare, side effects including dry throat, nosebleeds, stomach upset, and bloody stools have been reported after three to six months of continuous use.


Rosemary (Rosemarinus Officinalis)

Source: Native to the Mediterranean, from Spain and Portugal south to the Morocco and Tunisia. Where it is also commercially grown. Some rosemary is commercially produced in the United States.
Part used: Leaf
Forms available: Teas, tinctures, extracts, essential oil; dried leaves for cooking; also an ingredient in bath and body-care products.
Uses: Upset stomach, flatulence, rheumatism, apathy, stimulating the appetite, enhancing coronary blood flow; traditionally thought to improve memory.
Caution: Rosemary and its essential oil can harm the uterus or fetus when taken in therapeutic amounts during pregnancy; amounts used in cooking are generally considered safe.


Saw Palmetto (Serenoa Repens)

Also called: Sabal
Source: Native to the southeastern United States; most of the supply is wild-harvested in Florida.
Part used: Fruit
Forms available: Capsules, tinctures. Some products are standardized to 90 percent free fatty acids.
Uses: Prostate enlargement (Benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BHP)
Caution: Rarely, people taking the herb experience cases of stomach upset. More importantly, before you take saw palmetto, consult your doctor for a diagnosis; prostate cancer has symptoms similar to BPH.


Schisandra (Schisandra Chinensis)

Also called: Magnolia vine
Source: All species of the genus Schisandra are native to East Asia except S. coccinea, which is native to the southeastern United States. Most of the commercial supply is grown in China, but some comes from Eastern Europe and Russia.
Part used: Fruit
Forms available: Tease, capsules, tinctures and combination products.
Uses: Hepatitis, liver protection tonic. Laboratory studies in conjunction with clinical trials indicate that schisandra helps normalize blood pressure, improve brain efficiency, increase endurance, build strength, and is strongly antioxidant.
Caution: In rare cases, appetite loss and stomach upset have been reported by people taking schisandra.


Siberian Ginseng (Eleuthero Senticosus)

Also called: Eleuthero, Ussurian thorny pepperbush
Source: Grows in thickets in northeast China, eastern Russia, Korea, Hokkaido (Japan’s northern island), and Eastern Europe.
Part used: Root, stem
Forms available: Capsules, tinctures, tablets
Uses: A tonic for fatigue, convalescence, stress, mental weakness, and decreased work output.
Caution: Increases the effectiveness (and side effects) of some antibiotics. Use caution if you have high blood pressure with the herb.


Skullcap (Scutellaria Lateriflora)

Also called: Mad-dog skullcap, Virginia skullcap
Source: Found in the woods of eastern North America. S. baicalrnsis, a popular species that has been the subject of recent research, grows in southwestern China and the sandy fields of northeastern China and neighboring Russia.
Part used: Whole herb
Forms available: Capsules, teas, tinctures, combination products.
Uses: Nerve tonic, sedative
Conscientious consumer information: Some bulk supplies of skullcap were found in the past to be contaminated with germander (Teucrium spp.), a plant that has been linked to liver damage. If you buy skullcap in bulk, purchase it from a reputable source.


St. John’s Wort (Hypericum Perforatum)

Source: Native to Europe and naturalized in Asia, Africa, North American, South America, and Australia. Commercially cultivated and wild harvested in Chile, the United States and Europe.
Part used: Flowering Tops
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tablets, tinctures.
Uses: Internally for milk to moderate depression; externally for cuts, burns, abrasions.


Tea Tree (Melaleuca Alternifolia)

Source: Moist areas on the northern coast of New South Wales and southern Queensland, Australia.
Part used: Essential oil
Forms available: Essential oil, vaginal suppositories, an ingredient in deodorants and other body-care products.
Uses: Candida, fungal infections, acne, sore throat (diluted and used as a gargle). Used traditionally by the aborigines as a local antiseptic.
Caution: Do not take the essential oil internally; if using as a gargle, spit out and rinse the mouth.


Turmeric (Curcuma Longa, C. Domestica)

Also called: Jiang huang, curcuma
Source: Most of the supply is imported from tropical Asia.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Capsules, tinctures, powder for cooking.
Uses: Peptic ulcers, hardening of the arteries, indigestion, liver problems. Curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric, has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cholesterol-reducing and cancer fighting properties.
Caution: Do not take this herb if you have gallstones or obstruction of the bile ducts. May interact with anticoagulant drugs.


Valerian (Valeriana Officinalis)

Also called: Garden valerian
Source: native to North America and Europe; frown commercially in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere.
Part used: Root
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tablets, tinctures, extracts, sleep-inducing preparations.
Uses: Mild sedation in the relief of insomnia and anxiety. Also relieves muscle spasms.
Caution: Though rare, minor side effects- including headaches, excitability, and insomnia- may occur with continual use.


Vitex (Vitex Agnus-Castus)

Also called: Chaste tree
Source: native to west Asia and southwestern Europe; naturalized in the southeastern United States; grown commercially in Europe
Part used: Fruit (berries)
Forms available: Teas, capsules, tinctures, tablets, combination products
Uses: Premenstrual syndrome, heavy or frequent menstruation, spotting, impaired menstrual flow, swelling and tenderness of the breasts, infertility, menopausal symptoms, and other female conditions requiring hormone regulation.
Caution: Do not use vitex if you are taking hormone replacement therapy of birth control pills. Generally not recommended for use during pregnancy. However in cases of progesterone deficiency, vitex has been administered under medical supervision to prevent miscarriage in the first trimester. Occasionally skin irritations have been reported.
User avatar
Alura Noel
 
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 4:33 am
Location: Florida
Gender: Female

Re: Alura's Book of Shadows

Postby Alura Noel » Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:22 pm

Suggested Websites for Herbs and Plants


:surprisedwitch:


I really like this link for Plant Identification among other things:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/




I also like this link for landscaping:

http://www.onlineplantguide.com/Index.aspx



This link has a list of some herbs with their uses and cautions etc. :

http://www.cloverleaffarmherbs.com/#sth ... KZxj8.dpbs


This link has some interesting free online resources:

http://www.herbgeek.com/2013/01/26/herb ... resources/



For those of you who don't mind spending some money, This CD is AWESOME. It has the history, description, cultivation, constituents, nutritional profile, character, armoatherapy use, medicinal use, applications, cautions, cosmetic uses, food recipes, ritual use, and more:
http://www.herbnet.com/item/Herbalpedia-2012-100047

And if you want to check out what's some of the things on it, check out this site: http://www.herbalpedia.com/




One website that i trust for buying organic Herbs, Essential oils, and other things.

http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/




For buying bottles and tins etc for crafts and remedies:

http://www.specialtybottle.com/
User avatar
Alura Noel
 
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 4:33 am
Location: Florida
Gender: Female

Alura's Book of Shadows: Herbal Remedies Recipes

Postby Alura Noel » Thu Jun 13, 2013 3:27 pm

I've found most of these recipes online and also from this book: http://www.amazon.com/Herbal-Drugstore- ... +drugstore

Before using any of these recipes,double check for yourself about the herbs and on how it should be used, cautions of the herbs, essential oils, whether they can be ingested or if its just an external thing. I feel that it is also best to try something in small doses to see how the body reacts to it. Some things will work for some people and not others. Experiment...


Herbal Remedies Recipes

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Anti-Itch Cream

With kids, skin irritations are a fact of life… especially during the summer when things like mosquito bites, poison ivy and other insect bites can cause skin problems.

This homemade natural anti-itch cream is a wonderful remedy for skin irritations and itching. It contains all natural ingredients and can be mixed as needed for a soothing and effective remedy.


Natural Anti-Itch Cream Ingredients:

ᵿ 1 teaspoon non-nano zinc oxide powder (optional)
ᵿ 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
ᵿ 1 teaspoon baking soda
ᵿ 2 teaspoons bentonite clay
ᵿ 1 tablespoon (approx) witch hazel (longer shelf life) or water (use within a week)
ᵿ 10 drops peppermint essential oil (optional-cooling)

How to Make:
Mix zinc oxide, sea salt, baking soda, and bentonite clay in a small bowl or jar. Slowly add witch hazel, stirring constantly, until it reaches a creamy consistency. Add essential oil if using.

Store in air tight jar and use within two weeks (one week if using water in place of witch hazel).

Long Lasting Option:
If you’d prefer not to have to make a small amount that must be used within two weeks, you can make a larger batch by mixing double or triple quantities of the dry ingredients and adding to the wet ingredients as needed for use.

I store the pre-mixed powder in an empty spice container (red jar above) and shake out into a small bowl and mix with witch hazel when I need to use it.




Black Drawing Salve

It takes a while to make but is very effective and well worth the time. We especially use it for splinters and pieces of glass that get stuck in the skin.

I have not tried it personally, but black drawing salves are also said to help remove moles and skin tags.

Black Salve Ingredients:

~ 3 Tablespoons of comfrey, calendula and plantain infused olive oil (see instructions below)
~ 2 tablespoons shea butter
~ 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil
~ 2 Tablespoons Beeswax
~ 1 teaspoon Vitamin E oil
~ 2 tablespoons Activated Charcoal Powder
~ 2 Tablespoons Kaolin Clay
~ 1 Tablespoon honey
~ 20 drops (or more) Lavender Essential Oil

What to Do:

Before making the salve, it is important to infuse olive oil with comfrey, calendula and plantain. You will need 1 tablespoon of each of the herbs, finely powdered in a food processor or blender, and 1/2 cup olive oil. It can be infused in one of these two ways:

Powder the herbs and place in a small jar. Pour oil over the herbs. Leave in jar for 3-4 weeks, shaking daily, and then strain through a cheesecloth for use.
Heat the herbs and olive oil in a double boiler. Leave on low/medium heat for about an hour until oil gets strong smelling and darker. Strain through cheesecloth for use.
Personally, I keep a big jar of olive oil with plantain, comfrey and calendula in my herb cabinet and let it constantly infuse for use in salves and lotions. When the oil is used, I discard the herbs and begin the process again.


To make the salve:

Combine infused olive oil, shea butter, coconut oil, beeswax, vitamin E oil and honey in a glass jar in a small pan of water. Heat the water to a simmer and carefully stir mixture in the jar until all ingredients are melted.

Remove from heat and add activated charcoal, kaolin clay, and lavender essential oil and mix well.

Quickly pour in to small jars or tins and let sit until hardened (several hours).

Store in airtight container and use as needed on cuts, splinters, etc.

How to Use Black Salve:

Make sure area has been cleaned well. Put a generous amount of black salve on the wound or splinter and cover with gauze or a large bandaid.

Leave at least a few hours or overnight to allow it to draw out the infection or object. Some things (like glass… in my experience) may take a day or two and several applications to draw out an object.

This salve is a wonderful natural remedy but it is not a replacement for medical care when needed. Consult a doctor before using if you have any health conditions or concerns.




Pain Relief Lotion Bars

They are a simple way to moisturize and nourish the skin and they can be easily customized for a variety of uses. This variation is one of my favorites, especially for after athletic training or on sore muscles. I don’t use it during pregnancy, but it is great at other times. I also make a diluted version by using half as much Menthol and Essential Oil and omitting the Arnica oil for use on the kids when they get growing pains.
These natural pain relief lotion bars smell excellent and work wonders on sore or tired muscles!
Ingredients:

۩ 1/3 cup coconut oil
۩ 1/3 cup shea butter, cocoa butter or mango butter
۩ 1/3 cup beeswax (can add an extra ounce or two if you want a thicker consistency, which leaves less lotion on the skin when used)
۩ 1 tablespoon of Menthol Crystals
۩ 10 drops Peppermint Essential Oil
۩ 1/2 tsp Arnica Oil (optional)
This recipe can be adjusted to make any quantity that you’d like. I made with 1/3 cup of each main ingredients, but this can adjusted up for down for bigger or smaller batches.
How to Make:
1. Combine all ingredients in a quart size glass mason jar and carefully place this jar in a small saucepan of water on the stove.
2. Turn the burner on and bring water to a low simmer. Stir ingredients constantly until they are melted and smooth.
3. Remove from heat and stir in the menthol crystals and stir until dissolved.
4. Add essential oils and arnica oil (optional) and stir until mixed.
5. Carefully pour into molds or whatever you will be allowing the lotion bars to harden in. I used these silicon loaf molds, though any mold would work.
6. Allow the lotion bars to cool completely before attempting to pop out of molds. These could be made in different shaped molds or made in a square baking pan and then cut into actual bars.
How to Use:
Store in a cool or dry place for up to six months (I've even had some last as long as a year).

To apply to skin: hold bar in hand and carefully rub on dry skin. The heat of the skin will transfer some of the lotion bar to the skin. I store my lotion bars on a small plate on my dresser and bathroom counter. Add more or less menthol for a more or less potent bar.




Herbal Cough Syrup

That being said, illnesses that include coughing (like the strain of the flu going around this year) can be exhausting and uncomfortable because they limit the ability to sleep restfully. In those cases, I use this homemade syrup to ease the coughing so the afflicted can get some rest.

Honey naturally soothes cough by itself. In fact, I’ve heard of doctors recommending a spoonful of honey to children (over a year) for cough. Ginger is naturally anti-inflammatory and has an expectorant action. Chamomile soothes muscles, making it useful in relieving the “tickle” in the throat, plus it promotes restful sleep. Marshmallow Root has one of the highest mucilaginous contents of all herbs and coats and soothes the throat. Cinnamon helps boost immune system and improve taste.

The combination of herbs helps sooth the throat to ease coughing and promote restful sleep. I only use this remedy on children over 1 year of age due to the honey, though you can substitute maple syrup in place of honey.
Homemade herbal cough syrup that soothes the throat to ease coughing and promote restful sleep.

Ingredients
ᵿ 1 quart of filtered water
ᵿ ¼ cup Ginger Root (fresh grated or dried)
ᵿ ¼ cup Chamomile Flowers
ᵿ ¼ cup Marshmallow Root
ᵿ 1 tablespoon Cinnamon
ᵿ ¼ cup lemon juice
ᵿ 1 cup honey
Instructions
1. Pour the water into a medium saucepan and add the dried herbs.
2. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer.
3. Simmer until the volume is reduced by about half. (You will need 1 cup of liquid after herbs are strained off)
4. Pour through a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth to remove herbs (compost the herbs!).
5. While liquid is still warm (not boiling) mix with lemon juice and honey and stir well.
Store in airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 months.
Notes
I give 1 teaspoon to children and 1 tablespoon to adults as needed for symptoms.




Healing Lip Salve

This recipe is also great for guys and for kids as it isn’t brightly colored or strongly scented. This recipe incorporates optional healing herbs that help heal and protect the lips, but you can leave these ingredients out to have an unscented and simply moisturizing version. Homemade healing lip balm/salve also lasts forever, since a little goes a really long way.

The herbal ingredients are naturally moisturizing, antibacterial and antifungal, and some people have success with using it to speed healing of cold sores. It doesn’t contain petroleum or chemicals like most commercial lip products so you can feel safe using it on yourself of your kids.

All ingredients and tins and lip chap containers to store it in are available here. (Storing in a lip-chap container makes it portable and easy to apply. )

You Will Need:

ᶲ 1 cups of olive or almond oil
ᶲ 1 teaspoon echinacea root (optional)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon comfrey leaf (optional)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon of plantain leaf (herb-not banana!)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon of calendula flowers (optional)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon yarrow flowers (optional)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon of rosemary leaf (optional)
ᶲ 1/4 cup beeswax pastilles
ᶲ 1/2 tsp grapefruit seed extract or vitamin E oil to preserve (optional)
ᶲ 5-10 drops peppermint essential oil for scent/cooling/soothing (optional)
How To Make Healing Salve:

Infuse the herbs into the olive oil. There are two ways to do this. You can either combine the herbs and the olive oil in a jar with an airtight lid and leave 3-4 weeks, shaking daily OR heat the herbs and olive oil over low/low heat in a double boiler for 3 hours (low heat!) until the oil is very green. You can also omit this step completely, or just a drop of each of the essential oils instead.
Strain the herbs out of the oil by pouring through a cheesecloth. Let all the oil drip out and then squeeze the herbs to get the remaining oil out.
Discard the herbs.
Heat 1/4 cup of the infused oil in a double boiler with the beeswax until melted and mixed. (save the extra oil for use on wounds/cuts or for another batch of lip salve).
Pour into small tins, glass jars or lip chap tubes and use on dry or chapped lips.




Natural Vapor-Rub

For babies and small children especially, treatment options are limited, but congestion and coughing can really interfere with their ability to sleep well.

If you don’t have the ingredients or don’t want to take the time to make this recipe, mixing the essential oils with coconut oil works almost as well. All ingredients for the recipe below (including tins or lip chap containers to keep it in) are available here.

Homemade Vapor-Rub Ingredients:

ᶲ 1/2 cup olive oil, coconut oil or almond oil
ᶲ 2 level tablespoons of beeswax pastilles
ᶲ 20 drops of Eucalyptus Oil
ᶲ 20 drops Peppermint Oil
ᶲ 10 drops Rosemary Oil
ᶲ 10 drops cinnamon or clove oil (optional)

How To Make Vapor Rub:

1. Melt beeswax with oil of choice in a double boiler until just melted.
2. Add the essential oils (use half the amount for a baby version or dilute with coconut oil before using)
3. Stir until well mixed and pour into some type of container with a lid to store. Little tins work well, as do small jars. I also always make a few in lip chap sticks to keep in my purse or use on baby feet.
Use as needed to help sooth coughing and congestion.
Note: Make sure to dilute for babies and children and use as little as is needed. Can also make with the herbs instead of essential oils by infusing the oil with 1 tablespoon of each of the herbs in a double boiler over medium heat for 2 hours.




Homemade Healing Salve

Helpful on cuts, bruises, stings, poison ivy and skin irritations. It also helps diaper rash and baby skin irritations- just don’t use with cloth diapers or line them first. This salve is naturally antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal and astringent. It also doesn’t contain petroleum! I never goes bad, so I make it in big batches, but you can reduce the size if needed. I always keep this on hand while gardening for skin irritations and bug bites.

You Will Need:

ᶲ 2 cups of olive or almond oil
ᶲ 1 tsp echinacea root (optional)
ᶲ 2 tablespoons comfrey leaf
ᶲ 2 tablespoons of plantain leaf (herb-not banana!)
ᶲ 1 tablespoon of calendula flowers (optional)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon yarrow flowers (optional)
ᶲ 1 teaspoon of rosemary leaf (optional)
ᶲ 1/4 cup beeswax pastilles
ᶲ 1/2 tsp grapefruit seed extract or vitamin E oil to preserve

How To Make Healing Salve:

1. Infuse the herbs into the olive oil. There are two ways to do this. You can either combine the herbs and the olive oil in a jar with an airtight lid and leave 3-4 weeks, shaking daily OR heat the herbs and olive oil over low/low heat in a double boiler for 3 hours (low heat!) until the oil is very green.
2. Strain her herbs out of the oil by pouring through a cheesecloth. Let all the oil drip out and then squeeze the herbs to get the remaining oil out.
3. Discard the herbs.
Heat the infused oil in a double boiler with the beeswax until melted and mixed.
Pour into small tins, glass jars or lip chap tubes and use on bites, stings, cuts, poison ivy, diaper rash or other wounds as needed.




How to Make Elderberry Syrup for Flu Prevention

If you or your child has ever had a bad case of the flu, you know how miserable it can be. Especially for moms, it is awful to see your children feeling so bad and not be able to fix it. Black elderberries (sambucus nigra) have been shown to prevent flu and speed recovery in those who have the flu.
Elderberries contain high levels of A, B and C and stimulate the immune system. Several natural elderberry syrups are available at health stores or online, but usually for around $15 or more for 4-8 ounces. This recipe makes 16 ounces for a cost of under ten dollars and kids love the taste!

Homemade Elderberry Syrup Ingredients:
ᶲ 2/3 cup black elderberries
o cups of water
ᶲ 2 T fresh or dried ginger root
ᶲ 1 tsp cinnamon powder
ᶲ 1/2 tsp cloves or clove powder
ᶲ 1 cup raw honey (we get from our farmer’s market)

How to Make Elderberry Syrup:
1. Pour water into medium saucepan and add elderberries, ginger, cinnamon and cloves (do not add honey!)
2. Bring to a boil and then cover and reduce to a simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour until the liquid has reduced by almost half. At that point, remove from heat and let cool enough to be handled. Pour through a strainer into a glass jar or bowl.
3. Discard the elderberries (or compost them!) and let the liquid cool to lukewarm. When it is no longer hot, add 1 cup of honey and stir well.
4. When honey is well mixed into the elderberry mixture, pour the syrup into a pint sized mason jar or 16 ounce glass bottle of some kind.


Ta Da! You just made homemade elderberry syrup! Store in the fridge and take daily for its immune boosting properties. Some sources recommend taking only during the week and not on the weekends to boost immunity.

Standard dose is 1/2 tsp to 1 tsp for kids and 1/2 Tbsp to 1 Tbsp for adults. If the flu does strike, take the normal dose every 2-3 hours instead of once a day until symptoms disappear.




Sweet Dreams Sleep Tincture Recipe

This recipe is good for adults too, if you struggle with insomnia or anxiety. It is a mildly and naturally relaxing and calming tincture that is great for sleep disturbances. All of the ingredients are available here and the minimum quantity available to order will make quarts of this tincture!

Ingredients:
ᶲ 2 TBSP dried Yarrow flowers (relaxing and nutrient packed)
ᶲ 2 TBSP dried Catnip (naturally calming)
ᶲ 2 TBSP dried Oatstraw (also helps with bed wetting)
ᶲ 2 TBSP Chamomile flowers (calming and relaxing)
ᶲ 1 TBSP dried Mint leaves
ᶲ 1 TBSP dried Hops flowers
ᶲ 1 TBSP dried stevia leaf
ᶲ boiling water
ᶲ 2 cups 80 proof or stronger vodka or rum
ᶲ glass quart size canning jar with airtight lid

Instructions:
1. Put all herbs in glass jar
2. Pour boiling water to just cover the herbs and mix well
3. Fill the jar the rest of the way with vodka or rum alcohol (don’t use rubbing alcohol!)
4. Cap with airtight lid and leave in cool, dark place for at least 2 and up to 8 weeks, shaking daily.
5. After several weeks, strain the herbs out and store in small tincture bottles for use as needed.
Normal dose is 2-3 droppersful for adults and 1 dropperful for kids over two.
I order all the ingredients that I don’t grow in my garden from Mountain Rose Herbs, which is the best source I”ve found, but you may be able to find some of these locally. Start with a very small dose, especially in children, as it typically works very well, even at low-doses.





Herbal Digestion Remedy Tincture

It is simple to make, but very effective against early pregnancy nausea, motion sickness and tummy aches that happen when the kids eat unhealthy food when we are not at home.

To curb morning sickness, and even for stomach bugs to help stop vomiting. It also works great for indigestion, heartburn and other digestive disturbances.

This digestive remedy can be used externally on babies tummies for colic and gas and externally on the head (adult or child) for headaches.


Ingredients
ᶲ ½ cup dried peppermint leaves
ᶲ ¼ cup-1/2 cup very finely diced fresh ginger root
ᶲ ¼ cup dried fennel seeds
ᶲ Approximately 1½ cups boiling water
ᶲ Approximately 1½ cups vodka or rum
ᶲ quart size glass jar with airtight lid
Instructions
1. Put peppermint, ginger and fennel in glass jar and pour boiling water until they are just covered.
2. Fill the rest of the jar with vodka or rum (food grade only! no rubbing alcohol) and put on air tight lid.
3. Keep in a cool dark place for at least two weeks, but up to six, shaking daily.
4. After 2-6 weeks, strain through mesh strainer or cheesecloth and store in vials or small jars.

Dosage: for adults up to 1 tsp can be taken straight or in water as needed.
For heartburn indigestion or nausea, one dose is usually sufficient, though sometimes a second dose is needed.
In pregnancy, ½ tsp in the morning often helps with morning sickness, with additional doses if needed throughout the day.
For children, 10-20 drops is usually enough, or it can be used externally.

If you are pregnant, nursing, or have a medical condition, you should check with your doctor or midwife before using any herbal remedy or supplement.




Homemade Chamomile Tincture

Chamomile is one of my favorite herbs because of its delicate scent and great taste in teas. It is my absolute favorite herb for kids and I keep a tincture of Chamomile on hand for any childhood aches and ailments.

Chamomile is a naturally calming herb that relaxes nerves and reduces pain. It has been known to settle the stomach and reduce gas and colic in infants. I use Chamomile to sooth fussy babies, calm down upset toddlers and and on bruises.

Adults can use Chamomile to improve sleep, to ease menstrual cramps, relieve headache and sooth frayed nerves. Chamomile is also great for the skin and can even naturally lighten hair.

Making tinctures also helps preserve herbs, which is especially important for Chamomile, since its positive benefits are in its volatile oils which decrease over time unless preserved.

Chamomile Tincture Ingredients:
ᶲ 1/2 to 1 cup of fresh or freshly dried Chamomile flowers
ᶲ approximately 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups boiling water
ᶲ approximately 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups vodka or rum
ᶲ Quart size glass jar with airtight lid

Instructions:
1. Put fresh or dried Chamomile flowers in clean quart size glass jar
2. Pour boiling water over flowers to just cover them (may have to stir)
3. Fill the rest of the jar with vodka or rum (do not use rubbing alcohol or non-consumable alcohol!) and tightly cover with airtight lid.
4. Store in a cool, dark place and shake daily for 4-6 weeks. This will make a strong tincture!
5. After 4-6 weeks, remove from cabinet, and pour through a cheesecloth or strainer. Store in a jar or in tincture vials for easy use.

Normal dose for adults is up to 1 tsp 1-3 times a day as needed.
For infants, only a few drops are needed, and often it can be rubbed on the gums or stomach for teething or colic pain.
For toddlers and older children 1/4 to 1/2 tsp can be taken 1-3 times a day while needed.
It is especially useful for babies and young children who are having difficulty sleeping. A dose right before bedtime can help relax and sooth them for more peaceful sleep.

Any herb can be preserved with this method, and often this is the most cost effective way to use herbs. Any herbs I don’t grow myself, I get from this website. Another tincture I keep on hand is my homemade Herbal Digestive Remedy Tincture, which is also very simple to make!




Herbal Cough Drops

Most cough drops contain sugar and preservatives, and some even contain artificial colors, flavors or chemicals!

Ingredients
1 cup of water infused with herbs. I used slippery elm, coltsfoot, cinnamon, elderberry and chamomile
1.5 cups of honey (I use raw, organic honey from here)
A candy thermometer (not necessary but very helpful!)
a medium size sauce pan
Silicon candy molds (not needed but helpful)


Instructions
Boil 2 cups of water and infuse with desired herbs. I used about ¼ cup of each herb for a really potent cough drop, but as little as 1 tablespoon of each herb is effective. To infuse: Pour boiling water over herbs. I put herbs in a muslin bag to make straining easier. Let steep for 20 minutes and strain out herbs (or remove bag).
Pour 1 cup of the herb infused water and 1.5 cups of honey into a medium saucepan and turn on medium high heat. (save the extra liquid and mix with equal parts raw honey for a simple cough syrup)
Stir the honey/herb mixture over medium high heat until it reaches 300 degrees. If you don’t have a candy thermometer, this usually takes about 30 minutes and can be tested by dropping a drop of the mixture in to ice water to see if it immediately hardens. It should harden to the point that it breaks if dropped on the counter. You can also tell because the mixture will start to foam and separate. At this point, it is vital to remove it from the heat quickly so it does not burn.
Pour into candy molds, or pour into a large baking sheet that has been greased with coconut oil or that has a silicon baking mat on it.
Let cool until it can be touched and molded and immediately and quickly form into lozenges with your hands (you might need help to do this quickly enough).
Put finished cough drops/lozenges on a silicon mat or piece of parchment paper to cool.
When completely cool, I toss in a mixture of powdered slippery elm and stevia to keep from getting sticky in humidity.

Use as needed for coughing, congestion or sore throat.

Notes
Any herbs can be used. I picked the combination above to help sooth coughing, congestion and sore throat while boosting the immune system. I get all herbs from Mountain Rose Herbs.




Blister Balm
Minor cuts, abrasions, burns, and fungal infections

½ oz dried calendula blossoms
½ oz. dried comfry root
2 cups almond, olive, or vegetable oil
½ cup finely chopped beeswax.
10 drops lavender essential oil
10 drops tea tree essential oil

Combine herbs and vegetable oil in crock pot.
Turn the crock pot to its lowest settting, cover and also to heat gently two to 4 hours, checking and stirring frequently to prevent burning. When the oil is yellow in color and has an herby smell, it’s down.
Strain through a coffee filter or piece of clean cloth into a large measuring cup.
To each cup of infused oil, and ¼ cup beeswax.
Heat the oil and beeswax together over very low heat until the beeswax is completely melted. Do not allow to boil or burn.
Test the consistency by placing a Tbsp. of the mixture in the freezer for a minute or two until cool. The balm should be the consistency of an easily spreadable paste.
If too thin, add a little more beeswax
If too thick, add a little bit more oil

Remove from heat, quickly add the essential oils.
Pour into clean glass container.





Body Powder for Odor Control
Under the arms, or wherever odor originates

½ cup cornstarch
½ cup baking soda
1 tbsp. sage, ground
1 tbsp. rosemary, ground

Mix ingredients together and put in a clean container.





Grandma’s Sunburn Cures
ӂ Cook 3 tbsp of dry oatmeal in ½ cup water, let cool, wrap in a quazy cloth, and apply to the burn
ӂ Wrap ½ cup of dry oatmeal in a cheesecloth and let steep in 3 cups water for 15 minutes. Apply the cool liquid to the burn (I like to use spray bottles)
ӂ Wrap 1 cup of dry oatmeal in a cloth or pour into a clean athletic soak. Tie a knot at the top. Put it in a tub of tepid water to soak for 10 minutes, then add yourself.
ӂ Purchase a commercial oatmeal product that dissolves in water and add to your bath.





Canker Sore Swab
Use this gel as often as hourly throughout the day, until your canker sore heals

1 tsp. Echinacea tincture
1 tsp. goldenseal tincture
1 teaspoon calendula tincture
1 tsp. grapefruit seed extract
1 tbsp. aloe vera gel

Mix all the ingredients in a small jar. To use, place a pea-size amount of the gel on a clean piece of gauze; hold in the mouth against the sore. Or use a q-tip to brush it on.




Basic Cold and Flu Tea
Blend combines herbs to soothe the symptoms of the usual cold and flu symptoms with ones that fight viruses and bacteria.
To make 1 cup of tea blend:
¼ cup dried peppermint leaves
¼ cup dried lemon balm leaves
¼ cup dried elder flowers
¼ cup dried yarrow flower
Store in an airtight jar away from heat and light for up to one year.
To make 1 cup of tea:
1 cup water
1-2 tsp. tea blend
½-1 teaspoon fresh grated chilled ginger
Honey
Lemon juice

Bring water to a boil, then remove from heat.
Add tea and ginger.
Steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
Strain; add honey and lemon




Healthy Scalp Rinse
Antifungal and soothing properties. The vinegar helps restore the hair’s correct pH (Dandruff)

2 cups apple cider vinegar
¼ cup sage, rosemary, or thyme leave, or any combination of them

Heat the vinegar just to the boiling point. Remove from heat and add the herbs.
Cover and steep for 10 minutes.
Strain; discard the herbs.
Pour into empty shampoo bottle and label.
Use about ¼ cup in 2 cups water as a rinse after shampooing.




Swimmer’s Eardrops
If you have a tendency to getr swimmer’s ear or feel the beginnings of an ear infection.

¼ cup white vinegar
¼ cup rubbing alcohol
One of the following:
2-3 drops grapefruit seed extract
3 drops garlic tincture
3-5 drops Echinacea

Sterlize a 4 oz bottle. Boil it for 10 minutes in water.
Mix all ingredients in the bottle.
Store out of light.

To use, put a few drops into the ear with a sterile eyedropper. Allow it to run out of the ear.




Endometriosis Tea
Drink 2 cups of this tea per day for 2 weeks for a single course of treatment.

1 tsp. vitex berries
1 tsp. red clover blossoms
1 tsp. wild yam root
1 tsp. cramp bark
½ tsp. horsetail
½ tsp. red raspberries leaves
½ tsp. motherwort
1 quart water

In a medium saucepan, combine the herbs and water and bring to a boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat, cover, and let steep for an additional 15 minutes. Strain and discard the herbs.




Mushroom energy tea
Remedy for fatigue

1/3 oz. chopped or powdered reishi mushroom
3 cups water

Combine the water and mushroom in a pot with a lid. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain. Drink in divided doses throughout the day; refrigerate for up to 3 days.




Bacteria-Fighting Gum Rinse
Help heal inflamed gums

5 drops goldenseal tincture
5 drops myrhh tinchture
2 cloves crushed garlic
1 dash of cayenne
2 cups water
Combine all the ingredients. Swish in the mouth for 2 to 3 minutes, three or four times per day.



RX for Hemorrhoids
This blend combines soothing herbs that foster wound healing with cooling, astringent witch hazel

4 tbsp. distilled witch hazel
½ tbsp. comfrey tincture
½ tbsp. horse chestnut tincture
50 drops lavender essential oil
50 drops cypress essential oil

Combine all the ingredients in an airtight, dark glass bottle with a tight lid and label.
Store away from heat and light.

To use, shake well and apply gently with a cotton ball twice a day and after each bowel movement.




Aloe and Herbs Shingles Gel

2 cups aloe vera gel
1/4 cup lemon balm leaves
1/4 cup St. John's wort
1/8 cup dried licorice root
2 tbsp. cayenne or turmeric
8 drops of bergamot, lemon, tea tree, or lavender essential oil

Blend first five ingredients in a quart sized jar. Let sit for 24 hours at room temperature.
Strain through tightly woven cloth into a clean jar
Add the essential oil and cap tightly.
Store in the refrigerator.

Apply to a test path of normal skin. If it burns on contact, add more aloe vera gel. if it doesn't heat up enough, you can add a little bit more cayenne pepper.

Apply to rash three to five times per day,as needed.

If the cayenne pepper burns too much, omit it and use turmeric.



Pimple Juice

If you’re dealing with unsightly blemishes (or maybe your teenager or someone you love is waging the hormonal battle), make this up today . It’ll be ready in a couple of weeks and will last a long while. I've halved the recipe here, but you could make a bigger batch too.

1/4 ounce powdered goldenseal
1/4 ounce powdered echinacea root
1/4 ounce powdered black walnut hull
1/4 ounce myrrh powder
1 cup rubbing alcohol

Combine the herbs well and put into a wide-mouthed jar. Pour the alcohol over it all and twist on a tight-fitting lid. Let the mixture infuse in a warm cupboard, but remember to shake it once a day to let the herbs move around and do their magic. (Sometimes I need to write a little reminder note to myself about the shaking).

It’s actually a good idea to stop shaking the jar a couple of days before straining. That way the herbs will settle at the bottom and the whole straining process will be easier.

After two or three weeks, strain the herbs out using a cheesecloth draped over a hand-held strainer. If you have some around, add a drop or two of tea tree oil to the strained mixture. This will boost its effectiveness, but it’s not totally necessary.

Use cotton balls to apply the juice several times a day to pimples that are begging to be squeezed.

Bonus tip: For a night time pimple treatment, mix some of the pimple juice with green clay.




Onion Cough Syrup 1


Ingredients:
2 large onions
Raw honey

{The herbs below are completely optional. Their properties make the syrup even more effective, but it it works great without them. If you have licorice and wild cherry bark on hand like I do, throw it in! :)}
2 TBS. Licorice root
2 TBS. Wild Cherry Bark

Directions:
Cut 2 large onions and place in double boiler (if you have one).
Cover with raw honey at least 1/2 inch above the onions.
Add 2 TBS. licorice root and 2 TBS. wild cherry bark {optional}.

Simmer on very low heat until the onions become translucent. If you don't have a double boiler, you can simmer it very gently in a pan for about 20 minutes. A double boiler is better because the pan being directly on the heat will take more of the beneficial properties from the raw honey. Strain the onions and herbs out and store in a jar in the refrigerator up to 3 months.

Dosage:
Adults can take 1 Tbs. and children 1 tsp. of the syrup up to every 15 mins as needed. Allow the syrup to slowly trickle down the throat as you take it. If you don't have the licorice or wild cherry bark, you can use this same recipe with just the onions and raw honey for a very effective syrup! You can also make a cough syrup out of just the wild cherry bark and licorice, but that is a different recipe.



*You can take this remedy for coughs up to every 15 minutes if the cough is really bad, whereas store-bought medicine can typically only be taken every few hours.



Onion Cough and Cold Syrup 2


Ingredients:
1 cup freshly chopped onion

About 1/2 cup raw honey

Plus any of the following (optional):
1 tsp. Cloves (whole or powdered)- specifically good for pain relief

1-2 Tbsp. Slippery Elm (dried or powdered)- Slippery Elm has more of a reputation for soothing and coating the throat

1-2 Tbsp. fresh chopped Ginger root OR 1 tsp. Ginger powder- Ginger increases warmth, circulation (important for healing) and the overall effectiveness of the syrup

1-2 Tbsp. dried Mullein and/or Marshmallow Root. Marshmallow is very helpful for soothing throat irritations and calming coughs, and Mullein is an expectorant, good at clearing up hacking coughs and congestion.

**You can include all of these optional herbs, but at a maximum of 2 Tbsp. extra herbs total


Directions
Put chopped onions and any herbs of choice into a small stainless steel or glass pot (not aluminum). Add enough honey to cover the onions ( for me, this seemed to be about 1/2 a cup, though I didn't measure exactly).

Turn the pot on low heat and slowly simmer. The honey will soften and become liquidy, and you want to keep the temperature very low while allowing the herbs to steep in the honey. It's best to keep a lid on to help keep all of the medicinal properties of the herbs in the syrup, and just take the lid off to give it a quick stir every few minutes to ensure it doesn't burn at all (though the temp. should be low enough to prevent this).

Give it 20 minutes of simmering, then remove it from the heat. Strain the onions and herbs out and store the remaining honey (which might have flecks of herb in it and this is fine) in a small glass jar with a lid and keep it in the fridge.

The syrup can be used as often as needed, up to every half hour. Here are the dosages:

1 tsp. for a younger child

1 Tbsp. for anyone 10 years and older





Curing Athlete’s Foot (Anti-Fungal Cream Recipe!)


Ingredients:

7 tbsp. extra virgin organic coconut oil (not refined)
40 drops Grapefruit Seed Extract
1/2 tsp. tea tree oil
4 oz. glass jar
Directions:

In a double boiler over low heat, melt the coconut oil. Add the GSE and TTO and stir together to combine. Pour the mixture into the glass jar and let it cool completely. Apply as needed to skin suffering from any type of fungal infection, including yeast infection (please don’t apply directly to any internal parts; if you have yeast-like rashes on your arms or legs though, apply there!).

Apply until it clears up.





Slippery Elm “Candies” for Coughs


Slippery Elm is wonderful for pesky coughs. It helps soothe irritations, moisten dry throats and calm coughs. When paired with raw honey (which is naturally antibacterial, antiseptic and antifungal) it provides a wonderful natural remedy for coughs.

Slippery Elm “Candies”
These are so easy to make. Make sure to always have some slippery elm powder on hand.

Equipment: Small bowl

¼ cup slippery elm powder (buy slippery elm powder here)
3 tablespoons raw honey (I use local raw clover creamed)
3 tablespoons raw cacao powder or carob powder
½ - 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon gluten free organic vanilla extract (I use Simply Organic)


1. In a small bowl, add all ingredients. With clean hands, mix to combine until it forms a dough.

2. Break off small pieces of dough (about ½ - 1 teaspoon) and roll into little balls. You can also roll dough into a thin “snake” and break off small pieces to roll into balls.

3. Place in a bowl and leave out on the counter covered. They will start to dry out a little becoming more like a lozenge. They can be consumed right away as is or when they have dried.


Yield: Makes about 40 mini "candies."

Dosage: Suck on these “candies” as often as needed. Safe for children too (not babies due to the raw honey).

Note: If you do not care for cacao or carob, omit and replace with extra slippery elm powder




Stress Relief Tea
Get relief from menopause symptoms with this easy-to-make stress relief tea.


• 1 part valerian
• 1 part chamomile
• 1 part passionflower
• 1 part skullcap
• 1/2 part lavender
• 1/2 part orange peel

1. Mix the herbs together in the amount you need. Use 1 teaspoon of the blend for each cup of water.

2. Pour boiling water over the herbs and steep for 10 to 15 minutes. As a bonus, this Stress Relief Tea is also good for digestion.




Migraine Tincture

Supplies needed
-Solvent (i.e. 100 proof alcohol or vegetable glycerin)
-quart sized glass mason jar
-4 oz. fresh or 2 oz. of dried herbs

Ingredients
-3 parts lemon balm
-2 parts feverfew
-100 proof vodka to fill

Method
1. Measure your herbs depending on whether you are using fresh or dried herbs.
2. If using fresh herbs, chop until fine.
3. Add herbs to glass jar.
4. Pour solvent over herbs to fill the jar. The solvent should rise 1-2 inches above the herbs.
5. Place the lid on the jar and shake until the herbs are well combined.
6. Label jar with contents and date.
7. Set in a warm, sunny window and steep for 2-6 weeks, shaking daily.
8. Strain with a cheesecloth, compost the plant material, and place tincture in dark colored bottles for storage in a cool, dark place. The tincture should keep for up to 5 years.
Adult Dosage
At the sudden onset of migraine symptoms, begin taking 1/4-1/2 a teaspoon of the tincture every 30 minutes to an hour until symptoms subside.




Eczema Healing Salve Recipe

1 cup Sweet Almond Oil
1/2 cup Grapeseed Oil
1/4 cup (or 4 Tbsp) Coconut Oil (unfractionated)
1/4 cup Jojoba Oil
2 Tbsp Avocado Oil
2 Tbsp Neem Oil *optional
1 Tbsp Evening Primrose Oil
1 Tbsp Meadowfoam Oil *optional

20g Licorice Root
16g Comfrey Leaf
11g Calendula Flower
6g Plantain Leaf
4g Red Roses (petals) *optional
20 drops Lavender Essential Oil
1.5oz Beeswax granules/pastilles (yellow beeswax)
1 tsp Stearic Acid (thickener)
1/2 tsp Germaben II E (preservative)

Place the Coconut Oil over heat first so that it can melt before adding the other already fluid oils (except for Lavender EO...don't add this yet!!). Once completely melted, add the remaining oils and stir. Next add in all the dried herbs/flowers, making sure they are completely covered by the oil. Allow this to either sit in sunlight for several weeks, shaking daily, or use the heat method and allow to infuse for 5 hours. I did the latter, making sure to stir frequently the entire 5 hours (not nonstop, just frequently).

Once oils and herbs have completed infusing, strain through a strainer into another clean Pyrex measuring glass or bowl. Allow this "strained" oil to sit (while melting beeswax) to allow for further sediment from the herbs to settle to the bottom.

You can now add in the beeswax to the top of a double boiler placed over low heat and stir continuously until it has all melted. Now that it's fluid, carefully pour the oil into the top of the double boiler as well, being careful to not add ALL the oil - stop short so that you don't pour in the sediment from the bottom. Also add in the Stearic Acid and stir continuously until everything has been mixed thoroughly. Remove from heat and allow it to cool for a couple of minutes. Add in Lavender essential oil and Germaben, stirring it in to mix well. Now carefully pour the mixture into jars/containers, leaving lids off until the salve has cooled and hardened.




Dandelion Salve
sore muscles, achy & arthritic joints, rough, chapped skin
Dandelion salve is especially ideal for those who work outdoors and with their hands a lot!


3.5 ounces (100 grams) of dandelion infused oil
.5 ounces (15 grams) of beeswax pastilles


To make Infused oil:
To make our salve, we first need to create an infused oil. The problem with using freshly picked dandelions for this is that they have such a high water content, that your oil will get a little sludgy and yucky sometimes, with a higher likelihood of spoilage.

To solve that problem, I spread my dandelions out in a single layer on a plain paper towel and let them wilt overnight.

The next day, I add them to a jar and pour olive or some other light oil, such as sunflower or sweet almond oil, over them – all the way almost to the top of the jar.

The size of the jar will depend on how many dandelions you have. For a small amount of dandelions, use a small jar; if your supply is large, use a bigger jar. Don’t get hung up on precise numbers and amounts. You’re basically filling some type of container about 1/2 to 3/4 full with wilted dandelion flowers then covering them with oil.

Set the jar gently into a pan of warm water and heat slowly over medium lowish heat. Let the oil stay in the heated water for several hours then remove.

At this point, you can go ahead and strain the oil and use in your salve or you can let it infuse several days longer in a dark cabinet. Another option is to strain the oil then do the whole process again with freshly wilted flowers and the first batch of dandelion oil. This is a double infusion.

You can also use this oil as a massage oil – it’s especially nice if you add a few drops of soothing lavender essential oil to it.

To make the salve:

I like to put a little tamanu oil in most things I make because it is simply the best all around skin healing agent I’ve experienced (to date), so I use about 3 ounces of dandelion oil and .5 ounces of tamanu when I do that. If you don’t have any tamanu oil on hand though, no worries. Just use what you have!

Add the oil and beeswax pastilles into a heat proof container. Set it gently into a pan containing several inches of water (just like we used when we infused our dandelion oil.) Gently bring the temperature up to medium-lowish heat and let the container stay in the makeshift double boiler until the wax is melted.

Remove from heat and carefully pour into tins or jars then let sit until firm. This sized batch makes about four ounces of salve. One batch filled two of the 2 ounce glass jars shown with a tiny bit leftover.





Comfrey Plantain Salve

One of the most common uses of Comfrey extract is as a skin treatment. The plant contains the small organic molecule allantoin, which is thought to stimulate cell growth and repair while simultaneously depressing inflammation. Scientists and physicians agree that the use of Comfrey should be restricted to topical use.

Plantain salves are used as moisturizers and to treat a host of skin conditions ranging from eczema to stretch marks. Plantain is an astringent herb, so it is topically used to treat bee stings, insect bites, scratches, burns and sores.

I like to combine comfrey and plantain into one beautiful, green salve. Together, they work to reduce a variety of skin irritations and encourage cell growth. The balm made from these two plants offers a remedy for stubborn diaper rashes, eczema, burns, and psoriasis.



Ingredients:
2 oz Comfrey leaves, dried
2 oz Plantain leaves, dried
2 oz Chickweed, dried (optional)
2 oz Chamomile, dried (optional)
Vitamin E
Olive Oil
Beeswax

Directions:
1. Combine herbs in a glass mason jar.
2. Pour enough olive oil to cover the herbs, leaving 1/2 inch head space.
3. Leave on the counter to infuse for 4-6 weeks.
4. Strain oil through a cheesecloth. Reserve the herb-infused oil and compost the plant material. Repeat steps 1-4 two to three times for a double or triple infusion.
5. In a double boiler over very low heat, add the herbal oil and beeswax. Depending on how hard you’d like your salve, add 1-2 oz of beeswax per 8 oz of oil.
6. Add Vitamin E and stir.
7. Once melted, pour the mixture into small containers.

An herbal salve prepared in this fashion should keep in a cool, dark place for up to 5 years.




Homemade "Vicks Vapor shower disks"
Have you seen the commercials for the Vicks Vapor shower disk thingies? You put one of these disks in your shower, and voila thanks to the vapors in it, you're magically healed, your cold is gone, and your face is shockingly free of snot. I always used to watch the "Noxema girl" splashing water on her face and wondered how she was able to wash her face without being completely overrun with boogers. I'm the only one? Yes? Ok, moving along then...

Regardless, Vicks makes these things and I'm sure they're super expensive for something that is just going to wash down your drain.

You know where I'm going with this, right?

Yep.

I made them myself.

The idea started a few weeks ago when my sweet little nephew Parker came down with Croup for like the 1,438th time. My sister mentioned that they were taking long steamy showers with him to try to clear out his lungs. My brain started churning and I thought "surely there can be something they could add to the shower to help him even more". Homemade Vicks Vapor shower disk thingies were born.

And they couldn't be any simpler.


Sarah's Homemade Vicks Shower Disk Thingies
-Baking soda
-Water
-Essential oils: eucalyptus, rosemary, and lavender.
-Muffin tin
-Muffin liners

1) Add baking soda to a mixing bowl. Updated to add - I don't really measure. Maybe 2-3 cups?

2) Slowly add water until you've made a thick paste. Updated to add: add just a little water a time. You'll want the mix to feel like putty.

3) Add 15 drops of each essential oil.

4) Spoon in to a muffin tin, and let sit out for 12-18 hours. You can also bake these, but I just left them out overnight.

5) Pop these suckers out of the paper liner, plop it in your shower, and let the essential oils steam away your stuffy nose. Edited to add: put them anywhere on the floor of the shower; it doesn't matter where!

Added 4/7/12 - for anyone who is having issues with these being "crumbly", try using 1 cup of baking soda and 1/3 cup of water (plus maybe a few tbslp more) and baking for 20 minutes at 350. THEN add a few drops of each essential oils to the cooled "puck". That was a suggestion from a commenter and I tried it this morning with great success! I'm a quick shower taker (less than 5 min), and my "disk" was only about 1/3 gone at the end of the shower.

Added 10/2/12 - if you're not using a silicone muffin tin, remove the liners before the pan has completely cooled. And yes, you need to remove these from the liners in order to use. You can store these in an plastic container, mason jar, etc.
User avatar
Alura Noel
 
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 4:33 am
Location: Florida
Gender: Female

Alura's Book of Shadows: Cooking W/ Moon + Food Index

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:40 pm

http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Moonlight ... +moonlight

Cooking with the Moon + Brief Food Index




The Waxing Moon

The lesson of the crescent moon reflects the Goddess in her maiden aspect, full of promise and potential. This moon phase brings growth and renewal. It is a time for strengthening, energizing, and supporting creativity. As goddesses in the kitchen, this is the perfect time to try new recipes, experiment, stock our pantries, and expand or cooking skills.
When planning meals during the waxing moon, choose foods that build up strength, invigorate the mind and revitalize body and soul. In working with magical intentions, set goals and visualize dreams coming true. Let your cooking conjure abundance, creativity, healing and true love. Stir sauce and soups desoil (clockwise) with purpose, using appropriate herbs and spices to enhance your intention.


Kitchen Blessing for the Waxing Moon

Brigid, Goddess of the hearth and fire
Ignite out heart with your poetic spirit,
Bright as flame- courageous, bountiful and true.
Keep abundant our pantry, our friends and our generosity.
Bless our table always with gentle nourishment and a welcoming chair
Sanctify this home with peace and safety.
Watch over this kitchen so that it may always be rich in love and laughter. Blessed be!


During the waxing phase of the moon, select natural tonics that stimulate the body and foods that build strength.

Recipes calling for fish, chicken, meat, beans, grains, or yogurt are all strengthening. Build a meal around a pasta smothered with roasted vegetables, olive oil, and freshly shaved parmesan cheese. Experiment with new flavors and try a new recipes that features spices you don’t ordinarily use.

Vegetables such as broccoli, carrots, corn and sweet potatoes are chock-full of immune boosting vitamins. Choose a variety of vegetables in every color and use them in soups and stews, roasted dinners and stir-fries.

Sweets such as puddings, ice creams, and yogurt smoothies are calorie and calcium rich. In warm weather try a new sorbet and serve it with your favorite cookie. In colder moons bake warm fruit crisps and cobblers with cinnamon and nutmeg.

Garlic and onion add the fire element to your cooking. Herbs like basil, fennel, and thyme energize the system and awaken taste buds. Spices such as ginger, turmeric, and curry act ads tonics and stimulate digestion. Make a spicy tea with slices of fresh ginger and a dab of local honey.





The Full Moon

The luminous round moon in all its fullest inspires lovers and poets, and, some say, the wild and crazy (hence the name “lunatic”). For those following the path of the Goddess however, it is a sacred time, full of energy and magic, worship and celebration. Foods at this phase of the Goddess in her Mother aspect- weighty, and at her full potential- should be rich, abundant, and celebratory. This is the perfect time for culinary alchemy, as magical energies are intoxicating and expansive. Gather herbs from your garden in the early light of dawn, and visualize your dream, knowing it will be. Trust in the Mother to honor your desires.


Kitchen Blessing for the Full Moon

Goddess, Mother, the end and the beginning,
The dusk and the dawn, we celebrate you!
Bless us tonight as we gather in love,
Watch over us with compassion,
And fill us with your grace.
Accept our thanksgiving as we lift up
Our hearts in Joy! Blessed be!



During the full moon, celebrate!

A roasted turkey, baked salmon, egg dishes, and bowls of steaming pasta topped with garlicky shrimp or roasted vegetables and pine nuts are all perfect choices to revel in the full moon’s energy. Choose foods for love that are sumptuous and seductive, and spices that are warm and sensuous.

Moon vegetables such as mushrooms, potatoes, cabbage, snowy cauliflower should be prepared with creamy sauces spiked with caraway, or tarragon, or paired with basil and juicy tomatoes, the fruit of love.

Herbs and spices should be lively and uplifting, including mints, thyme, basil, and oregano. Use lots of freshly cracked peppercorns to add passion or protective energies. Spices should be fiery, like chili peppers and garlic, or sweet and alluring, like cinnamon and vanilla.

For a full moon dessert, celebrate sensuality goddess-style: eat from plates brimming over with ripened fruits in season, assorted nuts and cheeses, sweet wine… and anything chocolate!





The Waning Moon

The waning moon brings a turn toward introspection, finalizing details and clearing out that which we have outgrown or no longer need. It is a time to garner wisdom in the quiet, a time to let go. As the Goddess in her Crone aspect, this phase of the moon teaches patience and the development of inner wisdom- paying attention to intuition.
In the kitchen, we are clearing out, paring down, and finishing up leftovers. Take time to contemplate letting go of what no longer nourishes you in your life. Rid the refrigerator of stale and moldy foods with clear intention. As you discard the old, focus your thoughts on visualizing those aspects in your life that need to be cast off.


[b]Kitchen Blessing for the Waning Moon[/b]

Cerridwen, Goddess of transformation,
Inspire us with your bittersweet beauty
To be fierce in our clarity.
Help is to discard that which no longer nourishes us,
Body and soul. Keep out hearth free of clutter and lingering bones of contention.
Help us to stir our ancient dreams into reality.
Teach us to trust our instincts and honor our intuition.
Bless our witch’s path as we dedicate our hone to the service of truth. Blessed Be!



During the waning moon, choice foods that cleanse the system and fortify protection.

Waning moon foods that help clear the body and cleanse accumulated energy include lemon and grapefruit, cabbage, celery, broccoli, cranberries, barley, parsley, sage, and bitter greens.

Take the time during this waning moon to tune in to what your body is craving, and contemplate why you have these cravings. Pay close attention to your body’s symptoms. Our bodies are a physical map of our unconsciousness, or unknown self.

Choose lighter proteins as the center of your meal such as tofu, light fish, or yogurt. Beans are astringent, and served with brown rise they provide the perfect protein at this time of retreat. Experiment with simple meals based around beans, rice, and pungent spices.

Broth-based soups full of simmering vegetables, and light pastas such as angel hair tossed in olive oil, lemon, and garlic make a good choice for entrees during the waning phase. For another appropriate light meal, try some balsamic roasted vegetables served on slices of toasted French bread and spread with fresh cheese, and a fresh salad of herbal greens. Think light and fresh, clear and uncomplicated.

Cleansing and purifying herbs such as cilantro and parsley may be added to soups and salads, and sprinkled on vegetables. Try cucumber salad with a yogurt-dill dressing. Naturally sweet desserts such as apples, strawberries, or chilled watermelon are all astringent and cleansing choices.

Herbal teas are especially useful during the waning moon. Sage tea, the perfect Crone’s tea, is antibiotic, and preventive as well as protective. Peppermint calms and soothes the tummy. Hot water with lemon helps cleanse the liver of excess energy. A tonic of warm water with a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and honey will boost your immune system and clear away impurities.




The New Moon

Also known as the dark moon, this three-day period brings us in touch with the depth of night and summons us to face the Dark Goddess energies. It is a powerful time of intention setting and soul searching. Many practitioners advise some form of fasting during the dark moon phase to aid in clearing the mind and body.
If you choose to fast, do so wisely and drink plenty of fluids, particularly supportive herb teas and freshly squeezed juices. As you begin eating again, choose simple nourishing foods to break your fast, such as yogurt with a piece of fruit. Savor each bite. You will feel as if your inner fire has been reset, and your body will welcome the coming waxing energy of the moon goddess with anticipation and delight. It’s a wonderful way to break old habits and unconsciousness eating patterns. Tune in to making food choices consciously. This honors your body and, in turn, the goddess within.


New Moon Kitchen Blessing

Hecate, Goddess of the dark moon crossroads,
Stay with us tonight. Be our silent witness,
Confirm our sorrow, loss and pain
With your unwavering strength and steady gaze.
Bless us with your hard won wisdom.
Guide us in new directions
As we let go of the past and embrace our future. Blessed Be!



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Brief Food Index
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Alura Noel
 
Posts: 449
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Re: Alura's Book of Shadows

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 18, 2013 6:01 pm

House Cleaning Recipes

francescas-room.jpg



Here's the link for the house cleaning recipes: http://everythingunderthemoon.net/forum/natural-cleaning-recipes-t24280.html

:fairy:
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Alura Noel
 
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 4:33 am
Location: Florida
Gender: Female

Alura's Book of Shadows: Herbal Actions and Definitions

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 18, 2013 8:24 pm

http://livingafield.com/Actions.htm

Herbal Actions and Definitions



Adaptogen:
Herbs that improve the body's ability to adapt to stress of any sort, including infection, mental stress, or fatigue.
Examples:
Astragalus membranaceus, Ginseng Panax quinquefolius, Valerian Valeriana officinalis



Alterative:
Herbs that restore the proper function of the body.
Examples:
Alfalfa Medicago sativa, Astragalus membranaceus, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Bayberry (Sweet gale, Wax-Myrtle) Myrica gale, Trillium (Birthroot) Trillium spp., Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Black Root Leptandra Virginica, Black Walnut Bark Juglans nigra, Blessed Thistle Cnicus benedictus, Blue Flag Iris versicolor, Boxwood Buxus spp., Burdock Arctium lappa, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Chickweed Stellaria media, Cleavers Galium aparine, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Curly Dock Rumex crispus, Devil's Claw Harpagophytum procumbens, Dandelion Root Taraxacum officinale, Dogwood Cornus spp., Echinacea purpurea, Elder Sambucus L., Eyebright Euphrasia L., Fringe Tree Chionanthus L., Fumitory Fumaria, Garlic Allium sativum, Ginseng Panax quinquefolius, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Gotu Kola Centella asiatica, Guaiac Guaiacum L., Holly llex, Ironweed Vernonia spp., Kelp, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Mandrake Mandragora L., Mallow Malva neglecta, Marshmallow Althaea officinalis, Mezereum Daphne mezereum, Milkweed Asclepias L., Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Oregon Grape Root Mahonia Nutt., Pilewort Ranunculus ficaria, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Plantain Plantago spp., Pokeweed Phytolacca americana, Prickly Ash Zanthoxylum L., Purple Loosestrife Lythrum salicaria, Raspberry Leaf Rubus idaeus, Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Rockrose Cistus L., Rhubarb Rheum rhabarbarum, Sarsaparilla Smilax aristolochiifolia, Sassafras Sassafras albidum, Soapwort Saponaria L., Speedwell Veronica L., Spikenard Nardostachys grandiflora, Black Spruce Picea mariana, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Twinleaf Jeffersonia diphylla, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Virginia Creeper Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Wafer Ash Ptelea trifoliata, Wahoo Euonymus atropurpurea, Walnut Juglans nigra, Wheatgrass Triticum aestivum, Willow Bark Salix spp., Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Wood Betony Stachys officinalis, Water Dock Rumex orbiculatus, Yarrow Achillea millefolium, Yellow Jessamine Gelsemium sempervirens, Yellow Parrila, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon spp., Yucca Root Yucca schidigera



Analgesic:
Herbs that relieve pain.
Examples:
Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Buttercup Ranunculus L., Chamomile Anthemis L., Catnip, Celandine, Clove, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Echinacea purpurea, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Goatsbeard Tragopogon L., Henbane Hyoscyamus niger, Hops Humulus lupulus , Jimson Weed Datura stramonium, Lemongrass Cymbopogon L., Meadowsweet Spiraea spp., Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Lady's Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Marijuana Cannabis sativa, Mint Mentha L., Monkshood Aconitum L., Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Nightshade, Noni Fruit, Opium Papaver somniferum, Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare, Pansy, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Pokeweed Phytolacca americana, Poplar, Prickly Ash Zanthoxylum L., Primrose, Saffron, Sassafras Sassafras albidum, Skullcap Scutellaria L., St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Turmeric Curcuma longa, , Willow Bark Salix spp., Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens, Woodruff Asperula L., Wood Sorrel Oxalis spp., and Valerian Valeriana officinalis



Anesthetic:
Herbs that cause a lack of feeling. Typically administered to numb area prior to a medical procedure.
Examples:
Sanguinaria canadensis


Anhydrotic:
Herbs that decrease sweating.
Examples:
Astragalus membranaceus


Anodyne:
Herbs that reduce pain by reducing the sensitivity of the nerves. Synonymous with ANALGESIC
Antacid:
Herbs that relieve excessive stomach acid.
Examples:
Comfrey Leaves or Root Symphytum officinale, Flax Seed, Dandelion Root Taraxacum officinale, Kelp, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Red Raspberry Rubus idaeus, Slippery Elm Ulmus americana, Wood Betony Stachys officinalis




Anthelmintic:
Destroy or expel worms from the digestive system.
Examples:
Garlic Allium sativum, Tansy Tanacetum L., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris


Antiabortive:
Herbs that help to inhibit abortive tendencies. The herbs will not prevent a miscarriage when the fetus is damaged or improperly secured.
Examples:
American Mistletoe Phoradendron leucarpum, Kelp, Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium, Ragwort Packera spp.




Antiarthritic:
Relieve gout or other arthritic conditions. Generally, ALTERATIVES
Examples:
Angelica, Arnica Arnica montana, Ashwagandha Withania somnifera, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Birch Betula spp., Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Camphor Tree Cinnamomum camphora, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Devil’s Claw Harpagophytum procumbens, Eucalyptus Eucalyptus globules, European Mistletoe Viscum album, Giloy Tinospora cordifolia, Guggul Commiphora mukul, Larch Larix decidua, Nirgundi Vitex negundo, Poke Phytolaca americana, Shallaki Boswellia serrata, Sonth Zingiber officinale, Spruce Picea spp., Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Turmeric Curcuma longa, Willow Bark Salix spp.


Antiasthmatic:
Herbs that relieve the symptoms of asthma. Some, like Lobelia, are strong Antispasmodics that dilate the bronchioles. Others, like Mullein Verbascum thapsus, and Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum help break up the mucus. Some herbs like Mullein may be smoked for quick relief, which may also be taken as tea.
Examples:
Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Lobelia, Mallow Malva neglecta, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Rooibos African Red Tea, Wild Cherry Bark Prunus virginiana, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum



Antibilious:
These herbs stimulate the flow of bile from the liver.
Examples:
Balmony, Fringetree, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis



Antibiotic:
Herbs that inhibit the growth of, or destroy, bacteria, viruses or amoebas. some herbs may directly kill the invader, while others work by stimulating the bodies own immune system response.
Examples:
Acacia, Aloe, Marijuana Cannabis sativa, Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Cryptolepsis, Echinacea purpurea, Eucalyptus, Garlic Allium sativum, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Grapefruit Seed Extract, Honey, Hops Humulus lupulus , Iceland Moss, Juniper Berries, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Myrrh, Olive Leaf, Plantain Plantago spp., Rosemary Oil, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Saint John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Sundew, Thyme, Usnea, Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris



Anticatarrhal:
Help remove excessive mucus, generally from the upper respiratory tract.
Examples:
Angelica, Anise, Bayberry (Sweet Gale, Wax-Myrtle) Myrica gale, Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Coltsfoot, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Cranesbill Geranium dissectum, Elder Sambucus L., Elecampane, Figs, Flax Seed, Garlic Allium sativum, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Ginkgo Biloba, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Hydrastis canadensis, Horseradish, Irish Moss, Lobelia, Lungwort, Mallow Malva neglecta, Marshmallow Althaea officinalis, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Plantain Plantago L., Raisins, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Wild Cherry Bark Prunus virginiana, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum



Anticoagulant:
Herbs that break up or prevent clots.
Examples:
Yellow Sweet Clover Melilotus officinalis, White Sweet Clover Melilotus albus


Anticonvulsant:
Herbs that help reduce or prevent seizures.
Examples:
Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Valerian Valeriana officinalis,



Antidepressant:
Herbs that raise the mood and counteract depression
Examples:
St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata.



Antidiabetic:
Herbs that help regulate and reduce blood sugar.
Examples:
Burdock Arctium annum, Garlic Allium sativum


Antidiarrheal:
Herbs that alleviate diarrhea.
Examples:
Agrimony Agrimonia eupatoria, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus, Blackberry Rubus fruticosus, Cinquefoil Potentilla erecta, Coffee Coffea Arabica, Dogwood Cornus florida, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Psyllium Seed Plantago afra, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Wild Strawberry Fragaria vesca, Uzara Xysmalobium undulatum



Antiemetic:
Herbs that reduce nausea and vomiting.
Examples:
Anise, Black Horehound, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Cloves, Colombo, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Iceland Moss, Lemonbalm, Lobelia, Peach Leaves, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Raspberry Rubus idaeus, Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Spearmint Mentha spicata, Sweet Basil


Antiepileptic:
Herbs that help reduce or prevent seizures.
Examples:
Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Valerian Valeriana officinalis,



Antifungals:
Herbs which help the body destroy or resist pathogenic organisms. Some actually kill the organisms while others support the function of the immune system to fight off the fungi.
Examples:
Cornflower Centaurea cyanus, Echinacea purpurea, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Mountain Laurel Kalmia latifolia, Myrrh, Garlic Allium sativum, Plantain Plantago spp., Thyme, Eucalyptus, White Cedar Thuja occidentalis, Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Sage Salvia officinalis



Antihemorrhagic:
Herbs which stop or prevent bleeding. Astringents are often haemostatic.
Examples:
Cranesbill, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Yarrow Achillea millefolium



Antihistamine:
Herbs that oppose the action of histamines.
Examples:
Kudzu Pueraria lobata, Canadian Goldenrod Solidago canadensis


Antihydropic:
Relieves "dropsy" or fluid retention.
Examples:
Bearberry, Couch Grass, Buchu, Corn Silk, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata



Antihydrotic:
Herbs that reduce or suppress perspiration.
Examples:Sage


Antihypertensive:
Herbs that reduce blood pressure.
Examples:
Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Garlic Allium sativum, Ramps Allium tricoccum, Yarrow Achillea millefolium



Antihypothyroid:
Herbs that stimulate thyroid action.
Examples:
Astragalus Astragalus membranaceus, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Kelp



Anti-Infective:
Herbs that combat infections.
Example:
Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Clematis Clematis recta, Colchicum Colchicum autumnale, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Jack-in-the-Pulpit Arisaema triphyllum, Kudzu Pueraria lobata, Lily-of-the-Valley Convallaria majalis, Mountain Laurel Kalmia latifolia, Oats Avena sativa, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Picture Plant Sarracenia purpurea, Plantain Plantago spp., Sandalwood Santalum album, Sassafras Sassafras albidum, Sorrel Rumex acetosa, Spruce Picea spp., St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Thyme Thymus vulgaris, Turmeric Curcuma domestica, Yarrow Achillea millefolium, Yellow Dock Rumex crispus




Anti-Inflammatory:
Herbs which help the body fight inflammation.
Examples: Mallow Malva neglecta, Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum,
Salicylates: Willow Bark Salix spp., Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens, Birch Betula spp., and Black Haw.
Steroidal: Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Wild Yam, and Ginseng Panax quinquefolius.
Unidentified: Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Bogbean, Devil’s Claw Harpagophytum procumbens, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Pot Marigold flowers Calendula officinalis, Turmeric Curcuma longa, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Wild Strawberry Fragaria vesca.



Antilithic:
Herbs that help prevent the formation of stones or gravel in the urine, and can help the remove of those which have already formed.
Examples:
Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Bean, Bearberry, Birch Betula spp., Briar Hip, Buchu, Cascara Sagrada Frangula alnus, Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Chervil, Corn Silk, Cucumber, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Devil’s Claw Harpagophytum procumbens, Dyer's Broom, Everlasting, Fraxinella, Goldenrod Solidago L., Gravel Root, Ground Ivy, Holly llex, Horsetail, Hydrangea Root, Juniper Berries, Knot Weed, Marshmallow Althaea officinalis, Meadowsweet Spiraea spp., Mouse Ear, Oregon Grape Root Mahonia Nutt., Parsley, Pimpernel, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Plum, Queen of the Meadow, Ragwort Packera spp., Common Groundsel, European, Restharrow, Seven Barks, Uva Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Water Eryngo, Woodruff Asperula L., Yellow Toadflax



Antimalarial:
Herbs that prevent or treat Malaria.
Examples:
Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Black Catnip Phyllanthus amarus, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Croton Seeds Croton tiglium, Fever Bark Alstonia constricta, Hwema Bark Corynanthe pachyceras, Marijuana Cannabis sativa, Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Neem Antelaea azadirachta, Quassia Picrasma excelsa, Quinine Cinchona pubescens, Simaruba Simaruba amara, Tree of Heaven Ailanthus altissima, Tulip Tree Liriodendron tulipifera, Wild Indigo Baptisia tinctoria



Antimicrobial:
Herbs that help the body destroy or resist pathogenic organisms. Some herbs actually kill the pathogens, while others aid the body in its immune system response.
Examples:
Blood Root Sanguinaria canadensis, Echinacea Echinacea purpurea, Eucalyptus, Garlic Allium sativum, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Myrrh, Plantain Plantago spp., Sage, St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Thyme, Turmeric Curcuma longa, White Cedar Thuja occidentalis, Wild Indigo Baptisia L.



Antimitotic:
Herbs that reduce or prevent spontaneous cellular mutations.
Examples:
Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Plantain Plantago L.


Antimutagenic:
Herbs that reduce spontaneous mutations within cells. There is evidence that this may help reduce the incidence of cancer.
Examples:
Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Plantain Plantago L.



Antineoplastic:
Herbs that inhibit the growth of tumors.
Examples:
American Ginseng Panax quinquefolius, Bitter Melon Momordica charantia, Cranberry Vaccinium macrocarpon, Kudzu Pueraria lobata, Pygeum Prunus africana, St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum




Antinociceptive:
Herbs that reduces sensitivity to painful stimuli.
Examples:
Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora.



Antioxidant:
Herbs that render free radicals harmless.
Examples:
Artichoke, Ashwagandha Withania somnifera, Astragalus membranaceus, Bacopa Bacopa monniera, Bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Ginkgo, Grape Seed Extract, Green tea Camellia sinensis, Hawthorne, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Olive Leaf, Rosemary, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Turmeric Curcuma longa,

Antiparasitic:
Herbs that Destroy or expel worms from the digestive system. See ANTHELMINTIC
Examples:
Garlic Allium sativum, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Tansy Tanacetum L., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris



Antipruritic:
Herbs that prevent or relieve itching.
Examples:
Butcher’s Broom Ruscus aculeatus, Evening Primrose Oenothera biennis, Kudzu Pueraria lobata, Scarlet Pimpernel Anagallis arvensis, Sweet Gale Myrica gale, Vervain Verbena officinalis, Wheat Triticum aestivum





Antipsoriatic:
Herbs that alleviate symptoms of Psoriasis.
Examples:
Bitter Mellon Momordica charantia, Black Nightshade Solanum nigrum, Burdock Arctium lappa, Hogweed Heracleum sphondylium, Kudzu Pueraria lobata, Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Sarsaparilla Smilax spp., Sunflower Helianthus annuus, Teazle Dipsacus spp.



Antipsychotic:
Herbs that help relieve the symptoms of Psychosis.
Examples:
Pygeum Prunus africana, St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum



Antipyretic:
Herbs that reduce fever. In general, herbalists do not like to reduce fever unless it also has some beneficial effect on the infection or inflammation causing the fever. They see fever as one of the body's ways of fighting infection, and try to use herbs that support the immune system and the other cleansing processes of the body.
Examples:
Alfalfa Medicago sativa, American Centaury, American Hellibore, Bird's Tongue, Birthwort, Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis, Boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum, Borage, Brooklime, Buck Bean, Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Camphor, Carline Thistle, Catnip, Chickweed Stellaria media, Cleavers, Colombo, Coral Root, Cranberries, Currant, Dogwood Cornus spp., Dulse, Elder Flowers, Ephedra (Mormon Tea, Ma Huang), European Centuary, Everlasting, Feverweed, Fraxinella, Fringe Tree Chionanthus L., Garlic Allium sativum, Gotu Kola Hedge Bindweed, Holly llex, Hops Humulus lupulus , Imperial Masterwort, Kelp, Lady's Mantle, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Lemons, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Limes, Magnolia, Monkshood Aconitum L., Olive, Oranges, Peruvian Bark,Poplar, Quassia, Rosemary, Skullcap Scutellaria L., Sumac, Sweet Flag, Willow Bark Salix spp., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris, Southernwood Artemisia abrotanum, Valerian Valeriana officinalis, Yellow Gentian, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum




Antiretroviral:
Herbs which are effective against retroviruses (RNA viruses such as HIV).
Examples:
Aloe, Astragalus membranaceus, Bromelain, Cats Claw, Frost Grape Vitis vulpina, Garlic, Licorice Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Magnolia Vine Berries, Multake, Prunella, Rooibos, Shitake, St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Turmeric Curcuma longa



Antirheumatic:
Herbs that alleviate the symptoms of Arthritis.
Examples:
Arnica Arnica montana, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Birch Betula spp., Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Camphor Tree Cinnamomum camphora, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Devil’s Claw Harpagophytum procumbens, Eucalyptus Eucalyptus globules, European Mistletoe Viscum album, Larch Larix decidua, Poke Phytolaca americana, Spruce Picea spp., Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Turmeric Curcuma longa, Willow Bark Salix spp.



Antiscorbutic:
Herbs rich in Vitamin C which prevent or cure scurvy, a disease caused by deficiency of this vitamin.
Examples:
Alfalfa Medicago sativa, Barberry Berberis vulgaris Berries, Black Berries, Black Currant, Burdock Root Arctium lappa, Blueberries, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Chickweed Stellaria media, Citrus Fruits, Cranberries, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Eyebright Euphrasia L., Fennel Seed, Fenugreek Trigonella L., Hibiscus, Hops Humulus lupulus , Horsetail, Juniper Berries, Kelp, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Poke Root, Rose Hips, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Wood Betony Stachys officinalis, Curly Dock Rumex crispus




Antiseptic:
Inhibit growth of bacteria, and prevent infection, putrefaction, cell decay, and pus formation.
Examples:
Agave, Anise oil, Astragalus, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Beth Root, Bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus, Trillium (Birthroot) Trillium spp., Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Black Walnut Bark Juglans nigra, Buchu, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Chamomile Anthemis L., Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Clove, Cubeb, Echinacea purpurea, Eucalyptus, Feverweed, Garlic Allium sativum, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Guaiac Guaiacum L., Heather, Hibiscus Flower, Juniper Berries, Iceland Moss, Lavender, Mustard, Myrrh, Nasturtium, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Olive Leaf, Onion, Oregon Grape Root Mahonia Nutt., Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Plantain Plantago spp., Rosehips, Rosemary, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Sandalwood, Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens, Sassafras Sassafras albidum, Sweet Gum, Thyme, Tormentil, Turmeric Curcuma longa, White Oak Bark, White Pond Lily, Willow Bark Salix spp., Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum



Antispasmodic:
Muscle relaxants. Herbs that help prevent or ease muscle spasms in both skeletal and smooth muscles. Herbs which have a tendency to act upon the respiratory system are useful for the treatment of asthma.
Examples:
Anise, Astragalus membranaceus, Balm, Basil, Bedstraw, Belladonna, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Black Haw, Blind Nettle, Blue Cohosh Caulophyllum thalictroides, Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Buttercup Ranunculus L., Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Cascara Sagrada Frangula alnus, Cayenne Pepper Capsicum annuum, Chamomile Anthemis L., Marijuana Cannabis sativa, Caraway, Catnip, Cayenne Capsicum annuum,, Celandine Chelidonium majus, Cinquefoil Potentilla L., Coriander, Corydalis, Cowslip, Cramp bark, Dill, Dog Poison, Siberian Ginseng Eleutherococcus senticosus, English Ivy, Fennel, Ferula, Garlic Allium sativum, Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Gum Plant, Hawthorne, Henbane Hyoscyamus niger, Hibiscus Flower, Hops Humulus lupulus , Indian Pipe, Jimson Weed Datura stramonium, Kava Kava, Lady’s Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Lavender, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Lettuce, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Lily of the Valley, Linden, Lobelia, Marjoram, Masterwort, Mint Mentha L., American Mistletoe Phoradendron leucarpum, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Mugwort, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Muskmallow, Stinging Nettle Leaf Urtica dioica, Nerve Root, Oat, Onion, Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare, Parsley, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Peony, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Pimpernel, Pluerisy Root, Prickly Ash Zanthoxylum L., Radish, Ragged Cup, Raspberry Rubus idaeus, Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Rosehips, Rosemary, Rue, Saffron, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Spearmint Leaf, Spring Beauty Claytonia virginica, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Skullcap Scutellaria L., Skunk Cabbage, Sundew, Thyme, Twinleaf Jeffersonia diphylla, Valerian Valeriana officinalis, Vervain Verbena officinalis, Wild Yam, Woodruff Asperula L., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris, Woundwort, Yarrow Achillea millefolium, Yellow Melilot, White Melilot, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum


Antithrombotic:
Herbs that help prevent the formation of blood clots.
Examples:
Garlic



Antitoxin:
Herbs that act against the effects of specific toxins.
Examples:
Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Angelica, Plantain Plantago spp.



Antitussive:
Herbs that reduce or prevent cough.
Examples:
Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara, Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Wild Cherry Prunus serotina



Antiviral:
Herbs that kill viruses or render them unable to replicate.
Examples:
Astragalus membranaceus, Echinacea purpurea, Garlic Allium sativum, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Myrrh, Plantain Plantago spp., Sage, St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Thyme, Eucalyptus, Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Yarrow Achillea millefolium
Anxiolytic:
Also called anti-anxiety or anti-panic. Herbs that are used for the treatment of anxiety, and its related psychological and physical symptoms. Anxiolytics have been shown to be useful in the treatment of anxiety disorders.
Examples:
Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Valerian Valeriana officinalis



Aperient:
A mild and gentle laxative which promotes natural bowel movement and function.
Examples:
Agar-Agar, Asparagus, Boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum, Borage, Burdock Arctium lappa, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Cucumber, Curly Dock Rumex crispus. Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Dyer's Broom, Elder Sambucus L., Fig, Flax Seed, Fringe Tree Chionanthus L., Guar Gum, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Olive Oil, Plum, Prunes, Psyllium, Raisins, Restharrow, Rhubarb root Rheum rhabarbarum, Rose, Rose Hips, Senna, Spiderwort Tradescantia spp., Turtlebloom, Wild Strawberry Fragaria vesca, Witch Grass




Aphrodisiac:
Herbs that increase sexual potency or excitement.
Example:
Artichoke, Astragalus membranaceus, Burdock Arctium lappa, Carline Thistle, Celery, Clove, Coriander, Damiana, European Vervain Verbena officinalis, False Unicorn, Fennel, Fenugreek Trigonella L., Galangal, Ginseng Panax quinquefolius, Jasmine, Jimson Weed Datura stramonium, Kava Kava, Lettuce, Lovage, Maca Root, Matico, Mint Mentha L., Onion, Plantain Plantago spp., Pride of China, Queen of the Meadow, Saffron, Sarsasparilla Root, Savory, Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens, Stinging Nettle Root Urtica dioica, Sundew, Walnut Juglans nigra, Water Eryngo, Yarrow Achillea millefolium



Aromatic:
Herbs with a strong aroma that stimulates the digestive system.
Examples:
Allspice, Angelica, Anise Seed, Balm, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Buchu, Chamomile Anthemis L., Caraway, Cardamon, Catnip, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Cloves, Coriander, Cubeb, Dill, Fennel, Galangal, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Goldenrod Solidago L., Hops Humulus lupulus , Juniper, Khus-Khus, Lavender, Marjoram, Matico, Monarda, Nutmeg, Orris Root, Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Rosemary, Rue, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Sassafras Sassafras albidum, Savory, Star Anise, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Sweet Cicely, Sweet Flag, Wax Myrtle, Wild Hyssop, Wood Betony Stachys officinalis, Woodruff Asperula L., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris



Astringent:
Herbs that have a binding action on skin or mucous membranes that helps dry up mucous discharge, tone local blood vessels and varicosities, and stop bleeding. Astringents can be used to treat diarrhea, bleeding, mucous discharges, and the discomfort of varicosities and hemorrhoids.
Examples:
Agrimony Agrimonia L., Aloe Vera, Alpine Cranberry Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. spp., Amaranth Amaranthus L., Virginia Creeper Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Apple Fiber, Bearberry Uva Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Bears Garlic Allium sativum, Beechdrops, Beet Root, Bennet Geum urbanum, Betony Stachys officinalis, Bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus, Birch Betula spp., Trillium (Birthroot) Trillium spp., Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Black Alder Alnus glutinosa, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Cinquefoil Potentilla L., Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Cranesbill Geranium dissectum, Dandelion Root Taraxacum officinale, Dogwood Cornus spp., Elm Ulmus americana, Evening Primrose Oenothera L., Eyebright Euphrasia L., Fenugreek Trigonella L., Goldenrod Solidago L., Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Great Burnet, Ground Ivy, Hawthorn Berry, Hemlock Spruce, Hemp Nettle, Henna, Herb Robert, Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis), Holly llex, Horse Chestnut, Horseweed, Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Houseleek, Hyssop, Kidney Vetch, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Lady's Mantle, Laurel, Lemon, Lettuce, Loosestrife Lythrum spp., Lungwort, Madder, Magnolia, Mallow Malva neglecta, Marsh Tea, Matico, Meadowsweet Spiraea spp., Milfoil, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Mountain Laurel, Mouse Ear, Mullein Leaf, Myrrh, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, New Jersey Tea, Oak bark, Olive Leaf, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Periwinkle, Peruvian Bark, Pilewort Ranunculus ficaria, Pimpernel, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Pitcher Plant, Plantain Plantago spp., Plum, Pomegranite, Pride of China, Privet, Queen of the Meadow, Radish, Raspberry Leaf Rubus idaeus, Red Eyebright Euphrasia L., Rhatany, Rhubarb Rheum rhabarbarum, Rockrose Cistus L., Rose, Rosehips, Rosemary, Rowan, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Sandalwood, Sanicle, Savory, Senna (Purging Cassia), Shinleaf, Soloman's Seal, Sorrel, Spotted Cranesbill Geranium dissectum, Squaw Vine Mitchella repens, Sticklewort, Storksbill, Sumac, Sweet Fern, Sweet Gum, Sycamore Maple, Tormentil, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Vervain Verbena officinalis, Walnut Juglans nigra, Water Avens, Water Dock Rumex orbiculatus, Wax Myrtle, White Pond Lily, Wild Cherry Bark Prunus virginiana, Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Wild Strawberry Fragaria vesca, Willow Bark Salix spp., Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens, Witch Hazel, Woundwort, Yarrow Achillea millefolium, Yellow Dock Rumex crispus, Yellow Toadflax, Yucca Root




Bactericidal:
Herbs that kill bacteria.
Examples:
Echinacea purpurea, Eucalyptus, Garlic Allium sativum, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Myrrh, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Sage, Thyme, Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Yarrow Achillea millefolium




Bitter:
Herbs which, because of their bitter taste, stimulate the release of digestive hormones. This in turn stimulates appetite.
Examples:
Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Gentian, Mallow Malva neglecta, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Rue, Spiderwort Tradescantia spp., Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris,




Carminative:
Herbs that help the stomach and intestinal walls relax to aid in expelling gas.
Examples:
Allspice, Angelica, Anise, Astragalus membranaceus, Balm, Basil, Betony Stachys officinalis, Bergamot Monarda citriodora, Brier Hip, Buchu, Caraway, Cardamom, Carline Thistle, Carrot, Catnip, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Celery, Chamomile Anthemis L., Chickweed Stellaria media, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Cloves, Coriander, Cubeb, Dill, Fennel, Ferula, Feverfew, Garlic Allium sativum, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Goldenrod Solidago L., Hyssop, Juniper, Laurel, Lavender, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Lemongrass Cymbopogon L., Lovage, Marjoram, Masterwort, Milfoil, Monarda, Myrrh, Nutmeg, Onion, Orange, Parsley, Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Pimpernel, Pleurisy Root, Rue, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Sarsaparilla Smilax aristolochiifolia, Savory, Star Anise, Sweet Cicely, Sweet Flag, Thyme, Valerian Valeriana officinalis, Wild Ginger Zingiber officinale, Wild Cherry Bark Prunus virginiana, Wild Hyssop, Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens, Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum




Cathartic:
Herbs that clean waste material from the whole digestive system, including bowels, liver, and gall bladder.
Example:
Aloes, Asarum, Bird's Tongue, Black Root Leptandra Virginica, Blue Flag Iris versicolor, Boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum, Buck Bean, Castor Bean, Dogbane, Elder Sambucus L., Hellebore, Holly llex, Jalap, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Mandrake Mandragora L., Mezereum Daphne mezereum, Mulberry, Pokeweed Phytolacca americana, Scotch Broom, Senega Snakeroot, Senna, Stillingia, Walnut(Butternut), Wild Jalap, Yellow Toadflax




Cholagogue:
Herbs that stimulate the flow of bile from the liver.
Examples:
Aloe Vera, Artichokes, Astragalus Astragalus membranaceus, Balmony, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Black Root Leptandra Virginica, Blue or American Gentian, Burdock Arctium lappa, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Cat's Foot, Chicory, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Elder Sambucus L., Elecampane, European Centaury, Fern, Fumitory Fumaria, Fringed Gentian, Fringetree, Garlic Allium sativum, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Heather, Hedge Bindweed, Hemp Agrimony Agrimonia L., Lavender, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Linden, Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Mint Mentha L., Mouse Ear, Mugwort, Olive, Radish, Red Pimpernel, Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Rosemary, Senna, Soapwort Saponaria L., Stiff Gentian or Gallweed, Turtlebloom, Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris, Yarrow Achillea millefolium, Yellow Dock Rumex crispus, Yellow Gentian, Yerba mate




Cicatrisant:
Herbs that aid wound healing. See VULNERARY.



Contraceptive:
Herbs that act as a contraceptive
Examples:
Spring Beauty Claytonia virginica




Demulcent:
Herbs with a soothing effect on inflamed or irritated tissue.
Examples:
Acacia, Almond, Althea, Barley, Apple Fiber, Burdock Arctium lappa, Chickweed Stellaria media, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Colombo, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Dulse, Elm Ulmus americana, Fenugreek Trigonella L., Fig Tree, Flax, Ginseng (Panax schin-seng), Great Burnet, Gum Plant, Hibiscus (Hibiscus esculentus), Hollyhock, Iceland Moss, Indian Corn, Irish Moss, Kelp, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Lungwort, Mallow Malva neglecta, Marshmallow Root, Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Oat Straw, Olive, Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare, Pansy, Plantain Plantago spp., Slippery Elm Bark, Spiderwort Tradescantia spp., White Pond Lily, Witch Grass




Deobstruent:
These herbs will remove obstructions from the alimentary canal and other areas.
Examples:
Barberry Berberis vulgaris (liver), Culver's Root (bowel), Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis (glands), Gravel Root (kidneys), Hydrangea Root (kidneys), Plantain PlantagoL. (blood, kidneys), Yarrow Achillea millefolium (blood, kidneys)




Depurative:
A term synonymous with ALTERATIVE. Top




Desiccant:
Herbs that will dry surfaces by absorbing moisture.
Examples:
Agar Agar, Bladderwrack Powder, Corn Starch, Marshmallow Powder, Slippery Elm Powder




Detoxicant:
Herbs that support the liver in removing toxic substances from the body. These are different than antitoxins in that they help the liver eliminate any toxin, while antitoxins are for specific toxins. See HEPATIC




Diaphoretic:
Herbs that promote sweating. Sweating helps to remove waste products from the body. A fever without sweating can quickly overheat the body, and cause problems.
Examples:
Burdock Arctium lappa, Bergamot Monarda citriodora, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Chamomile Anthemis L., Ginger Zingiber officinale, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Rosemary, and Spearmint Leaf




Stimulating: Angelica, Blessed Thistle Cnicus benedictus, Boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum, Buchu, Elder Flowers, Ephedra, Garlic Allium sativum, Horseradish, Hyssop, Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Sage Salvia oficinalis, Spearmint Mentha spicata, Yarrow Achillea millefolium

Neutral: Horehound, Safflower, Sarsaparilla Smilax aristolochiifolia, Sassafras Sassafras albidum.

Relaxing: Burdock Arctium lappa, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Catnip, Chamomile Anthemis L., Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Mugwort, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Pleurisy Root, Thyme, Vervain Verbena officinalis, Willow Bark Salix spp., Wild Yam





Discutient:
Herbs which act by dissolving abnormal growths and tumors.
Examples:
Black Walnut Bark Juglans nigra, Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis, Burdock Root Arctium lappa, Cabbage Leaf, Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Devil’s Claw Harpagophytum procumbens, Garlic Allium sativum, Sanicle, Red Clover




Diuretic:
Herbs that increase the formation and flow of urine. They are used to treat water retention, obesity, lymphatic swellings, nerve inflammations such as lumbago and sciatica, infections of the urinary tract, skin eruptions, and kidney stones. Whenever a Diuretic is given, a lesser amount of Demulcent herb is also given to buffer the effect of the diuretic on the kidneys (especially when the Diuretic contains irritating properties) and to protect the tissues from the movement of kidney stones.
Examples:
Bearberry, Bergamot Monarda citriodora, Couch Grass, Cranberry, Buchu, Corn Silk, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Goldenrod Solidago canadensis, Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum, Spiderwort Tradescantia spp., Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Wild Strawberry Fragaria vesca, Yarrow Achillea millefolium




Emetic:
Herbs that cause vomiting. They have been used in the past in conditions characterized by a great deal of mucus, to clear the mucus from the body. In modern herbalism, they are used to cause forceful emptying in cases of poisoning.
Examples:
Adder's Tongue, Agrimony Agrimonia L., American Hellebore, American Mistletoe Phoradendron leucarpum, Asarum, Black Alder Alnus glutinosa, Red Alder, Smooth Alder, Black Root Leptandra Virginica, Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis, Blue Vervain Verbena officinalis, Boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum, Carline Thistle, Dogbane, Dog Poison, Dog's Mercury, Elder Sambucus L., European Centaury, Garden Violet, Hellebore, Hemp, Holly llex, Ipecacuanha Cephaelis ipecacuanha, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Lobelia, Mezereum Daphne mezereum, Milkweed Asclepias L., Nightshade, Peyote, Pilewort Ranunculus ficaria, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Pride of China, Rockrose Cistus L., Scotch Broom, Senega Snakeroot, Skunk Cabbage, Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum, Spurge (Cypress, Flowering, Garden, Milk-Purselane, Petty), St Benedict Thistle, Stillingia, Twinleaf Jeffersonia diphylla, Water Eryngo, Wild Indigo Baptisia L., Wild Yam




Emmenagogue:
Herbs that stimulate or normalize menstrual flow. They are sometimes referred to as Uterine Tonics.
Examples:
Examples of strong Emmenagogues: Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Juniper Berries, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium
Herbs with some Emmenagogue properties include: American Centaury, Angelica, Balm, Aloe Vera, Bergamot Monarda citriodora, Birthwort, Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis, Blue Cohosh Caulophyllum thalictroides, Brooklime, Caraway, Chamomile Anthemis L., Chicory,. Trillium (Birthroot) Trillium spp., Cotton, Ergot, European Vervain Verbena officinalis, False Unicorn Root Chamaelirium luteum, Flax, Fraxinella, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Hellebore, Hibiscus Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Hyssop, Imperial Masterwort, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Lovage, Madder, Stinging Nettle Leaf Urtica dioica, Parsley, Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Pride of China, Ragwort Packera spp., Rosemary, Rue, Saffron, Squaw Vine Mitchella repens, Sumac, Sweet Flag, Tansy Tanacetum L., Tarragon, Thuja, Wood Sorrel Oxalis spp., Yarrow Achillea millefolium




Emollient:
Herbs that have a soothing or healing effect on the skin. Similar to Demulcents, but they act only upon the skin, where demulcents effect all mucus membranes.
Examples:
Aloe Vera, Chickweed Stellaria media, Fenugreek Trigonella L., Flax seed, Kelp, Mallow Malva neglecta, Marshmallow Root, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Plantain Plantago spp., Pot Marigold Calendula officinalis, Slippery Elm Bark





Estrogenic:
Herbs that normalize the balance of estrogens in the body. Often supply compounds the body can make into estrogens if more are needed. These herbs are often used to ease the symptoms of menopause.
Examples:
Angelica, Dong Quai Angelica sinensis, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Wild Yam




Expectorant:
Herbs that help the body to remove excess mucous from the lungs.
Examples:
Coltsfoot, Eyebright Euphrasia L., Fenugreek Trigonella L., Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Hyssop, Lemongrass Cymbopogon L., Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Mallow Malva neglecta, Marshmallow Althaea officinalis, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Stinging Nettle Leaf Urtica dioica, Plantain Plantago spp., Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Slippery Elm Bark, Wild Cherry Bark Prunus virginiana, Yucca Root Yucca schidigera, and Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum




Febrifuge:
Herbs that reduce fever.
Note: Herbalists understand that a fever is the body’s way of fighting off an infection. As long as the body is able to eliminate waste, they do not typically use herbs to reduce fever. They may also lower a fever when it has some beneficial effect on the infection or inflammation causing the fever. They will also lower fever if for some reason the body’s ability to eliminate waste has been compromised. They will first attempt to repair the waste eliminating system that is not functioning properly, and try to use herbs that support the immune system and the other cleansing processes of the body.
Examples:
Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Meadowsweet Spiraea spp., Willow Bark Salix spp., Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens



Fungicide:
Herbs that kill fungus. See ANTI-MICROBIAL.



Galactagogue:
Herbs that increase lactation. Generally need to be used in the context of a very good diet and general health to be effective.
Examples:
Anise Seed, Basil, Borage, Caraway, Cleavers Galium aparine, Cumin, Dandelion Root Taraxacum officinale, Dill, European Vervain Verbena officinalis, Fennel, Fenugreek Trigonella L., Goat's Rue, Iceland Moss, Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Milkwort, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica




Haemostatic:
Herbs which stop or prevent bleeding. ASTRINGENTS are often HAEMOSTATIC.
Examples:
Bayberry (Sweet Gale, Wax-Myrtle) Myrica gale ( Uterus), Beth Root (General), Black Alder Alnus glutinosa, Blackberry (Uterus), Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa (Lungs), Cayenne (Powerful), Club Moss, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Cranesbill Geranium dissectum, Ergot, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis (Uterus, bowels), Great Burnett, Horsetail, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Mullein (Bowels, general), Stinging Nettle Root Urtica dioica (General), Plantain Plantago spp., Raspberry Leaf Rubus idaeus, Red Alder, Shave Grass, Smooth Alder, Storksbill (Uterus), Tormentil, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, White Oak Bark (General), Witch Hazel, Yarrow Achillea millefolium




Hepatic:
Herbs that support the function of the liver.
Examples:
Agrimony Agrimonia L., Aloe Vera, Asparagus, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Bayberry (Sweet Gale, Wax-Myrtle) Myrica gale, Blue Flag Iris versicolor, Boldo, Buckthorn, Carrot, Cascara Sagrada Frangula alnus, Curly Dock Rumex crispus, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Fennel, Garden Sage Salvia oficinalis, Hyssop, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Mandrake Mandragora L., Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Poke Root, Self-Heal, Wild Yam, Wood Betony Stachys officinalis




Hypnotic:
Herbs that help induce sleep or a hypnotic state.
Examples:
Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Hops Humulus lupulus , Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Skullcap Scutellaria L., Valerian Valeriana officinalis



Hypoglycemic:
Herbs that help regulate and reduce blood sugar.
Examples:
Burdock Arctium lappa, Garlic





Hypotensive:
See ANTIHYPERTENSIVE.




Immunostimulant:
Herbs that stimulate the immune system.
Examples:
Astragalus membranaceus, Burdock Arctium lappa, Echinacea purpurea, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, White Cedar Thuja occidentalis, Yarrow Achillea millefolium



Laxative:
Herbs that promote contractions of the bowels to stimulate removal of feces. Unlike the gentler APERIENTS which promote normal bowel activity, herbs with a Laxative effect act by irritating the bowels so they evacuate more forcefully.
Examples:
Agave, Aloe Vera, Apple tree bark, Asparagus, Black Walnut Bark Juglans nigra, Cascara, Chickweed Stellaria media, Dog's Mercury, Ferula Ferula foetida, Fig tree, Fumitory Fumaria, Garden Violet, Larch, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Lily of the Valley, Mexican Damiana, Olive, Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare, Pansy, Peach tree, Plum Prunus domestica Prunus americana, Pokeweed Phytolacca americana, Raspberry Rubus idaeus, Senna, Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum, Sorrel, Tamarind, Wahoo*, Walnut Juglans cinerea, Wild Oregon Grape Root Mahonia Nutt., Yellow Parilla, Yerba Mate, Yucca Root




Lithotriptic:
Herbs that help to dissolve and eliminate urinary and biliary stones and gravel.
Examples:
For kidney and bladder stones: Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Goldenrod Solidago canadensis, Nettle Leaf Urtica dioica, Parsley, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi

For the gallbladder: Cascara Sagrada Frangula alnus, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, Wild Cherry Bark Prunus virginiana





Lymphatic:
Herbs that will stimulate and cleanse the lymphatic system.
Examples:
Astragalus membranaceus, Black Walnut Bark Juglans nigra, Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Dock Rumex crispus, Echinacea purpurea, Garlic Allium sativum, Oregon Grape Root Mahonia Nutt., Poke





Lypolytic:
Herbs that normalize lipids in the body.
Examples:
Dong Quai Angelica sinensis, Garlic




Narcotic:
Powerful ANALGESICS which often also have HYPNOTIC function.
Example:
Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Opium Poppy Papaver somniferum




Nervine:
Herbs that exert an effect on the nervous system. See the categories below.
Examples:
Nervine Relaxant: Herbs that promote relaxation of the nervous system. Often act to sedate or produce sleep, or to relax muscles. Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Catnip, Chamomile Anthemis L., Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Hyssop, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Linden blossom, Musk-mallow Malva moschata, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Black Haw, Cramp Bark, Lady's Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Hops Humulus lupulus , California Poppy, Lavender, Pleurisy Root, Skullcap Scutellaria L., St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Valerian Valeriana officinalis
Nervine Stimulant: Herbs that stimulate the nervous system. Astragalus membranaceus, Coffee, Tea, Mate, Kola Nut
Nervine Tonic: Herbs that support and strengthen the nervous system. Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Oats, Skullcap Scutellaria L., St John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Vervain Verbena officinalis





Nutritive:
Herbs that nourish the body. Useful in convalescence or anorexia.
Examples:
Marshmallow Althaea officinalis, Hemp seeds




Oxytocic:
These herbs will promote and can assist in easier childbirth. See Uterine Tonic
Examples:
Birthwort, Blue Cohosh Caulophyllum thalictroides, Marijuana Cannabis sativa, Cotton, Ergot, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Peruvian Bark, Shepherd's Purse Capsella bursa-pastoris




Parasiticide:
Herbs that destroy parasites in the digestive tract or on the skin.
Examples:
Blackberry, Black Walnut Bark Juglans nigra, Chamomile Anthemis L., Cinnamon Oil, Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Cloves, Echinacea Echinacea purpurea, False Unicorn, Garlic Allium sativum, Gentian, Nettle Leaf Urtica dioica, Rue, Thyme, Wood Betony Stachys officinalis, Wormwood Artemisia vulgaris




Parturient:
Herbs that support and facilitate the birthing process. These are often Uterine Tonics or stimulants. See Oxytocic
Examples:
Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Blue Cohosh Caulophyllum thalictroides, Chaste Berry, False Unicorn Root Chamaelirium luteum, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Raspberry Leaf Rubus idaeus, Squaw Vine Mitchella repens




Pectoral:
Herbs that strengthen the lungs. All expectorants are pectorals, but this class includes herbs that aid the lungs through other actions as well.
Examples:
Bloodroot Sanguinaria Canadensis, Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Elecampagne, Lobelia, Mallow Malva neglecta, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Pleurisy Root, Uva-Ursi Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi




Relaxant:
Herbs which induce relaxation. See Nervine
Examples:
Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Catnip, Chamomile Anthemis L., Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Hyssop, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Linden blossom, Musk-mallow Malva moschata, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Black Haw, Cramp Bark, Lady's Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Hops Humulus lupulus , California Poppy, Lavender, Pleurisy Root, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Valerian Valeriana officinalis




Restorative:
See ALTERATIVE




Rubefacient:
Herbs that increase the flow of blood at the surface of the skin and produce redness where they are applied. Their function is to draw inflammation and congestion from deeper areas. They are useful for the treatment of arthritis, rheumatism, and other joint problems and for sprains.
Examples:
Bergamot Monarda citriodora, Buttercup Ranunculus L., Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Cinnamon Cinnamomum spp., Cowslip, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Hellebore, Horseradish, Juniper, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Mezereum Daphne mezereum, Monarda, Mustard Seed, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Olive Leaf, Pasque Flower, Peppermint Oil, Prickly Ash Zanthoxylum L., Rosemary Oil, Rue, Thyme Oil, Wheatgrass Triticum aestivum, Powder



Sedative:
Herbs that strongly quiet the nervous system. These will include antispasmodic and nervine.

Examples:
Birch Betula lenta, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Black Haw, Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis, Bugleweed (arterial, nervine), Catnip, Celery seeds, Chamomile Anthemis L., Coral Root, Ferula Ferula foetida, Feverweed, Garden Sage Salvia oficinalis, Goldthread, Hawthorn, Hops Humulus lupulus , Hyssop, Indian Pipe (Ghost Pipe) Monotropa uniflora, Lavender, Lady’s Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Lettuce, Monkshood Aconitum L., Mountain Laurel, New Jersey Tea, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Peach Tree, Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium, Peony, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Periwinkle Vinca minor, Red Clover Trifolium pratense, Saffron, Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens, Skullcap Scutellaria L., Sorrel, Spearmint Mentha spicata, St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Sweet Flag, Thyme, Valerian Valeriana officinalis, Wild Black Cherry, Witch Hazel, Wood Betony Stachys officinalis, Yellow Jessamine Gelsemium sempervirens





Sialagogue:
Substances that stimulate the flow of saliva and thus aid in the digestion of starches.
Examples:
Beet Root, Betel Nut Piper betle, Black Pepper, Blue Flag Iris versicolor, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Currant Ribes rubrum, Echinacea purpurea, European Centaury, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Lemon, Licorice Root Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Moneywort Lysimachia nummularia, Prickly Ash Zanthoxylum L., Quassia Picrasma excelsa Rooibos African Red Tea, Senega Snakeroot, Seven Barks (Hydrangea), Water Eryngo, Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum)



Soporific:
Herbs that will assist in giving a restful and relaxing sleep.
Examples:
Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Catnip, Hops Humulus lupulus , Lady’s Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Mullein Verbascum thapsus, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata, Skullcap Scutellaria L., Valerian Valeriana officinalis, Vervain Verbena officinalis




Spasmolytic:
See ANTISPASMODIC




Stimulant:
Generally, herbs that cause an increase in body functions. In older herbals, this term refers specifically to stimulants of the circulatory system;
Examples:
Bayberry (Sweet Gale, Wax-Myrtle) Myrica gale, Bergamot Monarda citriodora, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, .Prickly Ash Zanthoxylum L., Yarrow Achillea millefolium. See Cardiac.



Stomachic:
Herbs that tone and stimulate action of the stomach. See BITTER




Styptic:
Herbs that will stop bleeding, both internal and external.
Examples:
Astragalus membranaceus, Bennet Geum urbanum, Beth Root, Bistort Persicaria bistorta, Blackberry, Blind Nettle, Cranesbill Geranium dissectum, Horsetail, Horseweed, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Loosestrife Lythrum spp., Matico, Plantain Plantago spp., Rhatany, Sanicle Sanicula europaea, Shepherd's Purse Capsella bursa-pastoris, Spotted Cranebill, Tormentil, White Oak Bark, Witch Hazel, Woundwort, Yarrow Achillea millefolium





Thymoleptic:
Herbs that act upon neurotransmitters in the brain to raise the mood and counteract depression.
Examples:
St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum, Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata




Tonic:
Herbs that strengthen and support the function of a specific organ or, in some herbals, the whole body.
Examples:
Alfalfa Medicago sativa, Apple Fiber, Burdock Arctium lappa, Cayenne Capsicum annuum, Dandelion Root Taraxacum officinale, Eyebright Euphrasia L., Fenugreek Trigonella L., Ginseng Panax L., Hawthorn Berry, Hops Humulus lupulus , Milk Thistle Silybum marianum, Plantain Plantago spp., Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Yerba Mate

Specific Tonics

-Blood: Chaparral Larrea tridentata, Chokecherry Prunus virginiana, Echinacea Echinacea purpurea, Garlic, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica

-Cardiac: Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Bugleweed, Foxglove Digitalis purpurea, Hawthorne, Ginseng Panax L., Hawthorn, Hedge Hyssop, Hellebore, Lily of the Valley, Lime blossom, American Mistletoe Phoradendron leucarpum, Monarda, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Peyote, Raspberry Rubus idaeus, Wahoo

-Gall Bladder: Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Oregon Grape Root Mahonia Nutt., Parsley, Wild Yam

-Intestinal: Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Blackberry Leaves, Cascara Sagrada Frangula alnus, Cranesbill Geranium dissectum, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis

-Kidney: American Mistletoe Phoradendron leucarpum, Buchu, Bunchberry Cornus canadensis, Burdock Root Arctium lappa, Cleavers, Fo-ti, Horsetail, Kava Kava, Parsley, Pipsissewa Chimaphila umbellata, Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens, Uva Ursi.

-Liver: Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Buckthorn Bark, Cascara Sagrada Frangula alnus, Dandelion Taraxacum officinale, Eyebright Euphrasia L., Fo-ti, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Mandrake Mandragora L., Stoneroot.

-Lung: Beth Root, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Elecampane, Fenugreek Trigonella L., Garlic Allium sativum, Lungwort, Pluerisy Root

-Nerve: American Mistletoe Phoradendron leucarpum, Celery, Chamomile Anthemis L., Ghost Pipe Monotropa uniflora, Hops Humulus lupulus , Lady’s Slipper Cypripedium acaule, Lobelia, St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Valerian Valeriana officinalis

-Sexual: (1) Female - Black Haw, Damiana, Dong Quai Angelica sinensis, False Unicorn, Squaw Vine Mitchella repens

(2) Male - Damiana, Ginseng Panax L., Plantain Plantago spp., Sarsaparilla Smilax aristolochiifolia, Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens, Stinging Nettle Urtica dioica, Yarrow Achillea millefolium

-Uterine Tone and normalize the function of the female reproductive system. Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Blue Cohosh Caulophyllum thalictroides, Chaste Berry, Dong Quai Angelica sinensis, False Unicorn Root Chamaelirium luteum, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, Raspberry Leaf Rubus idaeus, Shepherd's Purse Capsella bursa-pastoris, Squaw Vine Mitchella repens






Vasoconstrictor:
Herbs which reduce blood flow.
Examples:
Ma Huang Ephedra sinica, Witch Hazel Hamamelis virginiana, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Bugleweed Lycopus virginicus





Vasodilator:
Herbs which Increase blood flow.
Examples:
American Hellebore Veratrum viride, Garlic Allium sativum, Ginseng Panax L., Horseradish Amoracia rusticana, Barberry Berberis vulgaris, Black Cohosh Actaea racemosa, Black Haw Viburnum spp., Coleus forskholii Coleus, Cramp Bark, Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Ginkgo Biloba, Ginseng Panax L., Goldenthread Coptis spp., Hawthorn Crataegus spp., Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis, Linden Flower Tilia europaea, Olive Leaf Olea europaea, Parsley Petroselinum crispum, Prickly Ash Xanthoxylum americanum, Skullcap Scutellaria L., Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica, Valerian Valeriana officinalis, Vervain Verbena officinalis, Yarrow Achillea millefolium,





Vermicide:
Herbs that kill intestinal worms. See ANTHELMINTIC




Vermifuge:
Herbs that promote expulsion of intestinal worms. See ANTHELMINTIC





Vulnerary:
Herbs that help wounds or inflammations to heal; can refer to lesions of the skin or mucus membranes. Many ASTRINGENTS, DEMULCENTS, and EMOLLIENTS have vulnerary actions. Sometimes the vulnerary function is due to tannins producing an impervious layer that protects the wound as it heals. Sometimes mucilage soothes and keeps the tissue moist. Certain plants like Comfrey and Plantain contain Allantoin which is a natural cell proliferant. Allantoin stimulates cell growth, and helps the body quickly regenerate cells to speed healing. Comfrey contains hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA's). These have been shown to increase the incidents of liver failure. Rats given injections of pure PA's developed cancer. It is therefore not recommended that you take comfrey internally. Herbs with ANTI-MICROBIAL action can also assist wound healing by guarding against infection.
Examples:
Burdock Arctium lappa, Comfrey Symphytum officinale, Chickweed Stellaria media, Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis, Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale, Knotweed Polygonum aviculare, Marigold, Marshmallow Althaea officinalis, Plantain Plantago spp., Solomon's Seal Polygonatum biflorum, St John's Wort Hypericum perforatum, Yarrow Achillea millefolium, Willow Bark Salix spp.


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Alura's Book of Shadows; Plant Diagrams

Postby Alura Noel » Tue Jun 18, 2013 8:45 pm

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Alura's Book of Shadows: Essential Oil Uses

Postby Alura Noel » Wed Jun 19, 2013 1:19 am

More Info on Essential Oil Uses
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Alura's Book of Shadows: Essential Oil Uses

Postby Alura Noel » Wed Jun 19, 2013 1:21 am

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Alura's Book of Shadows: Essential Oil Uses

Postby Alura Noel » Wed Jun 19, 2013 1:21 am

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Alura's Book of Shadows: Tarot- What and How

Postby Alura Noel » Wed Jun 19, 2013 5:25 pm

http://www.weirdshitnotbullshit.com/art ... arot-work/
http://tarotelements.com/4632/caring-fo ... rot-cards/
http://www.bewitchingways.com/tarot/caring.htm
http://www.wikihow.com/Conduct-a-Tarot-Reading


Tarot- What and How

HousewifesTarot-QueenofSwords.jpg


A few theories of why and how tarot works:

Game theory – this explanation says that there is nothing in the least supernatural or mysterious about performing a Tarot reading, but it is, none the less, valuable. The basic idea is that the cards are randomly dealt and appear in a totally random order. However, the action of interpreting them is still useful. Most people tend to analyze situations in a very logical fashion, based on a set of unconscious assumptions and on a very limited set of expectations – and therefore tend to only come to a very standard set of conclusions, which may limit their understanding of the situations they find themselves in. However, the effort required to fit the ‘random’ cards into a ‘meaningful’ pattern forces a reader to think outside of their normal limited mindset, and can lead to fresh ideas, insights, and may force their intuition to begin solving problems in new and interesting ways. Thus although there is nothing ‘meaningful’ about the layout of the Tarot cards, the effort of trying to find meaning helps us gain better and more original insight into our problems. (Using randomly chosen cards with key words written on them to solve problems has, in fact, become a standard management training exercise) Of course, this game theory interpretation does little to suggest why another person would be able to read for you successfully.

Synchronicity – this was an idea that Karl Jung was terribly keen on. He suggested that as well as causality (the idea that every event occurs as the result of a specific cause) there is another reason why events occur – synchronicity. In some ways synchronicity is a posh way of saying ‘by coincidence’, but the implication is that as well as events being shaped by random chance there are occasionally ‘meaningful coincidences’, that is events that appear to happen purely by chance but carry some meaning for the person to whom they occur. So by using an elaborate system like laying out a Tarot spread (Jung himself used to work extensively with the I-Ching), we are invoking synchronicity into our lives, and the cards will ‘just happen’ to have arranged themselves into an order which tells us something useful about ourselves, or the question we have asked.

Subconscious influence – this is the suggestion that our subconscious minds are more powerful than we usually give them credit for being. Different areas of psychic study credit the subconscious mind with a whole array of powers and abilities of which we are generally unaware. As an explanation for the Tarot, it is usually supposed that in some way the subconscious mind ‘knows’ the order of the Tarot cards, and, through the shuffle, re-orders them so that they will lay out in an order which conveys a useful meaning to the person performing the spread, based on insights that the subconscious mind has presumably already had.

Magic(k) – Generally magic means ‘to make events occur in conformity to your will’. In this case, the will of the reader is that the cards will arrange themselves in a meaningful way, in order to reveal something useful. The magical explanation is simply that this focused intent is enough to make the cards arrange themselves in a useful way. This is, of course, not a mechanistic explanation, just a description of a particular way of viewing the Tarot. It involves accepting as an explanation that magic is real – the Universe really does respond and change according to the will of an individual. It also suggests there is some skill required in ‘making the Tarot work’ as well as simply interpreting the cards. A deck of Tarot cards is believed to be particularly susceptible to this form of magical influence, because of the way the cards are read. The uncertainty caused by the randomness of the shuffle makes it easier for the order of the cards to be influenced, as they aren’t fixed and could just turn up in the right order ‘by chance’. A great deal of magic is concerned with the simple manipulation of chance – which is one of the problems concerned with testing it.

Pixies – Invisible pixies take hold of the cards as you shuffle them and arrange them in the right order, then whisper the true meaning of them into the ear of the reader. Okay, I’ve not yet read an explanation that says exactly this (although some come alarmingly close, and internet is getting bigger every day). But let’s take this to represent that class of explanations for how the Tarot works that add some whole new unexpected factor to the explanation, and that immediately make you go “What the bloody hell are they on about?” There are lots of these, in many different flavors, and they are almost all based on the idiosyncratic world view of the person coming up with them.


؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏؏


I suggest those new to tarot should check out this website for “Six mistakes for reading tarot for yourself…”
http://www.biddytarot.com/six-mistakes- ... -yourself/

Devil, big.png



How to do a Tarot Reading



Step One: Figuring out what to ask the Tarot.


“What” questions are better to ask than “why” questions. Usually will get a deeper response.

Example: “what is the lesson that I need to learn?” VS. “Why did this happen?”



If you are doing a reading for someone else, have them tell you what they want to know and formulate a question that answer’s their question, using “What.”

Example: they come up with the question,” Why don’t my coworkers like me at work? A better question would be “What do I need to know about my work environment and what actions will allow me to feel in greater control?”





Step Two: Shuffling Deck


Option 1: Some readers will have the other person shuffle the deck, while both people think of the question as its being shuffled. The reader will place the cards.

Option 2: Some readers will shuffle the deck, while both people think of the question, then have the other person cut the deck. The reader will place the cards.

Option 3: Some readers will ask the other person to shuffle the deck, while both people think of the question, then tell the person where to place the cards.

Option 4: Some readers will shuffle the cards as they think of the other person’s question, then place the cards. (The other person doesn’t even have to be present)


Some people will do a combination of these but usually there are the most common ways people tend to shuffle cards.





Step Three: Placing the Cards


Personally, I like the simple lays like the past, present future one. Or the single card one. But here’s a link to some common tarot spreads to try.


http://www.tarotpedia.com/wiki/Tarot_spreads
http://www.squidoo.com/best-7-tarot-card-spreads




Step Four: Interpreting Your Spread

If you use a spread, each position has a meaning that applies to a certain part of your life. If you didn't buy a book that came with your deck, I like to use these websites for learning what each card means. You don’t have to memorize what each card means if you don’t want to, but it doesn't look as “professional” when you’re pulling out the computer or books. Personally, I don’t think it matters.


I like to use these website for looking up card meanings:

This website isn’t set up the best but it’s my favorite for card meanings:
http://www.crystal-reflections.com/tarot5/tarot5.htm

Another good one:
http://www.aeclectic.net/tarot/learn/meanings/


Tarot chart.jpg





Caring for your Tarot deck (Optional, in my humble opinion)

Now that you found the perfect deck it is necessary to properly care for them.
The first thing you will want to do is to cleanse and bless your deck. There are several ways to do this:

o You could write a Tarot cleansing and blessing ritual
o You can cleanse them with any or all of the elements
o You can smudge them
o You can leave them sit on a window sill for 24 hours so that they will be cleansed and charged by both the Sun and the Moon
o You can put them in numerical order (this is a quick way to do a cleansing of lingering energy. It is not recommended for an initial or a thorough cleansing).

Repeat this about once a year for each deck used for public readings.

You will know when it is time to cleanse your deck. You will notice a change in energy or the way you feel about your deck. Readings may also become less clear.

I find that if I put the deck in numerical order once a month or so, I tend not to have to do as much major cleanings. After a particularly nasty or trying reading or if I feel the connection dropping between myself and the cards, I will leave them on my window sill.


Storing your deck

Most Tarot readers suggest storing your cards in a black-lined bag or in a wooden Tarot card box. This not only physically protects your cards, but it also keeps them from picking up whatever energy is floating around.

You can include gemstones and herbs with divinatory powers or psychic improvement abilities with your cards.

Keep your cards covered when not in use.
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